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The Face of a Monster: America's Frankenstein
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The Face of a Monster: America's Frankenstein

4.80  ·  Rating details ·  5 ratings  ·  5 reviews

The year 2018 will herald the 200th anniversary of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. The timing seems right for the story of a real monster. German-born immigrant Anton Probst arrived in New York in 1863. Within two hours of his arrival he enlisted in the Union Army. During the American Civil War, Probst bore witness to mankind's brutali

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Kindle Edition, 258 pages
Published March 11th 2018 by Russell D. Earnest Associates
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4.80  · 
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Bibiana Krall
Apr 17, 2019 rated it it was amazing
The Face of a Monster: America's Frankenstein By Patricia Earnest Suter can be succinctly summed up by this sentence, “Over the course of researching and writing The Face of a Monster: America’s Frankenstein, I found that monsters exist and that my childhood belief was right. They almost always adopt human form.”

American history is interwoven in a compelling, comparative essay to Mary Shelley’s masterpiece, Frankenstein. On what make us leap from rule followers to rule breaker, then violent murd
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William Hahn
Apr 18, 2018 rated it really liked it
This book is the kind of tale that grips you and shows you something, the way you would expect from a novel. Yet it is also a textbook, simply packed with well-researched information and tons of scholarly notes. Ms. Suter writes about... well everything really. The story of a mass-killer here in the Philadelphia area is mingled with eerie parallels to the eternal tale of Frankenstein written a half-century earlier. Woven into the loom are thoughts on the Civil War, on German immigration, the jus ...more
Veronica Barton
Dec 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
What drives a person to become a monster? A psychological question that has been studied and analyzed for centuries. Author Suter does a masterful job of delving into the history of one of the early mass murderer's in American history, detailing the story of Anton Probst, a German immigrant who brutally slaughters an entire family. She innovatively compares and contrasts his story and environment with the life and writings of Mary Shelley on the 200th anniversary of her classic tale Frankenstein ...more
Mark Schultz
Aug 18, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I finally read Mary Shelley’s book, “Frankenstein”, about 5 years ago and I really enjoyed it, far more than the movies. So, I was quite interested in reading Patricia Earnest Suter’s book, thinking it was another novel.
I was very pleasantly surprised to realize my assumption was wrong, it was a comparison of the nameless monster created by Dr. Frankenstein and an American mass murderer in Philadelphia. Even though the subject matter is quite grisly, the brutal death of a family, the writing is
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Kerri Davidson
Mar 06, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I bought this book thinking it would be just another account of the inner workings of a criminal mind.
What the author has done however, is woven a tale comparing this mass murderer to the monster from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.
Thoroughly enjoyable AND educational.
The amount of detailed research that clearly went into creating this book is mind boggling.
I particularly enjoyed the author’s additional focus on the dark nature of mob mentality and media sensationalism. “Monsters” in their own ri
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Tabatha Shipley
marked it as to-read
May 02, 2019
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