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Ty and The Babe: Baseball's Fiercest Rivals: A Surprising Friendship and the 1941 Has-Beens Golf Championship
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Ty and The Babe: Baseball's Fiercest Rivals: A Surprising Friendship and the 1941 Has-Beens Golf Championship

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3.63  ·  Rating details ·  187 ratings  ·  21 reviews
Early in the twentieth century, fate thrust a young Babe Ruth into the gleaming orbit of Ty Cobb. The resulting collision produced a dazzling explosion and a struggle of mythic magnitude. At stake was not just baseball dominance, but eternal glory and the very soul of a sport. For much of fourteen seasons, the Cobb-Ruth rivalry occupied both men and enthralled a generation ...more
Hardcover, 238 pages
Published May 15th 2007 by Thomas Dunne Books
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Average rating 3.63  · 
Rating details
 ·  187 ratings  ·  21 reviews


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Start your review of Ty and The Babe: Baseball's Fiercest Rivals: A Surprising Friendship and the 1941 Has-Beens Golf Championship
Guy
Sep 26, 2020 rated it liked it
If you love baseball this is a must read. It actually goes beyond baseball into the lifelong competition love of golf and very real friendship between two sports icons
Steven Peterson
Oct 02, 2009 rated it liked it
This is a strange little book. For one thing, it presents a far more positive picture of Ty Cobb than one often encounters. Second, golf becomes a key part of the relationship between two bitter antagonists--Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb.

Ty Cobb was an exemplar of the old fashioned "scientific" approach to baseball, bunts, stolen bases, sacrifices, etc. Babe Ruth was a harbinger of a new era--focusing on the home run.

Cobb versus Ruth, while they were in the major leagues together, had a pretty negativ
...more
Alex
Feb 21, 2009 rated it liked it
A decent little book about Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb's relationship. Arguably the two greatest players of all time, one exemplified the Dead Ball Era and the other the Lively Ball Era. Since Ruth and his era replaced Cobb and his, naturally, Cobb initially disliked Ruth. Ruth returned the hatred. The dislike eventually grew to reluctant respect, then sterile admiration, and then genuine friendship.

Half the book is about their 3-part golf match in 1941 which is both interesting and a little dull. It'
...more
John
Jul 16, 2008 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: anyone, baseball history freaks
Recommended to John by: my father-in-law
Fascinating accounts of the dualism connected to baseball's two most recognizable names. The stories are great and I like to be reminded of how the game was in the teens and '20s in America. The writing is a little dry, though. This book was given to me, but I am not normally in the custom of seeking out Tom Stanton's work. He is a capable and competent baseball historian, but lacks the zip that can make a good story sing.
Agatha Lund
Jan 07, 2008 rated it it was ok
Shelves: 2008, baseball
The subject material was fascinating -- as the title says, the turbulent relationship between Ty Cobb and Baby Ruth -- but the writing was so purple that I couldn't recommend this to anyone who didn't have a strong stomach. Worth it for what I learned, but a real struggle to finish.
Michael Stetz
Aug 17, 2016 rated it liked it
Any book that combines baseball history and golf with talk of The Masters and a little Calcutta action is good in my book.
Ellison
Oct 24, 2020 rated it liked it
Begins with 1939 Hall of Fame inductions, then flashback to a decade of unpleasant encounters on ball fields for a decade, occasional insights. Then goes to them engaging in three charity golf matches. B/W images. Easy to set aside.
Jason
Aug 29, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sports, biography
An enjoyable book, and a pretty easy read, although it would have benefitted from cutting about 30-40 pages. This book presents Ty Cobb in a VERY different light than anything I have ever read or heard before. While he was fiercely competitive on the field, he was liked and respected by his fellow players off it. The author provides ample evidence of this view of Cobb, and fairly portrays his racism as being no better or worse than the norm among southerners of that time. (Stanton says his views ...more
Mike
Mar 31, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: baseball
A great book to finish reading on Opening Day. Tom Stanton found a 1941 trio of charity golf (grudge) matches between Ty Cobb and the Bambino, and uses them to recount in fresh, vivid prose the playing history and complicated relationship of these two giants of the game.

Of particular interest to this reader was the rehabilitation of Cobb's reputation that this book represents. Stanton goes to great lengths to present a clearer, more comprehensive look at the man behind the violent, angry myths.
...more
David
Mar 14, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: own, sports, non-fiction
This book placed me literally 80-100 years back and made me feel as if I was in the same room with "the supermen of baseball," Tyrus Raymond Cobb and Babe Ruth. Tom Stanton did an exceptional job portraying the relationship these two greats shared both on the baseball field and on the golf course. These two were well-known to be very competitive athletes and their numbers didn't lie. Ty Cobb won batting title after batting title while Babe Ruth set record after record. After reading this book, I ...more
Robert
Aug 28, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Great baseball book. As a fan of baseball history this was right up my alley. Stanton is a very good author when it comes to baseball history. I love some of the quotes from the old time baseball players (Speaker, Walter Johnson, Foxx, etc.). Cobb's frustration with passing the torch to Ruth is just a really interesting read. The relationship these two guys had highlighted the 1920's - 1940's headlines. They were always competing against each other and that competition continued after baseball i ...more
Ian
Aug 07, 2007 rated it really liked it
A fascinating look at a rivalry (and friendship) I honestly hadn't given much thought to as a baseball fan. (Maybe I need to brush up on my baseball history, and if so, this was a good start.) Stanton lost me a little bit with the golf stuff (not a golf fan), but kept it compelling with his portrayals of those involved.
Kate
Mar 18, 2009 rated it really liked it
This is a great read for baseball fans and golf fans, alike. It gave an amazing insight into the humanity of these two men. It was humorous at times and ,for the most part, entirely entertaining. Baseball was a different game back in those days and this novel really exemplifies this.
Mark Stratton
May 19, 2010 rated it really liked it
Shelves: baseball
A fascinating look at the rivalry between Cobb and Ruth, two titans of the game during their day and for years after. Focusing on the human elements of both men, with The Legend of both woven skillfully through, Stanton tells an engaging and enlightening story.
David-jacky Breech
Jul 22, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Great book about two of the greatest baseball players ever
Tom Stanton
Dec 29, 2007 added it  ·  (Review from the author)
Another of my books
.
Nick
Nov 05, 2007 rated it liked it
Shelves: baseball
Really a light book but it is an interesting read, hung on a series of charity golf matches between Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth.
Joshua
Oct 09, 2014 rated it it was ok
I couldn't get into this book. The first half was about baseball, and I couldn't get into it. If I can't get into the part about baseball, then I'll have a ton of trouble with the section about golf.
John
Apr 02, 2010 rated it really liked it
Stanton offers a new perspective on two legends. It's detailed, well-researched and a great read.
Tim Dunn
Aug 03, 2011 rated it liked it
A nice book, quick read....some very funny stories, but nothing to really blow you away. Worth it to read if you're a sports fan.
Great Lakes Booksellers Association
Finalist for 2008 Great Lakes Book Award in the General Category
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Robert
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Aug 26, 2011
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I feel fortunate to have been writing professionally since age 18, beginning back in the final year of Jimmy Carter's presidency, when I sported a poorly executed, Peter Frampton-inspired perm. Decades on, my hair is gone, but writing remains central to my life. I've been a reporter, editor, publisher and, more recently, an author and journalism professor (Go University of Detroit Me
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