Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “No Country Woman” as Want to Read:
No Country Woman
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

No Country Woman

by
4.05  ·  Rating details ·  91 ratings  ·  21 reviews
A fresh and exciting feminist memoir about what it means to never feel at home where you live.

'I was born in a hospital in Suva, Fiji. I can't recall ever seeing the building on my trips back to the city, first as a child or later as an adult. I imagine it in shades of blue and brown, the plastic waiting room chairs covered in the fine film of moisture that creeps over eve
...more
Paperback, 272 pages
Published August 14th 2018 by Hachette Australia
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about No Country Woman, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about No Country Woman

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Veronica
Jun 16, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: biography
Full of wisdom, resilience, passion and insight, this is an excellent and highly readable memoir-slash-essay-collection by a brilliant young writer.
Jaclyn Crupi
Jun 08, 2018 rated it really liked it
Patel explores migrant guilt, female friendship and vegetarianism in ways I could strongly relate to. She interrogates race and religion in an intelligent and engaging manner through a feminist lens. Her hyphenated life as a Fijian-Indian-Australian is the central focus of the book and I thought she teased out the facets of each part of her identity in thought-provoking and illuminating ways. I devoured this memoir and felt the second half was particularly strong. Also, we all need a friend like ...more
Sharon
Jul 21, 2018 rated it really liked it
In No Country Woman, Patel tackles so many unspoken issues it’s the sort of book you’ll need to let soak, and turn back to over and again. As the title suggests, this is a rich memoir exploring identity and not belonging, spanning questions about race, feminism, national identity and family.

This is Patel’s debut, but she is well-known in the Canberra community as the founder of Feminartsy, a website dedicated to promoting women’s writing and experiences. This memoir did feel more like an in-dept
...more
Sonia Nair
Jun 08, 2018 rated it really liked it
In her razor-sharp debut, No-Country Woman: A Memoir of Not Belonging, Fijian-Indian-Australian writer Zoya Patel charts the chasm that results from juggling three cultures at once, never completely belonging to any of them yet constantly being aware of how each has informed her identity.

Read the rest of my review here on Books+Publishing: https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au...
Yen Tso
Aug 22, 2018 rated it it was amazing
No Country Woman is a story of culture, identity and not belonging.

In this set of compelling contemporary memoir essays Patel artfully blends together personal narrative with insightful social political analysis.

She takes the emotion of the micro and acute experiences of racism, and contextualizes them in large scale context of the macro critique.

Patel invites us into her life, her family, her relationships and shows us her struggles with living a hyphenated life as a Fijian-Indian-Australian
...more
Jessica M
Aug 10, 2018 rated it liked it
http://jessjustreads.com

No Country Woman by Zoya Patel is a feminist memoir about what it means to never feel at home where you live.

Zoya Patel is the founder of Feminartsy and is a Fijian-Indian writer. She’s based in Canberra and moved to Australia when she was very little. No Country Woman is an exploration of her heritage, culture and place in this country.

"I was born in a hospital in Suva, Fiji. …It is not a place I've thought of often, but I think of it now and wonder how it has shaped me.
...more
Michael Livingston
Aug 20, 2018 rated it liked it
I wanted to like this a bit more than I did - Patel is an engaging memoirist, writing with candour and thoughtfulness about life between cultures - but there were times it felt like a loosely connected set of memoir-y essays rather than a really strong and coherent narrative. That's fine of course, but then you want the essays to dig a bit deeper - if you're going to write a chapter about vegetarianism, than I want something a bit more involved and thought-provoking. This is all a bit critical - ...more
Aneesha
Aug 22, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Loved this book!! As a migrant it really resonated with experiences I have had! And there was a light atmosphere that didn’t make it overwhelming to read.
Melissa
Aug 06, 2018 rated it it was amazing
No Country Woman is nuanced, thoughtful, thought-provoking and unapologetic.

To understand what the experiences of migrant communities and people of colour can look like in Australia (crucially not what the experiences of every person of colour will look like – because as Patel reminds us, this is her personal story, not just a new stereotype) we need to start listening to diverse voices. This richly detailed, relentlessly thorough, and rewarding memoir is a very good place to start.

