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The Sicilian Woman's Daughter

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3.89  ·  Rating details ·  70 ratings  ·  44 reviews
Most victims of the mafia are the Sicilians themselves. The role of women both as perpetrators and victims has been grossly overlooked. Until now.

As the daughter of Sicilian immigrants, in her teens Maria turns her back on her origins and fully embraces the English way of life. Notwithstanding her troubled and humble childhood in London, and backed up by her intelligence,
...more
Paperback, 296 pages
Published October 22nd 2018
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Linda Lo Hi John,
Thanks for the question.

The bike incident in my book is actually true. I was furious and kept churning the incident round in my head. I hit on…more
Hi John,
Thanks for the question.

The bike incident in my book is actually true. I was furious and kept churning the incident round in my head. I hit on the mafia idea because I thought how would they have dealt with it. It snowballed from there. I did a module on the Sicilian mafia at university and was fascinated by it.

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Average rating 3.89  · 
Rating details
 ·  70 ratings  ·  44 reviews


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Peter
Dec 03, 2018 rated it really liked it
Vendetta
The Sicilian Woman’s Daughter is an engrossing novel with menace accompanying every character, as we weave through a story of lives precariously entwined with the Mafia. There is a simmering threat and unrelenting revelation about abuse and violence, that clings to a people steeped in the DNA of the Sicilian Mafia. “You no know a thing. In England accident happen, in Sicily accident organised.”

Mary (Maria) left Sicily as a young girl with her mother and father, returning only on short t
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Lou
Oct 24, 2018 rated it really liked it
When I decided to pick this up I really had no idea what to expect from it, but the glossary of characters and of Italian terminology included at the very front made me rather nervous as it usually indicates that you will need to refer back to them to keep the story straight in your head. However, I was pleasantly surprised that rarely was it necessary to flip back to that section whilst reading, and I ended up forgetting about it completely.

Refreshingly original, emotive and with a number of un
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Julie Parks
Aug 06, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: general-fiction
This is a book that deserves a thorough read and I'm afraid that cover isn't doing it the intrigue it needs.

Firstly, I wanted to get my hands on this because of the research. The Sicilian mafia, the Italian roots of someone who's grown up in London. Bam! Perfect match.

But then the story starts flowing and is easy to follow and you find yourself carrying a lot more than you'd expected.

I mean what do I know about what it feels to grow up surrounded by the mafia?

Actually...

While teaching English i
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Adele Shea
I really wanted to like this book but it just didn't grab my attention and keep it. The concept of it was really good but I felt some of the story didn't need to be in it.
I am glad this book has alot of better reviews than mine and hope it does well.
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Thebooktrail
Jun 22, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

An interesting and thought provoking read this one.Mary also known as Maria has two identities - an Italian one and a British one. She now lives in London but returns to the place known as The Village, in Sicily to unpack the mysteries of her past.

She’s living a troubled life, not feeling part of the world she’s now in - She’s known not by her name by many but as “the Sicilian woman’s daughter” and this separation of identities and anonymity is crushing to read about.

Maria tells her story of her
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Tina
Jul 10, 2018 rated it liked it
This book didn't grab me completely and I put it down a few times.  I like the cover and sometimes that's the eye candy that draws you to a book. 

This is one of those multi-generational stories and you learn about the women's role in the Mafia families.  One of the main characters is Mary and honestly, I didn't care for her much.  Therefore, it was hard to read about her vengeful side and her actions. There were so many characters listed at the beginning of the book that I thought I may have tro
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emmabbooks
Jun 20, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Sicilian Mafia Family

Living in London Maria (Mary) has sought to escape her Sicilian roots keeping her family history away from her English husband and her children. However a cup of tea with her Sicilian aunt results in her being draw her back to her roots, and the mafia connections.

Maria tells her story, her memories of her mother, the visits to Sicily and family there. An enthralling glimpse into another world where grandmothers keep a gun close to hand, and it pays to be very respectful to
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Bookread2day
Jul 19, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I've been waiting a long time for this paperback book to be released, finally it's here. The story is very different from I ever imagined it would be and one of a story that's is so much better than I thought. Four generations of Mafia women. There may be a lot of families within the setting for this story , but there is an index page of characters explains everyone, this makes its easier to know who is who and also who is related to who. What an opener the prologue was. Ziuzza, a grandmother, w ...more
Alex
I received an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

3.5/5 stars

This book was unlike what I usually read, but I love women-focused stories about generations, and I also have a weakness for well-written and interesting mafia/gangster stories.

