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Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam

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4.18  ·  Rating details ·  18,371 ratings  ·  1,607 reviews
In 1859, Edward FitzGerald translated into English the short, epigrammatic poems (or "rubáiyát") of medieval Persian poet Omar Khayyám. If not a true translation--his Omar seems to have read Shakespeare and the King James Bible--the poem nevertheless conveyed some of the most beautiful and haunting images in English poetry, and some of the sharpest-edged. By the end of the ...more
Paperback, Oxford World's Classics, 240 pages
Published 2009 by Oxford University Press (first published 1120)
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Carsie Of course I did! "The Rubi-ki-yat of Omar Khay-ya-I-am appalled!" said by the mayor's wife was my first introduction to the poem and the direct reason…moreOf course I did! "The Rubi-ki-yat of Omar Khay-ya-I-am appalled!" said by the mayor's wife was my first introduction to the poem and the direct reason I sat down and read the copy I found in my grandmother's library this week--all these years after I first fell in love with the Music Man. (less)
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Ahmad Sharabiani
The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)
Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century.
I
Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight
The Stars before him from the Field of Night,
Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes
The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light.
II
Before the phantom of False morning died,
Methought a Voice within the Ta
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
ترانه های خیام = The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)

Omar Khayyám (1048–1131) was a Persian polymath, mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet. He wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, and music.

His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings.

Zamakhshari referred to him as “the philosopher of the world”. Many sources h
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
رباعیات عمر خیام با ترجمه انگلیسی = Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyam

Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century.

The Slender Story of his Life is curiously twined about that of two other very considerable Figures in their Time and Country: one of whom tells the Story of all Three. This was Nizam ul Mulk, Vizier to Alp Arslan the Son, and Malik Shah the Grandson, of Toghrul Beg the Tartar, who had wrest
...more
Manny
I kept thinking about the Rubaiyat last week while I was translating Zep's Happy Sex. I understand that Fitzgerald's translation is extremely non-literal, and almost amounts to a new poem - there is a nice piece by Borges discussing this unusual collaboration between two poets from different cultures and centuries. But what are you supposed to do when you translate poetry? Literal translation seems pointless. I had similar problems while trying to translate Zep's sexy French jokes. If the result ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
رباعيات خيام = The Rubáiyát, Omar Khayyám

The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám is the title that Edward FitzGerald gave to his translation of a selection of poems, originally written in Persian and numbering about a thousand, attributed to Omar Khayyám (1048–1131), a Persian poet, mathematician and astronomer. A Ruba'i is a two-line stanza with two parts (or hemstitch) per line, hence the word rubáiyát (derived from the Arabic language root for "Four"), meaning "Quatrains".
I
Wake! For the Sun, who scatte
...more
Jan-Maat
It is a flash from the stage of non-belief to faith,
There is no more than a syllable between doubt and certainty:
Prize this precious moment dearly,
It is our life's only fruit.


I had a palm size edition of Edward Fitzgerald's translation. He changed his translation over the years and there are big differences between some of the different published editions. Reading this, the Avery translation, was a shock because none of the verses were recognisable. At first I found myself like Pnin hankerin
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator)
Written 1120 A.C.E.
Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century.
I
Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight
The Stars before him from the Field of Night,
Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes
The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light.
II
Before the phantom of False morning died,
Methought a Voice within the Ta
...more
MihaElla
Jul 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A great Sufi poet, Omar Khayyam, has written in his Ruba’iyat, his world-famous collection of poetry: "I am going to drink, to dance, to love. I am going to commit every kind of sin because I trust God is compassionate -- he will forgive. My sins are very small; his forgiveness is immense."
He was a famous mathematician too, renowned in his country. Omar Khayyam's book was burned in his day. Whenever a copy was found, it was burned by the priests, because this man was teaching such a dangerous id
...more
Marilyn Hartl
Jun 06, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
In 1942, when my father was in the South Pacific, he asked for only one thing for Christmas...this book of poetry. My mother sent it to him with an inscription in the frontispiece which spoke wistfully of days to come. Later, he sent her a photo of him, reading this book, leaning back on a palm tree, with a bottle of wine and a loaf of bread on the cloth beside him...on the back of the photo, he wrote, "...all I'm missing is thou..."

Obviously, this book is a family treasure, and I cannot read it
...more
Roy Lotz
I feel a bit awkward reviewing a book this short, so I’ll keep my review short as well. There are some very fine verses here, especially good to read before a night of drunken foolery. Although FitzGerald’s translation is known for being somewhat inaccurate, I wouldn’t even consider trading it for a more scrupulous edition. Instead, why not view the poems as an artistic collaboration between two great poets, across time and space?

When small-minded tin-eared scholars
Take a look at his verse and
...more
Rosa Jamali
Jul 13, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It wasn't easy to praise wine and create SEIZE THE DAY theme in twelfth-century Iran just after a long time that Baghdad had ruled in Iran and had bullied a nation by the name of religion; though inspiring enough!!! A big civilization is going to be extinct if they no longer use their own alphabet for writing in Arabic had been highly suggested!...
Now it's high time that an autonomous Persian government is going to be established which could revitalise the fading culture of the past. In Rubaiyat
...more
Jill Hutchinson
Jun 05, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
This book was owned by my late uncle, passed on to my late brother and passed on to me. Published in 1900, it is a treasure in our family and I have read it too many times to count. But that was before I became a GR member....so it will show up as my first read. I picked it up yesterday and read it one more time and reacted to it as I did the first time. Fascinated and amazed. It is such a joy.
Shivam Chaturvedi
Jul 13, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Shivam by: Kuunal Malhotra
If you were ever to compile the different odes to alcohol (there are likely to be very many in different languages and dialects, recited in different stages of inebriation), then this would have to rank right at the very top. The beauty and wonder with which Omar Khayyam has constructed his poem is a joy to behold. The comparisons stun you, for you'd have never seen it that way before. You almost get the feeling that you're sitting in one of those taverns in Arabia, that we so often see in movie ...more
W
Nov 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, poetry
I can't say how good Omar Khayyam's original work was,because it's in Persian.If it weren't for the translation by Edwatd FitzGerald,I wouldn't have been familiar with him.

It is brilliant,awesome,majestic.No matter how many times I read it,it leaves me awestruck.

FitzGerald took liberties with the original text.It is more of a paraphrase,than a translation.And then he wrote several different versions,sometimes improving his original work,sometimes not.

But the quality of FitzGerald's poetry remain
...more
Steve
Omar Khayyam (Ghiyāth ad-Dīn Abu'l-Fatḥ ʿUmar ibn Ibrāhīm al-Khayyām Nīshāpūrī: 1048 - 1131), born in Nishapur, educated in Samarkand and professionally active in Bukhara, was a brilliant mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who wrote poetry during the last years of his life,(*) when, after his patrons were killed or removed from power towards the end of the Seljuk sultanate and while new waves of Turkic tribes were breaking over the crumbling walls of Central Asian cities, he gave up scien ...more
Zanna
Oct 16, 2015 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
First, let Orientalism be taken as read. Fitzgerald has not translated Khayyam's poetry, rather has appropriated some of the substance, stripped context from it, shaped it to the white gaze. As Said discusses, his work is regarded as a kind of mining, extracting the raw elements and then refining them to make real art, something an "Oriental" is presumed incapable of. Fitzgerald apparently had a genuine passion for Khayyam's work, but the preface reveals an uncritical view of British imperia ...more
Florencia
What is most vital is that Fitzgerald completely misconstrued the meaning of the Persian mystic. He regarded Khayaam’s poem as a statement of hedonism and atheism… Graves discloses, on the contrary, that the poem expresses profound religious faith. Perhaps Fitzgerald lacked sufficient knowledge of Persian. Perhaps the symbolism of the Rubaiyyat simply eluded him.

Excerpt from the "original" Rubaiyyat which isn't original at all and perhaps that is the only truth it contains, who knows. Apparently
...more
Nandakishore Varma
Oct 25, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry
I first read this as a child of maybe 11-12 and could make neither head nor tail out of it. But the book (which belonged to my great-uncle) had impressive illustrations for each quatrain, and this drew me in. It was only much later that I could appreciate the beauty of Fitzgerald's language (yes, I am talking about the Fitzgerald translation, which I understand is almost an original work by itself).