Touching wh
...more
Simon Leeds
Aug 04, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Zoya Patel’s memoir takes the form of a collection of essays, each exploring a topic that has influenced her life growing up in Australia after having moved here from Fiji at a young age.

From exploring experiences of systemic racism in Australia to becoming engaged in Canberra’s arts scene and turning vegetarian, the underlying theme that emerges is of the complexity of the experience of growing up as a first or second generation migrant in Australia in the 21st century. Amongst the serious top
...more
Harinder
Sep 30, 2018 rated it really liked it
Reading this book was an extraordinary experience for me. But for places, dates and names, many of the experiences that Patel describes of growing up as a migrant in Australia (and in Canberra!) of Indian descent could have been my story. She is incredibly honest in describing her reactions to these events - which is where we often differ - but the experiences are the same. I had so many moments of recognition reading this book. The assumption that she doesn't speak English; assumptions about ho ...more
Carey Lonsdale
Oct 05, 2018 rated it really liked it
It wasn’t the title that made me want to read this book – it was the author’s name. I was familiar with Zoya Patel’s writing and editing through her work on the Feminartsy website, and with her work supporting programs that promote respect and aim to prevent domestic violence.

In this book Zoya gives voice to her thoughts about growing up in Australia and how that played out against he Indian-Fijian background. Zoya describes experiences that many of us would otherwise never imagine, and she ana
...more
Shari
Dec 27, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: owned-books
As great, insightful memoir - a story that reflects and overlaps my own in many ways, it was refreshing and affirming to read a feminist memoir by a WOC. I’ve loved many feminist memoirs (think Clem Ford, Caitlin Moran) but their tales of growing up were so removed from my own experience that I longed to read something about being a brown feminist in a white landscape. Patel achieves this, as well as exploring the complex nuances of navigating the Fijian-Indian identity, something I’ve seen my f ...more
Carey Lonsdale
Nov 18, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It wasn’t the title that made me want to read this book – it was the author’s name. I was familiar with Zoya Patel’s writing and editing through her work on the Feminartsy website, and with her work supporting programs that promote respect and aim to prevent domestic violence.

In this book Zoya gives voice to her thoughts about growing up in Australia with an Indian-Fijian background. She describes experiences that many of us would otherwise never be able to imagine, and analyses and conveys the
...more
Tabitha B
Sep 02, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This was a great read. Enlightening and entertaining, while providing a positive framework for societal change.

I would strongly encourage all Australians to read this book as a stark wake-up call to what our nation is like for people of colour. And non-Australians should be reading it to understand the diversity of our national experience, as it is a more accurate depiction of modern Australia than most Australians would be willing to acknowledge. This book is not anti-Australia either - there
...more
jamandcrumpets
Jan 11, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I thoroughly appreciated the way Patel explains her experience and its many complexities and contradictions. A really honest and forensic exploration of her emotions and history through a very considered feminist lens. Along with the many different layers of identities she interrogates, I resonated with the background hum of what it might mean to be (your own history +) a Canberran in this generation.
Rowan Jackson
Dec 05, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Delightfully insightful! An exceedingly candid and accessible unpacking of issues of race, gender, religion and heritage as well as the complex space where they intersect. A handbook which taught me, a privileged white male, that sometimes the best action is to leave my voice out of it and let someone else's voice be heard.
Julia
Aug 25, 2018 rated it really liked it
3.5
Emma
Dec 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
An absolutely excellent memoir on the exploration of identity, race, religion, culture and feminism. Thank you for sharing such intimate moments and feelings from your life. 💕💕💕💕
Georgia
Dec 02, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: non-fiction-18
4.5 stars. The essay about the authors relationship with water was one of the best essays I've read.
Joelle
read the world: Fiji
Alexandra
rated it it was amazing
Sep 01, 2018
BrutallyHonest
rated it really liked it
Sep 06, 2018
Ella
rated it liked it
Jan 05, 2019
Rachel Patterson
rated it it was amazing
Oct 12, 2018
Emily
rated it really liked it
Sep 30, 2018
Inga
rated it really liked it
Nov 12, 2018
Virisila
rated it really liked it
Aug 22, 2018
Estee
rated it really liked it
Sep 16, 2018
Ana Maria
rated it really liked it
Nov 02, 2018
« previous 1 3 4 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »