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Quichotte

3.91  ·  Rating details ·  2,418 ratings  ·  524 reviews
In a tour-de-force that is both an homage to an immortal work of literature and a modern masterpiece about the quest for love and family, Booker Prize-winning, internationally bestselling author Salman Rushdie has created a dazzling Don Quixote for the modern age.

Inspired by the Cervantes classic, Sam DuChamp, mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly,
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Paperback, UK edition, 393 pages
Published September 3rd 2019 by Jonathan Cape (first published August 29th 2019)
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Emma Maybe not even until September 3rd.
OTOH, do ask the people involved directly. The chance they will discover your question here on this book page is…more
Maybe not even until September 3rd.
OTOH, do ask the people involved directly. The chance they will discover your question here on this book page is very small. Smaller than when you just ask them.(less)

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Average rating 3.91  · 
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 ·  2,418 ratings  ·  524 reviews


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Kevin Ansbro
"This is my quest,
to follow that star.
No matter how hopeless,
no matter how far."

Impossible Dream, Man of La Mancha



Anyone who has read my reviews (you crazy fools) will know that Sir Salman Rushdie has long been one of my literary heroes and that I feel he has lost his magic touch of late (we wants it, we needs it, nasty hobbitses!)

Happily, this devil-may-care, genre-bending, post-modernist fable marks a welcome return to form. That said, Rushdie has never quite been able to summon the
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Marchpane
Aug 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019
Quichotte is Salman Rushdie’s ode to Don Quixote and a playful take on the current state of the Western World. Enjoyment is by no means guaranteed and will likely depend on:

1. Your tolerance for chaotic, picaresque, hyper-verbal, pastiche, metafictional Pomo carry-on. Vertiginous literariness can be delicious or pestiferous, depending on your point of view.

2. How realistic you like your fiction. Quichotte’s fabulism pays homage to Cervantes, Arthur C Clarke’s sci fi, and films like Being
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BlackOxford
Sep 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
The New Normal

There are very few privileged stories left; all have become fair game for deconstruction and dismissal. Religious stories have self-destructed through their over-ripe pretensions to factualness. Political stories have all resolved themselves into the one story of the strong suppressing the weak. Business stories have shown themselves to be mere variations on themes of greed and self-aggrandisement. The professional stories of folk like doctors and lawyers and accountants have
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Bradley
Aug 01, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Oh my goodness.

Okay, so you fans of Midnight's Children, behold... Rushdie has gone off the deep end with the sublime, the meta, the satire, and especially the meta. Did I mention meta? I mean, META, BABY.

Yes, yes, this is a modern take and full homage to the Cervantes classic, but it's a hell of a lot more than just that. For one, our Quichotte is a self-made man in all the best ways like Quixote, but instead of going overboard with Chivalry, we see the full age of tv sitcoms, reality tv, and
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Lisa
Sep 20, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: salman-rushdie
A new fictional Quichotte, fighting the "errorists" of contemporary America, as imagined by the master of chaos (contained by narrative flexibility) - that is almost too much to bear!

A Dulcinea who is a television star suffering from opioid addiction, a Sancho in an identity crisis deriving from his late invention and his overbearingly quixotic father, a Cervantes divided between the high art of storytelling and the low art of moneymaking, the windmills of errorist reality - as spread by
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Seemita
Oct 04, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Stories beget stories. And amid nauseating realities, they are probably our only vehicle to a meaningful sail.
There are people who need to impose a shape upon the shapelessness of life.
And so, a Quichotte upon a Sam DuChamp, a Sancho over a Marcel DuChamp, a Human Trampoline over a Sister (DuChamp) – well, fictional characters to mirror the real characters including the author who is penning ‘Quichotte’. That’s right. A book within a book. A journey within a journey.

This book, as you know
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Betsy
Jul 01, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: netgalley
Patience pays off...

I'll be the first to admit that I'm not always the most patient reader.


This time, I'm glad I took others' advice and hung in there!



Quichotte was my first Rushdie novel, and it's true what people say about his style taking some getting used to. In this case, the chapters switch point of view, and each character's voice is written in a slightly different style.

