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Patrick Melrose: Nerieš to

(Patrick Melrose #1)

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3.78  ·  Rating details ·  6,078 ratings  ·  766 reviews
Edward St Aubyn nám otvára dvere do sveta dekadencie, nemorálnosti, nenásytnosti, snobstva a krutosti – vitajte vo svete upadajúcej britskej smotánky.
Knižná séria o Patrickovi Melrosovi sa stala predlohou pre mimoriadne úspešný britský televízny seriál z roku 2018 v hlavnej úlohe s fenomenálnym Benedictom Cumberbatchom. Od nevinného detstva k sebadeštrukcii. Viac ako dvads
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Hardcover, 1. diel série, 184 pages
Published 2018 by Absynt (first published December 1992)
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Paul Bryant
Oct 01, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels
Update :

Oho! what fun! Sky have just filmed this and its nasty siblings with none other than Benedict Cumberbatch as Patrick Melrose... a perfect choice, nay, an inevitable choice. The Guardian describes the first episode as

a 60-minute near-monologue of craving, raving, shaking and sarcasm – occasionally interrupted by immigration officials, drug dealers, undertakers and relatives – as Melrose, in early 1980s New York, tries to collect his dead father’s ashes from a funeral parlour. Has any act
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Helle
Oct 23, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I cannot get over how brilliant Edward St Aubyn is! Not since Jane Austen have I encountered a voice that so manages to belong, at one at and the same time, to the character and to the author and with such adept English irony. Sarcasm, acerbic dialogue and caustic wit fairly drip from St Aubyn’s pen. I can only wonder how on earth this author has managed to fly under my radar all these years. Well, no more. I ordered the two next installments in his Patrick Melrose pentalogy when I was about hal ...more
Szplug
May 16, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
It is obvious from the very opening paragraphs of Never Mind that St. Aubyn can write with a skillful elegance that summons the descriptor effortless from the vocabular storage banks held recessed in the depths behind one's eyes; and nowhere does this compositional ease display itself more readily than in the dialogue between the handful of English aristocrats and upper-class aspirants, vacationing within the coastal inclines of Provence, who comprise the cast of this early nineties novel. He ca ...more
Eric
Feb 14, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
St. Aubyn does not, at least in this first book of the series, write especially well from the child’s point of view – and so the notoriously autobiographical rape is somehow less horrifying than it ought to be. Otherwise this is perfect, if at times slight. The prose is cool and pointed. The dialogue is almost never boring. The Melrose marriage made me think of The Portrait of a Lady but the Osmond figure is a real aristocrat, who augments Osmond’s cultured and covert emotional aggression with b ...more
Ammar
Jun 02, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: read-in-2018
My first time reading a novel by Edward St. Aubyn.

Never Mind is the first novel in the Patrick Melrose cycle.

Patrick Melrose aged 5, living at his mother’s house in the France. The cast of characters are upper class in the 1960s. Lots of drugs, pills, and various sleeping partners.

Patrick is aching for love and affection from his parents, but he is alone, he got no companions or siblings.

His father David: wanted to be a musician , not allowed, so he joined the army and became a physician. Hi
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Gumble's Yard
Jan 15, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2012
Series of 5 (or 3) books based around the life of Patrick Melrose (the first three novellas are typically published together).

Extremely good writing - beautiful use of language and real philosophical insight into a complex set of unappealing characters. In some ways reminiscent of Andreï Makine in writing style and (consciously) of Proust Marcel in its reflections on the past and portrait of a rich but declining generation. Semi-autobiographical the book's main theme is the effect of one's chil
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Lili
Aug 03, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: paperback, novel
The reviewer who said Edward St. Aubyn "most brilliant novelist of his generation" must have read a different book to me. I hoped at each turn of a page I would find something to like about this book, I didn't, I found it a boring tale about boring and obnoxious people.
Scott
Jan 06, 2013 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Very well-written, but icky. I choose not to spend my time reading about unpleasant Brits, damaged by class and too much money and leisure, doing unpleasant things to themselves and others. Is this meant to be an object lesson about what happens when people become estranged from any sense of communal responsibility? Give me Downton Abbey instead! :)
christa
Jan 01, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I know that a little extra excitement about a book really triggers my hyperbole button and it’s hard to dodge the exclamation points whizzing from my pores, but it’s happened again and I can’t shut up. I loved “Never Mind,” the first book of Edward St. Aubyn’s Patrick Melrose series. Love-loved. Mind blown, loved. My only regret is that I read it on Kindle, so I wasn’t able to snap it shut, sigh and set it on my bosom. Instead I did a less satisfying flick of a switch, closing of a case, bounce ...more
Shane
Jul 28, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Much has been said about the Patrick Melrose novels, but I found this first book in the series to be rather underdone.

