Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information” as Want to Read:
Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information

4.23  ·  Rating details ·  47 ratings  ·  6 reviews
Is anything ever not an interpretation? Does interpretation go all the way down? Is there such a thing as a pure fact that is interpretation-free? If not, how are we supposed to know what to think and do?

These tantalizing questions are tackled by renowned American thinker John D. Caputo in this wide-reaching exploration of what the traditional term 'hermeneutic
...more
Paperback, 358 pages
Published 2018 by Pelican
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Hermeneutics, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Hermeneutics

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.23  · 
Rating details
 ·  47 ratings  ·  6 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information
Tyler
Aug 26, 2018 rated it really liked it
An excellent introduction to Hermeneutics and Deconstruction, which relies on little prior knowledge, and provides fantastic application to the modern information age.
Harvey Molloy
Apr 14, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
How much do you know about Gadamer? (Before this book I knew little). For those of us who probably read far too much post-structuralism for our own good in grad school, Caputo — a professor of Religion Emeritus — charts an engaging course through Heidegger, Gadamer, Rorty , Vattimo before arriving at Tillich. He gives an insightful reading of Derrida, focusing on the often ignored section on 'the exorbitant' in Of Grammatology. He's a little soft on the later Derrida (who suffers from a little too much soufflée in h ...more
Tom Pepper
Jul 19, 2019 rated it liked it
Caputo defends the school of thought, quite popular today, that suggests that absolutely everything is open to interpretation. He defines the hermeneutical position this way: “Interpretations go all the way down but some interpretations are better than others”(5). He insists there are no such things as the “naked fact of the matter”(4). All we have are various interpretations. Then how, exactly, can one be better? Here’s his explanation of this apparent paradox:

“Even our firmest trut
...more
E.
Oct 29, 2019 rated it it was ok
There were two chapters I really enjoyed and learned from, one about Vattimo and Rorty and the other about how a group of Canadian health care workers applied Gadamerian hermeneutics to their work. Otherwise I didn't care much for the book. Too much of it was simply an introduction to Heidegger, Derrida, etc. But often with a tone that was too clever by half and therefore off-putting. I kept hoping that the book was going to break new ground and speak to our cultural (read Trumpian) moment as in ...more
Jo
Oct 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: philosophy
Wow! It’s well over a decade since I last read any John D. Caputo, and this has made we want to go back and reread the books of his that I have on my shelves. I really enjoyed this. It was good to refresh my memory on hermeneutical things, and it was interesting and helpful relating it all to present day issues. I love this stuff, it is so stimulating, it has me on the edge of my seat ruminating on the implications, and Caputo’s writing style is so accessible.
Sevin
Jun 10, 2019 rated it it was amazing
This got me so excited!! About life!! How cool is hermeneutics?!
Adam Gurri
rated it really liked it
Jun 14, 2018
Matthew Lowery
rated it it was amazing
May 03, 2019
Greg
rated it it was amazing
Aug 19, 2018
Tegan
rated it really liked it
Dec 08, 2018
Steve Traves
rated it really liked it
Jun 17, 2018
Harnold
rated it it was amazing
Sep 29, 2018
Paul
rated it really liked it
Oct 07, 2019
GCB
rated it it was amazing
Sep 22, 2019
Giraffe
rated it liked it
Aug 29, 2019
Bill Tyne
rated it really liked it
Mar 27, 2018
Hunter Tidwell
rated it really liked it
Jul 27, 2019
Jussi Halonen
rated it it was ok
May 25, 2018
Taco Hidde Bakker
rated it it was amazing
Mar 18, 2018
Ryan Bowen
rated it really liked it
Apr 15, 2019
Marvin
rated it really liked it
Nov 19, 2018
Will Harlan
rated it it was amazing
Feb 22, 2019
Thomasmcintosh
rated it it was amazing
Dec 25, 2018
David
rated it liked it
May 07, 2018
Dodopan
rated it really liked it
Aug 11, 2019
Jackie
rated it it was amazing
May 25, 2018
Stella
rated it really liked it
Jul 28, 2018
Joris
rated it it was amazing
Aug 23, 2019
Corey Hampton
rated it it was amazing
Jul 02, 2018
Colin Heber-Percy
rated it it was amazing
May 09, 2019
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • A Death in the Family
  • The Affirmation
  • How to Be Human in the Digital Economy
  • Duty Free Art: Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War
  • The Holy Spirit & Preaching
  • Selected Writings from Mikhail Bakunin
  • Euthydemus
  • Notes on Nationalism
  • Funerals Without God: A practical guide to humanist and non-religious funeral ceremonies
  • The Funeral Celebrant's Handbook
  • Don't Call Us Dead
  • Non-Religious Funeral Readings
  • Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?
  • Why I Write
  • Stillness Is the Key
  • The Collectors (His Dark Materials, #0.6)
  • The Diary of a Hounslow Girl
  • Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story
See similar books…
82 followers
John D. Caputo is an American philosopher who is the Thomas J. Watson Professor of Religion Emeritus at Syracuse University and the David R. Cook Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Villanova University. Caputo is a major figure associated with Postmodern Christianity, Continental Philosophy of Religion, as well as the founder of the theological movement known as weak theology. Much of Caputo's wo ...more