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New Mathematical Diversions (Spectrum Series)

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4.25  ·  Rating details ·  55 Ratings  ·  4 Reviews
Martin Gardner instructs us about mathematics as he entertains us with his wit and sense of the absurd. He stimulates, challenges, and delights his readers. Answers are provided for problems, as well as references for further reading and a bibliography. The Postscript provides updates to the problems.Martin Gardner published his first book in 1935. Since then he has charme ...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published January 1st 1997 by Mathematical Association of America (MAA) (first published 1966)
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Charles
Jan 26, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Even though I have read most of his writings more than once, Martin Gardner is one of the authors that will never take you down a path of satiation. There is no question that more people have been turned on to mathematics or had their mathematical motor revved by Martin Gardner's writings than by any other person in history. His signature writings were the "Mathematical Games and Recreations" column that appeared monthly for 25 years in "Scientific American." This book is a republication of 20 o ...more
Charles
Jan 28, 2015 rated it it was amazing
If there were a mathematics of watching paint dry, Martin Gardner would make it interesting. Without peer as a popularizer of mathematics, he is equally adept at explaining all areas. This book, another updated collection of his Scientific American columns, is a twenty member set of polished pearls. Although somewhat mundane as a descriptive adjective, the word readable fits his writing like a custom made body stocking.
Always interesting and entertaining, reading his essays is somewhat like eati
...more
Noé
May 21, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
An excellent compilation of recreatinal mathematics, puzzles, activities and theories that challenge your brain and teach you something new. It is very fun to go through the different games mentioned by the author; if you like mathematics in any way, this is a must read.
Jim Razinha
Apr 15, 2014 rated it liked it
Not as many engaging puzzles for me in this one, but I still like reading the collections.
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Martin Gardner was an American mathematics and science writer specializing in recreational mathematics, but with interests encompassing micromagic, stage magic, literature (especially the writings of Lewis Carroll), philosophy, scientific skepticism, and religion. He wrote the Mathematical Games column in Scientific American from 1956 to 1981, and published over 70 books.
More about Martin Gardner