Awake! For the sun in the bowl of night
Has flung the stone which puts the stars to flight;
And lo!
...more
Himanshu
And when like her, oh Saki, you shall pass
Among the Guests Star-scatter'd on the Grass,
And in your joyous errand reach the spot
Where I made One-turn down an empty Glass!


*Heading to the bar in all drunkenness of Khayyam's swiveling wisdom*
Jon Nakapalau
“The moving hand once having writ moves on. Nor all thy piety nor wit can lure it back to cancel half a line.” Some of the most beautiful poetry I have ever read...I read this book when I feel down and always find a line or two that lifts me up.
Debbie Zapata
Sep 14, 2017 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: gutenberg
Who remembers The Purple Cow?

Burgess wrote that in 1895!

Who knows what a blurb is?

Burgess created that word in 1907!

Who has read The Rubaiyat Of Omar Kayyam?

No, Burgess wasn't the man who first translated that Persian poem into English, that was Edward Fitzgerald. But Burgess was one of the many authors who copied the style for their own purposes. I've read the Rubaiyats of a Persian kitten, a motor car, and a huffy husband. I suppose I will read others in the future if I come across them; I s
...more
Stian
Jul 13, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book is a wonderful collection of translations of the Rubáiyát. The classic Edward FitzGerald-translation is wonderful. The McCarthy-translation is elegant and strangely reminiscent of the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius (at least for me). This is the most comperehensive of the three translations, and so needless to say it contains a lot more wine! The last of the three is Richard Le Gallienne's translation, which is my favourite. Le Gallienne admitted that he used "the freest use of my own ...more
David
Aug 11, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: pomez
Some poetry snobs find these verses corny, with their psuedo-archaism of langauge and what nowadays would be called Orientalist romanticism.

To Hell with all that. I've always liked them. In fact, I memorized most of it when I was a kid.

"The moving Finger writes, and having writ,
Moves on, nor all your Piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel Half a Line,
Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it."

Yadda yadda.

__________

Incidntally, Omar Khayyam was a great Persian mathematician. "Omar" is a Sunni
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
Wake! For the sun, who scatter'd into flight
The stars before bim from the field of Night,
Drives Nighit along with them from heav'n,
and strikes,
The Soltan's Turret with a Shaft of Light. Khayyam
Ekib
Aug 22, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: poetry, wisdom, melancholy

Childhood favourite.
"Come, fill thy cup and in the fire of spring,
The winter garment of repentance fling;
The bird of time has but a little way to fly
And lo, the bird is on the wing."
Anurati
Mar 14, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
How do you write the review of a book whose every word you wish to etch into your cold steel heart?
Nathan "N.R." Gaddis
The author is clearly biased in the direction of the Grape ; which makes for difficulties of empathy for this Malt Man.

[curiously that this edition I've got was printed in the DDR.]
Pontus Alexander
Now the new year reviving old desires
The thoughtful soul to solitude retires . . .
Aubrey
If drunk with Magian wine I am, I am,
If heathen, idolist or Gebr—I am;
Each Order calls me what it thinks I am,
but I am what indeed I know I am.
Back when I read How to Live, I got the feeling of being newly able to connect the dots, as it didn't take the author explicating the figure's influence on many a chronologically forward inheritor for me to observe the commonality between Montaigne's predilections and a number of more recent (relatively speaking) others. Khayyam has had an even more f
...more
Settare
Persian Below.
I am more than thrilled to come across any non-Farsi speaker who reads, enjoys, and loves Khayyam in translation (especially Oscar Wilde). To me, a native speaker, the translations sound a lot less magnificent than the original, understandably.
He celebrates life, love, dance, and the beauty of being here and now to the fullest, and I feel like his Rubayis can be as much of solace in dark times to anyone as they are to me.
So, I am truly sorry, but I'd rather keep the rest of this "
...more
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Arabic:عمر الخيام Persian:عمر خیام
Kurdish: عومەر خەییام


Omar Khayyám was a Persian polymath, mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet. He wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, and music. His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings. Zamakhshari referred to
...more

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