The other thing that took patience was waiting for the different threads of the story to come together. At first, I
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Meike
Aug 28, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019-booker, india, usa
Now Shortlisted for the Booker Prize 2019
Much like I Am Sovereign (the novel I would have longlisted instead), this is a book about writing and the connection between fiction and how we narrate our own lives: Facing his past, Indian-born crime writer Sam DuChamp feels like a failure. Estranged from his family, he tries to righten his wrongs and starts to craft a re-telling of - you guessed it - Don Quixote with which he not only aims to create something more meaningful than his previous
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Hugh
Longlisted for the Booker Prize 2019

I am in two minds about what to say about this one. On one level it is (as Rushdie usually is) an entertaining read with a lot of interesting allusions, but overall I don't feel it is one of his best works, and too much of it feels like Rushdie by numbers (quite literally in the case of the many place names immediately followed by their populations).

Rushdie has created a novel within a novel - more than half of the book is his update on Don Quixote (or perhaps
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Gumble's Yard
Re-read ahead of my brief opportunity to ask the author about his book on BBC’s Front Row.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00...

He talked about wanting to take on the destructive, mind-numbing junk culture of his time just as Cervantes had gone to war with the junk culture of his own age. He said he was trying to write about impossible, obsessional love, father-son relationships, sibling quarrels and, yes, unforgivable things: about Indian immigration, racism towards them, crooks among them;
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Matthew Quann
This book is so bombastic, strange, and resplendent with expansive and meandering prose that I was pretty taken aback by how quickly it captured me. Usually this type of freewheeling ride kicks me off the train pretty early. The last Rushdie book I read, Midnight's Children , was taxing and I didn't seem to appreciate what people the world over seem to have loved. After a four year hiatus, I was compelled to test out Rushdie's latest after it landed on the Booker Shortlist for 2019 and I read ...more
Barbara
Nov 20, 2019 rated it really liked it

Salman Rushdie's book Quicotte (pronounced key-shot) is an homage to the tragicomic literary hero Don Quixote. In Miguel de Cervantes' novel 'Don Quixote de La Mancha', published in 1605, a middle-aged Spanish gentleman named Alonso Quixano becomes addled after reading too many heroic romances. Quixano dubs himself Don Quixote and - taking up sword and lance - embarks on a crusade to help the poor and destroy the wicked.



Don Quixote acquires a sidekick named Sancho Panza who accompanies him on
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Ron Charles
A homage to the wide-ranging wit and vision of Cervantes’s early-17th-century tale, “Quichotte” attempts to bring a similarly wry eye to the culture and politics of the early 21st century. So long as you can hum “The Impossible Dream,” you’ll catch the broad parallels between these two stories. Cervantes immortalized an old Spanish nobleman who goes mad from reading chivalric romances; Rushdie presents a worn-out pharmaceutical salesman from India who goes mad from watching TV.

An inability to
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Richard Derus
Oct 13, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: borrowed
This book came back to the library the MOMENT I came in to return books yesterday! My library's copy, that is; the system has lots of holds but I used my trump card: I, your local patron, want to read it. They gave it to me. Heh.

But seriously, Sir Salman, Quit. Trying. So. Hard!
He devoured morning shows, daytime shows, late-night talk shows, soaps, situation comedies, Lifetime Movies, hospital dramas, police series, vampire and zombie serials, the dramas of housewives from Atlanta, New Jersey,
...more
Doug
Aug 11, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
4.5, rounded up.