In the end, I came away with mixed feelings. I loved all the intricacies of the family, the way they couldn't even trust each other, the way the main character surprised me as the story went on, and the ending as well. I can't really say much
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Heena Rathore P.
Mar 30, 2019 rated it really liked it
The Sicilian Woman's Daughter by Linda Lo Scuro is a very gripping book with a well-written plot and a beautiful cast of strong characters. This book was a very quick read and had a lot more to offer to its reader that one can imagine. This book is very culturally rich and it was great to get a detailed glimpse into the family of mobs and also witnessing the repercussions of belonging to such a family.

I enjoyed reading this book from start to end, mainly because the writing was good and had a ve
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Mary
Jun 25, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book was an ARC from Net Galley. I enjoyed it very much!

The story was pleasing and easy to follow. When I started the book I read all the characters and got very confused and thought I would lose a lot trying to keep everyone together to get to the end of the book, not so. It was written in just such a way that it was easy to follow all the players.

Maria grew up in England and Sicily with a mother who was very mean to her. Her mother would hit and beat her at very change she had. Maria's Au
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patrick Lorelli
Mar 06, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: suspense
A very good story and one that I am sure some people can relate to. Mary (Maria) is the focus of the story and after being retired for some time she has decided to spend some time with an Aunt of hers. They live in England having emigrated from Sicily and Marie really only has this Aunt left as a family, having married an English banker. While being around her Aunt she is noticing that her Aunt is like some of the older women of the village that she grew up in. The Aunt speaks a lot of what happ ...more
Janet
Jul 16, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher ---
Most victims of the mafia are the Sicilians themselves. The role of women both as perpetrators and victims has been grossly overlooked. Until now.
As the daughter of Sicilian immigrants, in her teens, Maria turns her back on her origins and fully embraces the English way of life. Notwithstanding her troubled and humble childhood in London, and backed up by her intelligenc
...more
Joyce
Jul 15, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Maria was born in Sicily and grew up in The Village surrounded by family. Her parents left Sicily when Maria was a teen and emigrated to England. One of her mother's sisters also left The Village and moved to England as well with her children. Maria, now known as Mary, wanted to leave her past behind and assimilated into the culture of England. She was successful in her career, married and had two children, not telling her family about her past or family in Sicily. Mary is now retired and has so ...more
Doris Wiggins
Jul 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Maria is Siscillian. Not something she is proud of. She can't wait to leave Sicily and move to England. She accomplishes this at the age of eighteen. She's had to go through an arranged marriage, beatings, and being subjected to harsh conditions by her family. She's divorced and has married the man of her dream. She is far from her mafioso family. Yes, Mafioso!! She is in it up to her neck, no matter how much she tries to forget her roots.
It seems like the abusive men of her family seem to be d
...more
Tiffany Rose
Jul 18, 2018 rated it liked it
This was an interesting read about a girl whose family is involved in the mafia and her want to not be involved in it. She goes to England to escape her family ties in Sicily. I found this a quick read.

I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a free copy in exchange for my honest and unbiased review of it.
Kimberly Hicks
Oct 05, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
Recommended to Kimberly by: Net Galley
Shelves: read-on-kindle
This is a story told through Maria’s perspective. She takes you through her past and slowly brings you up to speed on the present. Some of Maria’s family appears to be a little envious of her, seeing as how she has a pretty decent life she lives, and it is within that time that she learns something awful from her Aunt Zia about their family. As the reader continues to follow Maria’s journey, it will become clear which side she embraces.

I must say the title of the book sounded very intriguing and
...more
Dawn D'auvin
Jul 09, 2018 rated it really liked it
As I read this book I felt I was reading a true account of how ordinary lives can be turned upside down by family connections we try to remove ourselves from (in this case the Mafia). Insightful, well written and I found the pace just right. The storyline took an interesting twist at the end which didn’t disappoint.
S
Sep 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this book in exchange for a review.

I started reading this book without knowing what to expect and I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed this book.

This book is about a woman who has been living with two identities. On one hand she is Mary who lives in London with her English family, on the other she is Maria the daughter of Sicilian immigrants who come to England and it's a side to life that she has been trying to k
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Carolyn Bowen
Jun 23, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
From the get-go (catchy title), The Sicilian Women’s Daughter delivers an exciting multigenerational story. I enjoy reading fast-paced novels steeped in cultural drama. This one fulfills my love for mysteries and intrigue.

Linda Lo Scuro weaves the story about the daughter of Sicilian immigrants with layer upon layer of substance. Soak up the history and ride the turbulent waves of discovery as Maria learns about herself and the roles of women in the Sicilian families.