Three couples (the men are British, two from the aristocracy and one a self-made man with a knighthood; their women are a mix) meet for dinner in the South of France and give us a glimpse into their lives of leisure. The aristocratic men David and Nicholas are self-indulgent, narcissistic bullies, while their women are weak, alcoholic and drug dependent. The knight is Victor, a p
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Roman Clodia
Feb 12, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
After all, what redeemed life from complete horror was the almost unlimited number of things to be nasty about.

Packed into a scant 135 pages (in my edition) is a world of cruelty, of brutish and deliberate superciliousness, of precise and measured mental and physical sadism - told through a voice which is detached, dry and deadpan in its disturbing wit.

It's the latter which prevents this from falling into sentimental misery-memoir territory: for example, as neglected, brutalized 5-year old Pa
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Tiffany Reisz
Aug 03, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
You would never think a book that takes place over one day and is nothing but the before, during, and after of a dinner party would be un-put-down-able. But this book was a ripping yarn, one hell of a page turner. It's literary fiction. And it's dark. And it's funny. And it's gruesome. I have to read all the Patrick Melrose books now. I'm sucked in. No going back.

For fans of mine who read the Original Sinners series, you should know that the character of David Melrose is giving me unpleasant ins
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Carolyn
Mar 31, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In this first of his Patrick Melrose novels, Edward St Aubyn brilliantly captures the lives and manners of a group of English upper class couples living in indolence and luxury on holiday in the south of France. Patrick is a small boy of five who is mostly neglected by his alcoholic, pill-popping mother and bullied my his brutal father. I did not particularly enjoy this book and don't think I will read further in the series, as I found the characters distasteful and nasty but really that just sh ...more
Jason Koivu
Nov 10, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
It's hard to say you loved something that also filled you with so much hatred. These characters are abominable. St. Aubyn's created a horrific and sad world. I can't wait to read the next one!
Beth Bonini
This novel is a marvel of compression and elegant writing. After finishing it, I realised that the events unspool over a mere 24 hour period and yet the author manages to create an entire world.

The cast of characters is small: 5 year old Patrick and his unhappily married parents David and Eleanor; their neighbours in France, Anne and Victor; and houseguest Nicholas and his girlfriend Bridget. The French couple who serve David and Eleanor Melrose are just glimpsed at the fringes. The story is se
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Lori
Mar 15, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literature
Last week (the week of March 12, 2012), I read a review in the New York Times of Edward St. Aubyn's fifth and final entry in a quintet of novels, referred to as The Patrick Melrose Novels. I became so intrigued from the review that I immediately downloaded all five of the books and started at the beginning. I'm so glad I did. Mr. St. Aubyn is a master of the craft of writing, designing sentences that are nearly musical in their balance. His story is not a comfortable one, delving into the worst ...more
Ben Loory
it's kinda like iris murdoch meets bret easton ellis. i can see why everyone's going crazy about this guy (he's very funny and his prose is propulsive and addictive) and i will probably go on to read the rest of the books. on the other hand, all the characters sort of slide into each other, it's very depressing, and the book doesn't really stand on its own. but i look forward to seeing the kinds of hell patrick goes through. and the kinds of hell he inflicts along the way.
Phrynne
Aug 27, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is the first in a series of five books about a wealthy, upper class Englishman called Patrick Melrose. In this book we meet Patrick at age 5 and discover some facts about his abusive father, his alcoholic mother and his generally unhappy start in life. It sounds awful but St Aubyn writes so beautifully and is often very humourous. I enjoyed it very much and intend to move straight on to book two.
Rebecca
An unpleasant little book about the upper-class English (“boredom plus money”) engaged in cat and mouse games in the South of France. The father, David Melrose, is a sixty-year-old doctor and an almost cartoonishly villainous sadomasochist. The mother, Eleanor, is a younger American who has retreated into pills and alcohol. Their five-year-old son, Patrick, is a serious and perceptive child who, by the end of the book, which takes place over the course of just one day, has presumably lost his in ...more
Ashley
Project: Catch Up On Review Backlog, review #10 out of 16