I can't really claim to have been much of a Rushdie fan before this, since the only other work of his I've read is his magnum opus, Midnight's Children, which I marginally enjoyed, but felt was a bit beyond my ken, since my knowledge of the Indian politics it satirized is marginal, at best. And I feared that, having never read Cervantes' original, I might be likewise at sea with this modern update/homage. And there may indeed have been minor connections I didn't make, but I never
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Kathleen
Oct 24, 2019 rated it liked it
Booker Prize Longlist 2019. Rushdie has jammed a lot in his latest novel—a LOT! This modern retelling of the Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote story includes Rushdie’s trademark magical realism, but it goes well beyond that. The point-of-view and action moves frenetically from one scene to next, requiring a high degree of concentration by the reader. Along the way, Rushdie bombards the reader with philosophical musings and literary references ranging from Jiminy Cricket (Pinocchio); The Lion, ...more
Faith
Sep 05, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Towards the end of this book, one of the characters describes his goals for a book he is writing. The description fits Rashdie’s multiple intentions for this book. “... to take on the destructive, mind-numbing junk culture of his time just as Cervantes had gone to war with the junk culture of his own age. He said he was trying also to write about impossible, obsessional love, father-son relationships, sibling quarrels, and yes, unforgivable things; about Indian immigrants, racism towards them, ...more
Eric Anderson
Sep 17, 2019 rated it it was ok
I was really looking forward to this novel as the subject matter intrigued me and I’ve been wanting to read more by Rushdie, but I ended up feeling mostly negative towards it. “Quichotte” is Rushdie’s modern day version of ‘Don Quixote’ and primarily concerns Ismail Smile (who dubs himself Quichotte.) He travels across the US on a foolhardy romantic quest to woo Salma R, a famous television personality. In the process he surveys how fiction has become fact and many facts are treated as fiction ...more
switterbug (Betsey)
Rushdie isn’t for everyone. He’s expansive, hyper-verbal, exuberant, urbane, and frequently absurdist. But he's generous, if flamboyant. A solid Salman novel, like this one, is also tender and sublime; he locates the reader sweet spot and delivers a potent, exquisite and heartfelt denouement. QUICHOTTE is speculative fiction designed as a picaresque and earnest tromp for true love. All the masks are off at the end and you are face to face with what we do to be our authentic selves, warts and ...more
Joy D
This book is a satire of life in the 21st century, covering contemporary issues such as immigration, globalization, multi-culturalism, celebrity, politics, religion, social media, opioids, racism, stalking, cyber hacking, and much more. It includes many pop-culture references, literary allusions, and socio-political commentary. Rushdie employs the idea behind Don Quixote, but this book is very different in tone and content, more like a riff on a theme.

The plot revolves around an author, Sam
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Paul Fulcher
Aug 27, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2019, booker-2019
“You know your stuff,” Sancho conceded in a grumbling voice. “I guess I’ll grant you that.”

“You lost me there,” Sancho shook his head. “But that’s okay.”


Cervantes Don Quixote is one of the greatest novels of all time, all the more brilliant for having been written over 400 years ago, in the early 17th century. Perhaps best known in popular culture for the eponymous mad knight, tilting at windmills, what really elevates the novel to true greatness is Part 2, published 10 years after the first,
...more
Neil
Sep 03, 2019 rated it it was ok
Shelves: 2019, 2019-booker
He talked about wanting to take on the destructive, mind-numbing junk culture of his time just as Cervantes had gone to war with the junk culture of his own age. He said he was trying also to write about impossible, obsessional love, father–son relationships, sibling quarrels, and yes, unforgivable things; about Indian immigrants, racism toward them, crooks among them; about cyber-spies, science fiction, the intertwining of fictional and ‘real’ realities, the death of the author, the end of the ...more
Trudie
Sep 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
4.5
My first experience with Rushdie and I was quite taken by this one. It’s a crazy, sprawling meta-fictional ride with a little sci-fi / absurdist bent. It does traverse a porous line between fantasy and reality. There are Mastodons as a kind of social metaphor, alongside stinging indictments of modern day America, Britain and India. This novel has such breadth and yet remains funny, propulsive and grandly risky. I loved it !
Ace
Aug 23, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Ok, I have not read Don Quixote and now I am pretty sure I don't want to.

I found this story dull, the language long winded and the characters ridiculous. I kept reminding myself that I was reading Rushdie (accomplished and successful), but that didn't help.

I didn't like Midnight's Children and now I can say I didn't like this either. I am removing the rest of his books from my TBR!
Erin Glover
The only thing I knew about Rushdie yesterday was that something like 30 years ago, Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran put a curse on him after he published a book, and Rushdie went into hiding, fearing for his life. I had not thought of Salman Rushdie since then, until Quichotte made the short list for the Booker prize. I’m reading all the nominees, so I picked up his latest novel.

