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TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 1: William Hartnell

(TARDIS Eruditorum #1)

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4.22  ·  Rating details ·  198 ratings  ·  15 reviews
In this newly revised and expanded first volume of essays adapted from the acclaimed blog TARDIS Eruditorum you'll find a critical history of William Hartnell's three seasons of Doctor Who. TARDIS Eruditorum tells the ongoing story of Doctor Who from its beginnings in the 1960s to the present day, pushing beyond received wisdom and fan dogma to understand that story not ...more
Paperback, 2nd, 472 pages
Published June 8th 2018 by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (first published November 9th 2011)
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Start your review of TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 1: William Hartnell (TARDIS Eruditorum, #1)
 ~Geektastic~
There are lots of fandoms out there, whole swathes of the population idolatrously dedicated to things ranging from My Little Pony to The Lord of the Rings, but I dont think any fandom has quite the ravenous, delightful insanity of Whovians. For those not in the know (and if youre reading this, I find it hard to believe that you are not), Whovians are the rabid flocks of people wholly-and sometimes scarily- dedicated to Doctor Who. I count myself among these lunatics, quite proudly, and yet there ...more
F.R.
Dec 31, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
It seems highly unlikely that Id have read this book if I wasnt:

a) a Doctor Who fan
b) somebody who has already dipped into Philip Sandifers blog Tardis Eruditorum.

(Actually, lets be fair, youd really have to be the former to do the latter.)

The thing is Ive only really dipped into the blog before, reading the new entries each week and looking up old favourite episodes. Before I purchased the book version for my Kindle, I was suspicious about whether Id want or need to read the whole thing at
...more
Dave Versace
Jan 27, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An astonishing critical rereading of the Hartnell era, encompassing the cultural context, BBC politics, political theory, occultism and every other weird thing going on in Britain and the wider world during William Hartnell's tenure as the Doctor. Culled from a collection of blog essays, Sandifer has created a remarkable body of work here, which encourages the modern Doctor Who fan to completely revise their critical viewing of the show's early years. It brings fresh insights to beloved episodes ...more
Joanne Mullen
Apr 04, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
There's a thousand books about Doctor Who, but this is one of the few which puts the programme in its social and cultural context. Moreover, it does so with such wit, erudition and verve that this book should be read by any student of Britain in the swinging sixties, as well as any self respecting Doctor Who fan. Sandifer is as playful and controversial as he is knowledgeable about both the programme and its time and so the casual reader will be as entertained as the serious fan will be ...more
Joe Martin
Nov 17, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

I started watching Doctor Who about 2 years ago. It was a vivid awakening for me. I had been very dimly aware that the show existed but had never been exposed to it. Once I started watching it, I loved it but I always wanted to know more about it. It is a story with a rich and complex history. One that I knew nothing about it.



One can, of course, try using Google to do research. With something as complex as Doctor Who, the results are rather confusing. So, I just suffered in ignorance, merely

...more
Jamie Revell
Jan 07, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: who, 1st-doctor
This collection of essays about the Hartnell era aims to look at the episodes in their historical perspective, rather than from our modern viewpoint. It claims not to be a book of reviews, although, inevitably, it does have elements of that in it.

The essays are generally interesting and well thought-out (the author has a PhD in English), and are, I would venture, often quite controversial. He doesn't just focus on the series itself, but adds essays on other topics relevant to a '60s viewpoint,
...more
Joel Aarons
Apr 07, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: doctor-who
Excellent collection of essays doing what I didn't think possible - tell me something new about Doctor Who that I hadn't thought of or didn't know. Extremely intelligently written, with a well informed knowledge of critical literacy, philosophy and the show itself. Can't wait to get stuck into future volumes!
Brandon
An interesting book about the Harnell years. I found the essays at the end less interesting than the rest of the book.
Leo H
Feb 10, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I don't want to say "Another in-depth analysis of classic Dr Who, another situation where I'm learning about far more than just Dr Who" as I did with the excellent 'About Time' series, but Phil Sandifer explicitly refers to himself as building on the work Miles & Wood did with 'About Time', so that's ok then.

'Like About Time, but turned up to eleven' is a fair if incomplete appraisal of Tardis Eruditorum, Sandifer throws out the 'guidebook' framework entirely and just writes an essay on each
...more
Daniel Kukwa
Jul 16, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: doctor-who
The first volume in what is the published version of the reviews & essays found on Philip Sandifers blog "Tardis Eruditorum", with expanded entries and extra bonus essays. This is a wonderful counter-point to the "About Time" series by Miles & Wood...primarily due to the fact that (1) I admire Phil Sandifer's prose quite a bit, and (2) it lacks the frustrating under-current of snide snarkiness that colours some of the "About Time" entries, especially when Tat Wood is writing. If youre ...more
Paul Davidson
Jan 11, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A great read

As someone who has watched Doctor Who for many years and built up a great knowledge of what happened in the show I don't need to read synopses.....I know what happened. What Phillip Sandifer does in his essays is take a much deeper look into the stories of each era and in some ways academically find themes in them that I would never see myself. I don't always agree with what he says but I find it fascinating reading to see something new that I had not considered before. Well worth a
...more
Kerry
Nov 12, 2011 marked it as dnf  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2012, ebooks, media
I've decided to make this a DNF, which isn't really true as I've read all but the new entries already on the website. It's just that I'm not feeling the need to reread them. I'm going to go on with Running Through Corridors: Rob and Toby's Marathon Watch of Doctor Who on its own instead.
Kurt Criscione
Nov 30, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
These are great blogs... good enough that i can even disagree with some of his thoughts and ideas... but that doesn't detract. He does make me want to skip a few Hartnell Serials now though... which goes against my trying to own and watch all that exists on DVD... very well written, well articulated and they dragged me in... definitely a must for true Doctor Who fans.
Iain Hamilton
Mar 12, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A brilliantly worked critical reading of the tenure of the First Doctor (William Hartnell) compiled from Sandifer's blog. Would particularly recommend to those who like/are reading the About Time series or Running Through Corridors, if only because Sandifer is prepared to take the counter view to these other excellent reads for balance. Highly recommended!
Stephen Hartwell
Brilliant and fascinating insight into the first three years of the Doctor Who story with comprehensive essays on every William Hartnell story, a few of the books and audios, as well as historical events and cultural themes of the early to mid-1960s.
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Second Edition 1 2 Apr 24, 2013 04:59PM  

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Note: This author previously published under the name Philip Sandifer.

Other books in the series

TARDIS Eruditorum (7 books)
  • TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 2: Patrick Troughton (TARDIS Eruditorum, #2)
  • TARDIS Eruditorum - A Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 3: Jon Pertwee
  • TARDIS Eruditorum - An Unofficial Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 4: Tom Baker and the Hinchcliffe Years
  • TARDIS Eruditorum - An Unofficial Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 5: Tom Baker and the Williams Years
  • TARDIS Eruditorum - An Unofficial Critical History of Doctor Who Volume 6: Peter Davison and Colin Baker
  • The Best of TARDIS Eruditorum

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