Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “The Lost World of the Torah: Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context” as Want to Read:
The Lost World of the Torah: Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

The Lost World of the Torah: Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context

(The Lost World Series #6)

4.24  ·  Rating details ·  33 ratings  ·  10 reviews
Our handling of what we call biblical law veers between controversy and neglect.

On the one hand, controversy arises when Old Testament laws seem either odd beyond comprehension (not eating pork) or positively reprehensible (executing children). On the other, neglect results when we consider the law obsolete, no long carrying any normative power (tassels on clothing, makin
...more
Paperback, 256 pages
Published February 26th 2019 by IVP Academic
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about The Lost World of the Torah, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about The Lost World of the Torah

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
4.24  · 
Rating details
 ·  33 ratings  ·  10 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Bob
May 26, 2019 rated it really liked it
Summary: Like other books in this series, argues that Torah must be understood in its Ancient Near East context as a legal collection teaching wisdom and covenant stipulations rather than legislation, and cannot be appropriated into a system of moral or social ethics today.

The first five books (Torah) of the Bible are challenging for any person who believes the Bible inspired by God and having authority in one's life. John Walton, joined in this volume by his son, have written a series of books
...more
Joel Wentz
Apr 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
**This was originally reviewed for the Englewood Review of Books. That review can be found here: http://englewoodreview.org/john-walto....**

I have vivid memories of devouring The Lost World of Genesis One, a slim paperback from an Old Testament scholar I had no previous exposure to. It felt like every page packed major insight into the nuances of Hebrew language and literary genres, the cultural context of the ancient world, and comparisons to other religious literature of the Near East. I remem
...more
Ionia
Jan 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I have been taking theological courses and have been devoting my extra hours to a lot of theological/philosophical reading. When I saw this book, I had hoped that reading it would clarify for me the purpose of the Torah, not through a 21st Century lens, but as to its original purpose. I am pleased to say, that it that, and much more.

This is a very well-written and thought provoking book, that explains what the Torah is and how it was meant to function in the society it was written for. Whilst m
...more
Leandro Guimarães
May 18, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I muſt ſay my giviŋ five ſtars does not mean I am ſure I totally agree wiþ ðe auþors. I gueß I will need to read furþer books before convinciŋ myself, even if ðe propoſal conveniently expoſes ðe weakneßes of claßical (Baptiſt & Preſbyterian) alliance þeology — not ðat ðe auþors mention it. Ðey make a convinciŋ, even if perhaps not as readable as I would want, caſe for ‘Law’ beiŋ a miſtranſlation for Torah, even if the LXX actually tranſlates νομος. Ðe implications are multitude, & ðey in ...more
Debbie
Jan 07, 2019 rated it did not like it
Shelves: christian
This book uses very academic language, which didn't serve to clearly communicate the author's ideas. Even the examples didn't clarify things. He argues that the Torah does not contain a legal code but was intended to teach wisdom so that those who made judgments would have a certain sense of what was a good and a bad judgment. After muddling through it, all I can say is that he didn't convince me with his arguments. Here are some examples, as I understand them:

1) The Torah is not comprehensive (
...more
William
Mar 25, 2019 rated it really liked it
As I read Walton's "The Lost World of the Israelite Conquest" a year or two ago I was thinking that this is the book I wished he'd actually written. That book addressed the question of "holiness" in the context of Yahweh's covenant with Israel. It touched on the nature of Torah, but only just. I'm glad the Walton's have followed up, although I would have appreciated more discussion of how we might exegete and apply the Torah today. I'm a preacher and that's my job. Other's may not share that con ...more
Michelle Kidwell
Feb 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing
The Lost World of the Torah
Law as Covenant and Wisdom in Ancient Context

by John H. Walton; J. Harvey Walton


InterVarsity Press

IVP Academic

Christian , Religion & Spirituality

Pub Date 26 Feb 2019


I am reviewing a copy of The Lost World of the Torah through Intervarsity Press/IVP Academic and Netgalley:


In this book the first Proposition that is inserted is that because the Old Testament is an ancient document, we can not read it as if it is modern. We are reminded too that Scholars have a role in
...more
Aaron Case
Jun 03, 2019 rated it it was amazing
This entire series aims to help the modern reader understand the meaning of the ancient biblical texts as the author and original readers would have understood it. Like it or not we bring our own cultural viewpoint to these ancient texts. As Walton & Walton put it, the original author and audience had their own cultural river, comprised of customs, language, and worldview, that is much different than our own. Understanding what they were saying helps us understand what the text truly means. ...more
Bernice Lofton
May 15, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Some Good Points

I'm not sure what I was expecting, but I expected more. However, it was a good read and I enjoyed it. It does bring out the fact that the Torah still has value for us today.
Dennis Gunnarson
Apr 01, 2019 rated it it was amazing
The book was significant for those who want to understand how to understand the Old Testament and how to relate the New Testament to the Old Testament.
Ian Spencer
rated it really liked it
Mar 19, 2019
Brier Stucky
rated it really liked it
Mar 12, 2019
Jamin Bradley
rated it it was amazing
May 09, 2019
Caley
rated it it was amazing
Jun 14, 2019
Todd
rated it liked it
Mar 15, 2019
Mark Mathewson
rated it it was amazing
Jun 10, 2019
Ellen Vosburg
rated it really liked it
Mar 14, 2019
Joel
rated it liked it
May 13, 2019
Gary
rated it it was amazing
May 18, 2019
Don Brooks
rated it it was ok
Jun 07, 2019
Sean Dickard
rated it really liked it
Mar 22, 2019
Nate Claiborne
rated it really liked it
Feb 17, 2019
Ian Howard
rated it really liked it
May 11, 2019
Ben
rated it really liked it
Apr 23, 2019
Nick
rated it it was amazing
Feb 07, 2019
Wendy Gierhart
rated it it was amazing
Feb 28, 2019
Jon
rated it it was amazing
May 03, 2019
Anna Linhardt
rated it really liked it
Apr 29, 2019
Richard
rated it really liked it
May 24, 2019
Scott
rated it it was amazing
Apr 09, 2019
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
116 followers
John H. Walton (PhD, Hebrew Union College) is professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College Graduate School. He is the author or coauthor of several books, including Chronological and Background Charts of the Old Testament; Ancient Israelite Literature in Its Cultural Context; Covenant: God’s Purpose, God’s Plan; The IVP Bible Background Commentary: Old Testament; and A Survey of the Old Testament ...more

Other books in the series

The Lost World Series (6 books)
  • The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2–3 and the Human Origins Debate
  • The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate
  • The Lost World of Scripture: Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority
  • The Lost World of the Israelite Conquest: Covenant, Retribution, and the Fate of the Canaanites
  • The Lost World of the Flood: Mythology, Theology, and the Deluge Debate