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Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C.

4.47  ·  Rating details ·  53 ratings  ·  6 reviews
In this book, Ashante M. Reese makes clear the structural forces that determine food access in urban areas, highlighting Black residents' navigation of and resistance to unequal food distribution systems. Linking these local food issues to the national problem of systemic racism, Reese examines the history of the majority-Black Deanwood neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Bas ...more
Paperback, 184 pages
Published April 29th 2019 by University of North Carolina Press
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Alice Lemon
While this book was very much a case study of the Deanwood neighborhood of Washington, DC, rather than an analysis of these issues on a more national level, it had very interesting discussions on the local level.
Jania Hoover
May 13, 2019 rated it it was amazing
‪In Black Food Geographies, Dr. Reese masterfully breaks down complex issues related to racism & food access in a DC community. This same story plays out all over the US. (I see it in Dallas.) Reading about the systemic issues & historical context just blows my mind. ‬

I felt like I was walking through Deanwood with her, hearing the stories from community members. It’s crazy to consider the big picture of how racism touches every aspect of society. I’ve used the term food desert before—without co
...more
Dee
Aug 27, 2020 rated it it was amazing
"The Black spatial imaginary, produced through the ways Black people negotiate power, space, and confinement to produce places of care and celebration, reflects a socially-shared understanding of the importance of public space and its power to shape opportunities and life chances." p. 71

"These tensions are in part a by-product of the dissonance produced between individuals pursuing success and stability in a nation in which structural barriers ensure that achieving them is difficult for Black pe
...more
Claudia U.
Apr 18, 2021 rated it really liked it
Black Food Geographies is an excellent ethnographic text exploring the intersections of food access and race in a rapidly gentrifying D.C. As a trained anthropologist, I really enjoy a well-written and easily accessible anthropological text that dives deep into any social phenomena and deconstructs it. In 2021, anyone who's been paying attention to the news can attest to the the food insecurity that affects under-resourced communities and communities of color. What sets this book apart from the ...more
Sarah Critchley
Sep 30, 2020 rated it really liked it
This book is a highly accessible academic text that holds an important place in the food studies canon. Reese doesn't examine the systems that lead to so-called "food deserts," and she spends time carefully explaining the harm that such terminology has on how we view the agency of the people living in those areas. In her fieldwork, she focuses on learning the stories of the people living in Deanwood in Washington D.C., and how they view their relationship to food. Centering the people that she's ...more
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