As I began reading Quichotte, I held no preconceived notions about Rushdie or his writing. I held him to no higher (or
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Gumble's Yard
Aug 30, 2019 rated it it was amazing
To go with my main review of this book now shortlisted for the 2019 Booker Prize.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

These notes are my takeaways from an event in London on the night of the book's publication where Salman Rushdie was interviewed about his book.

Rushdie first read "Don Quixote" at college - but it was in in a Penguin classic translation which was dull and lifeless. Many year's later he read the Edith Grossman translation and it bought the novel alive for him as one that was
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Rakhi Dalal
How often is it that you come across a novel that overwhelms you in a manner indescribable, that leaves you with a nostalgia for the past and an ache for the future? I don’t remember having read anything other than A Hundred Years of Solitude by Marquez that has left me as dazzled as this opus by Sir Rushdie has.

I am left stunned by the sheer magnitude this novel encompasses. A homage to Don Quixote by great Cervantes, Quichotte is a parody of our times. A dreaded apocalypse brought about by a
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Jonathan Pool
Sometimes you can get a feeling for a novel from the quality, and the variety of good reviews (positive and negative) posted on Goodreads (and elsewhere). Quichotte has a diversity of very impressive reviews of an (at times) challenging book.

Author Salman RushdieMidnights Children (223,155 words) draws from, inter alia, Don Quixote by Miguel De Cervantes (344,665 words) for his latest novel, Quichotte (139,345 words).
Synopsis

What better way to describe the events of the book than to take
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Jonathan K
Oct 29, 2019 rated it really liked it
Having read a few of Rushdie's books, Quichotte is by far the best! Blending whimsy with a contemporary spin on Don Quixote he takes the reader on a journey into the mind Sam DuChamp, an author writing the Quichotte story toggling back and forth between his life and the characters. Adding contemporary political, economic and social elements along with subtle racial overtones the plot causes the reader to pay close attention. Rushdie has used some unusual naming, storytelling and character ideas ...more
Robert
Aug 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Back in 2018, when I reviewed Rushdie’s Golden House , I said that I enjoyed this angrier version of Rushdie and I hoped that this anger would continue with his next offering.

Well Quichotte is here and so is his anger, there are quite a few nasty swipes at the current state of the U.S. and Britain but I am getting ahead of myself.

This year’s Booker longlist consist modernisations of classic stories. There’s Jeanette Winterson’s take on Shelley’s Frankenstein, Chigozie Obioma gave African myths
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Goodreads România: || Noutati || Quichotte 11 73 Nov 05, 2019 02:27AM  
The Mookse and th...: 2019 Booker Shortlist: Quichotte 161 151 Oct 09, 2019 02:58PM  
Play Book Tag: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie - 4 stars 9 31 Aug 07, 2019 10:20AM  

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7,786 followers
Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a novelist and essayist. Much of his early fiction is set at least partly on the Indian subcontinent. His style is often classified as magical realism, while a dominant theme of his work is the story of the many connections, disruptions and migrations between the Eastern and Western world.

His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, led to protests from Muslims in several
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“BE A LAWYER in a lawless time was like being a clown among the humorless: which was to say, either completely redundant or absolutely essential.” 4 likes
“He devoured morning shows, daytime shows, late-night talk shows, soaps, situation comedies, Lifetime Movies, hospital dramas, police series, vampire and zombie serials, the dramas of housewives from Atlanta, New Jersey, Beverly Hills and New York, the romances and quarrels of hotel-fortune princesses and self-styled shahs, the cavortings of individuals made famous by happy nudities, the fifteen minutes of fame accorded to young persons with large social media followings on account of their plastic-surgery acquisition of a third breast or their post-rib-removal figures that mimicked the impossible shape of the Mattel company’s Barbie doll, or even, more simply, their ability to catch giant carp in picturesque settings while wearing only the tiniest of string bikinis; as well as singing competitions, cooking competitions, competitions for business propositions, competitions for business apprenticeships, competitions between remote-controlled monster vehicles, fashion competitions, competitions for the affections of both bachelors and bachelorettes, baseball games, basketball games, football games, wrestling bouts, kickboxing bouts, extreme sports programming and, of course, beauty contests.” 3 likes
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