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The Texture Of Memory: Holocaust Memorials And Meaning
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The Texture Of Memory: Holocaust Memorials And Meaning

really liked it 4.0  ·  Rating details ·  118 Ratings  ·  7 Reviews
In this study of Holocaust memorials, James E. Young explores both the idea of the monument and its role in public memory, disucssing how every nation remembers the Holocaust according to its own traditions, ideals, and experiences, and how these memorials reflect the ever-evolving meanings of the Holocaust in Europe, Israel and America. The result is a study of Holocaust ...more
Hardcover, 398 pages
Published April 28th 1993 by Yale University Press
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Jenny.p
May 30, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is THE book on Holocaust memory and memorial history. Totally inclusive--Young explores the memorial impulse from its beginnings. It looks at the memorial impulse across the world, not just in Europe and respects both regional approaches to memory, group and individual mean-making. It is dense, and difficult to digest if a readers has no prior experience with the topic. But truly brilliant and worth wading through.
Yemoss
Oct 01, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Lessons learned here are about appreciating artwork - specifically, memorials dedicated to the Holocaust. Multinational examples focus on Israel, Germany, Poland, Austria and America. What is the difference between a monument and a memorial? What did the artists intend and how is that absorbed by the general public? Most interesting is the how the process of creating Holocaust memorials vary among countries and their populace; three identical monuments may engender very different meanings in Ame ...more
Chris
Dec 08, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Looks at the meaning of memorials overall, with a strong emphasis on Holocaust memorials. Really makes you take note of the landscapes around you.
Michael
Mar 23, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great analysis of Holocaust memorials, and well written and engaging!
Christopher Walls
Slow read, but chalked full of information about monuments, and their impact, throughout Europe.
Kyle
Apr 21, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Fascinating read about how we remember tragedy.
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