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Perfect Software--And Other Illusions about Testing

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  196 ratings  ·  15 reviews
Editorial Reviews - Perfect Software
Hardcover, 182 pages
Published January 1st 2008 by Dorset House Publishing Company, Incorporated
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4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  196 ratings  ·  15 reviews


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Matthew
Jul 07, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Note: Not my first time through this book.

This book should be mandatory reading for all software development professionals, particularly managers. Gerry has a great way of communicating the value of testing, the pitfalls of common approaches to development and test management, as well as what testers should be focusing on when it comes to communication.
Karin Axelsson
Aug 13, 2015 rated it liked it
"No amount of computing power can compensate for brainless testing."
Matt Diephouse
Dec 10, 2017 rated it liked it
There was some good info in here: about the inability to exhaustively test, how to classify bugs, etc. But I found the bug hard to get through and poorly organized. (The latter was due largely to the poor formatting of the Kindle version, I expect.)

The writing switched between unnecessary, contrived narrative and a more bullet-point style. I found both very distraction, and I'm not sure which I liked least.
Igor
Dec 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Great read. Definitely would recommend it to anyone interested in software development, not just tje testing.
Oleksii Burdin
Oct 29, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: testing
Great reading on how software is developed and what testers can do about it.
Charles
Dec 26, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Exhaustive testing of software is generally impossible; in all but the most simple of cases the number of possible paths is effectively infinite. By that I mean that while the number is finite, it is so large that only a tiny percentage could ever be tested. So in practice the number is infinite. Since humans are prone to error and the number of possible paths where a bug can be introduced into a program is also very large, the bug-free (perfect) program is an unattainable goal. It is no fun, bu ...more
Howard
Jun 17, 2009 rated it really liked it
Once you've been in the testing industry for a while, you may start to forget the questions you had when you started. You may be astounded when someone asks why you insist on testing. You may have forgotten what it's like to wonder why someone should test something. You may not actually know why you're testing - it's just something you do. It takes the insight of crossing paths with dozens or hundreds of naive souls working in the computer world all asking the same questions over and over again ...more
Elizabeth
Oct 09, 2013 rated it really liked it
Gerry Weinberg succinctly described many of the interpersonal struggles at my job and reinforced much of the stuff James Bach's preached in person. His explanations of what testing cannot do and why estimates at the beginning of a project are always too optimistic were spot on. This was a good reminder that testing is a waste of time if you're not going to do anything with the information you uncover.

The sections of supposed journal entries or dialogue did not help shed light on the material. A
...more
Henriette
Oct 29, 2015 rated it really liked it
Shelves: testing
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was written in a way that made it easy and entertaining enough to read in a day. It answers some questions about software testing, but more importantly reminds us of questions we should be asking when testing. If you are familiar with James Bach then you will see many similarities and even references to James Bach in this book. This book is a real reminder of why testers are needed and why testers can never be replaced by computers and therefore a recommended r ...more
Gilbio
Sep 05, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: technology
An interesting journey around the world of software development, with a particular focus on testing activities. An hard landing for who think that the perfect in this world really exists! As the author underlines "When we want so much for everything to go well, it's all too easy to inject our fantasies into our data"
Sergiusz Golec
Jul 04, 2015 rated it liked it
+ Wit & vivid stories.
- Part of this book is a copy paste (or a paraphrase) from other books. Like "More Secrets of Consulting" by Gerald M. Weinberg.
Željko Filipin
Jan 02, 2017 rated it really liked it
A very short review on my blog: http://filipin.eu/perfect-software-an...
Ilya
Dec 19, 2012 rated it it was amazing
Iron ore mine of testing wisdom. Reading experience is stunning as is the case with all Gerald's books (at least those I read).
Janice
Nov 29, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Helped me answer exam questions for my CSQA. It's a great resource and makes sense.
Rebecca Long
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286 followers
Gerald Marvin Weinberg (October 27, 1933 – August 7, 2018) was an American computer scientist, author and teacher of the psychology and anthropology of computer software development.
“Testing gathers information about a product; it does not fix things it finds that are wrong.” 4 likes
“If you don't have questions about a product's risks, then there's no reason to test. If you have at least one such question, then ask: Will these tests cost more to execute than their answers will be worth?” 4 likes
More quotes…