The novel “the Sicilian wo
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Phil Rowan
Jul 05, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
The Sicilian Woman's Daughter by Linda Lo Scuro – To be published by Sparkling Books in November 2018

Wow – this is a great story!
We start with Maria (Mary) presently in the UK, who feels that she is caught between two cultures -Sicilian and British - although she hasn't been back home to her Sicilian village for over four decades. Having migrated to London as a child she now reads The Times, the Economist and the Financial Times. She has also joined the UK Conservative Party, and occasionally i
...more
Millie Thom
Jul 28, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I found this an engrossing read and an excellent first novel from Linda Lo Scuro. Told in first person by the protagonist, Maria, the story explores the role of women in the Sicilian Mafia: a role, until now, unknown and/or unspoken of.
Having come to live in London as a teen, Maria is determined to leave her impoverished and unhappy Sicilian childhood behind and make a good life for herself in a city where opportunities abound for intelligent and good-looking girls like Mary (as she is called i
...more
Andrea
Sep 03, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Vaffanculo..................I love the word as much as I love this book. Talk about attitude! Sicilian women are a surprising bunch according to Linda Lo Scuro's book "The Sicilian Woman's Daughter". Abused, scheming, vindictive, connected, murderous, victims and victors.

I loved discovering the story of Maria aka Mary who came from a poor Sicilian background to recreate herself in England as a successful and wealthy teacher and wife to a high flier bank executive.
She has just retired and with mo
...more
Mani
Aug 02, 2018 rated it really liked it
A very interesting and thought provoking book. This book is full of cultural drama, which  I really enjoyed.

This book is about a woman who has been living with two identities. One as Mary who lives in London with her English family and the other as an Italian , a life that she has been trying to keep secret from her English family for over 30 years. (Don’t want to give anymore away)

The book is well written and flows consistently through to the end. This makes the book easy to read.  It is writte
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Sara Wingfield
Jan 10, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Posted on Zerofiltersaurus.wordpress.com on 11/1/19-

The plot, in a nutshell: Mary/Maria has a pleasant life with a loving husband and children, from whom she has kept secret her mother’s side of her family, who are Sicilian mafia. They are thrust into her life and she becomes involved in some terrible situations, drawn further and further into dangerous territory that puts everyone she loves at risk.

The things I loved about it: Mary’s identity is formed from drastically different parts of her l
...more
GripLitGrl
Aug 09, 2018 rated it really liked it
I really enjoyed Linda Lo Scuro style of writing it was like peaking into Maria's diary sometimes others it felt as intimate as having a conversation with Maria about her life. What an interesting life!

Lo Scuro has Maria take you on a wonderful journey from London to Sicily & back. Maria spent her childhood growing up in Sicily wanting to leave her life there & everyone behind. She finds her way out & begins her new life having her own a family & career detaching from her family in Sicily & her
...more
Henk-Jan van der Klis
Family ties can be strong. The Sicilian Woman's Daughter shows how four generations of mafia women both protect and destroy. Maria, the protagonist, is a daughter of Sicilian immigrants to the British society. Where Maria herself seems to prefer settling in the UK and marries a local, her mother and grandma still pull. Illustrated in very Italian English, pull. Returning to The Village on Sicily is accompanied by three funerals and no wedding in sight. Women acting as perpetrators and victims of ...more
GripLitGrl
Aug 09, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I really enjoyed Linda Lo Scuro style of writing it was like peaking into Maria's diary sometimes others it felt as intimate having a conversation with Maria about her life. What an interesting life!

Lo Scuro has Maria take you on a wonderful journey from London to Sicily & back. Maria spent her childhood growing up in Sicily wanting to leave her life there & everyone behind. She finds her way out & begins her new life having her own a family & career detaching from her family in Sicily & her roo
...more
Angela
Jul 27, 2018 rated it liked it
Mary (Maria) lives in England with her English husband, she is Sicilian born but has tried very hard to distance herself from her family ties back in Sicily. She has had a successful career and two children who know nothing of her past and is now retired.

Mary reluctantly agrees to accompany her cousin on a visit to Sicily and she decides to go with her husband and adult children, with their spouses. An eventful trip ensues for the entire family as old relationships are reformed.

An interesting in
...more
Nancy Mijangos
Sep 03, 2018 rated it really liked it
I received an ARC of this novel from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Lots of murder in this hilarious book about a Sicilian family who emigrated to London. I enjoyed the novel.
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