Pretty much ever since I abandoned grad school before I completed my doctorate (English lit!), I have been allergic to lit-fic. There is just something about modern literary fiction that hits me the wrong way. Most of it feels to me like the author is trying to impress me, to say something PROFOUND, and a heck of a lot of it is just middle aged white guys having mid-life crises in exactly the same way. I find it pretentious and samesy. The
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Bill Kupersmith
We were sailing off the Cornish coast when we sighted a castle on a small island called Saint Michael’s Mount and our skipper told us it belonged to a depraved family called St. Aubyn. Actually I think and hope he was wrong and the depraved St. Aubyns were cousins who lived on the Continent. I’d gone out of my way not to read any of Edward St. Aubyn’s autobiographical novels, but after I found the first featured a character based on the philosopher A. J. Ayer, I couldn’t resist. Basically in thi ...more
Tanja Berg
Jun 18, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A rather acerbic little novel about unsympathetic upper class people and the gold diggers that circle like satellites around them. The story centers around the narcissistic and violent David, his understandably alcoholic and down-trodden wife and the son, Patrick, that he he also abuses. It's terrible and astute, with astonishing humor.
Brian
Mar 13, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2012, fiction
St. Aubyn's characters are angry, mean-spirited, belligerent, and some are positively Darwinian. He seems to have contempt for all but one of them and the knowledge that he experienced some of the abuse in real-life does not excuse the retelling, nor make me want to continue.
Cheryl
Jun 05, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: british, fiction
Exhaustingly, relentlessly cutting. St. Aubyn is exacting his revenge on his parents and their ilk, by using their own weapons -- words -- with deadly precision.
Antonomasia
Oct 04, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Antonomasia by: Alex Sarll
Whilst St Aubyn's books were mentioned quite a bit in the Sunday papers when I was a teenager, I'd since forgotten about him or, rather, conflated him with Augusten Burroughs - until last summer when a friend's reviews reminded me.

I have to agree that most of this book is far from enjoyable in the general sense, but it is very good. (I found it nowhere near so intense and draining as some Bergman films, however, and for a moment couldn't decide whether to write this or start the next instalment
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Leslie
Apr 12, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2018-reads
Oh gosh. So I bought this whole series last year or the year before. I bought them because they were mentioned in some Buzzfeed article called, “100 Messed Up Books You Have to Read Before You Die.” I actually don’t think that was the title of the article but it was some clickbait thing that I fell for. It sat on my shelf until I saw there was going to be a Showtime series based on the novels starring Benedict Cumberbatch. Since I don’t think I’ll ever get more seasons of Sherlock, I decided I n ...more
Nigeyb
Jun 23, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Never Mind by Edward St. Aubyn is the first Patrick Melrose novel. The series was a strong recommendation from GoodReads friend Susan.

Patrick is still a small boy in this opening book, unfortunately for him, David Melrose, his father, is a sociopath with no redeeming features.

Never Mind is a curious mix: well written and frequently witty but also with some very dark content. It's not often in literature that a father beats and rapes his own five year old son.

The sociopathic content really jar
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Kat
Sep 24, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
The writing is amazing, as are the author's powers of observation and commentary. A funny thing happened to me when I was reading this book. When I was actually reading it, I was enormously impressed by the author's talent, but when I put it down, I had no desire to get back to it. It took me 4 weeks to read this slim 132 page novel!!! This is because of what happens in the book. I do not want to give things away, but the central character, David Melrose, is an utterly loathsome, depraved charac ...more
Liz
Nov 30, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Somewhere between 3.25 and 4 stars, depending on what I decide to focus on. What happens to the protagonist is harrowing and deeply traumatic, but the writing is superb as is the criticism of certain types of people and class. RTC.
Also, when I was reading up on these novels I stumbled upon the term "misery memoir", which I find rather degratory and well, problematic. I would not describe it as such, although yes, it is to a degree autobiographical and yes, what happens is terrible and traumatic
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David
Jun 18, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Full marks for the writing - which, alone, is worth the read!

I'm glad that my introduction to St. Aubyn's work was his subsequent novels 'A Clue to the Exit' and 'Lost for Words' - two easy-going, often frothy, fiercely intelligent and hilarious works. It's not that I prefer frivolity over pain but I was better prepared to enter the world of Patrick Melrose (by way of this first of the five novels) knowing that St. Aubyn had already entertained me wildly with satire.

'Never Mind' is also very fu
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Edward St Aubyn was born in London in 1960. He was educated at Westminster school and Keble college, Oxford University. He is the author of six novels, the most recent of which, ‘Mother’s Milk’, was shortlisted for the 2006 Man Booker Prize, won the 2007 Prix Femina Etranger and won the 2007 South Bank Show award on literature.

His first novel, ‘Never Mind’ (1992) won the Betty Trask award. This no
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Other books in the series

Patrick Melrose (5 books)
  • Bad News
  • Some Hope
  • Mother's Milk
  • At Last
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“At the beginning, there had been talk of using some of her money to start a home for alcoholics. In a sense they had succeeded.” 15 likes
“In my rather brief medical practice,' said David modestly, 'I found that people spend their whole lives imagining they are about to die. Their only consolation is that one day they're right.” 11 likes
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