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Inadvertent

(Lese, skrive (Forlaget Oktober) #3)

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  655 ratings  ·  99 reviews
The Why I Write series is based on the Windham-Campbell Lectures, delivered annually to commemorate the awarding of the Donald Windham–Sandy M. Campbell Literature Prizes at Yale University. Administered by Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, the series publishes works based on the lecture given by the event’s keynote speaker.
 
The series launched in 2017 wi
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Hardcover, 104 pages
Published September 4th 2018 by Yale University Press
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Average rating 4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  655 ratings  ·  99 reviews


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Lee Klein
Oct 12, 2018 rated it really liked it
Reads almost like a re-mixed excerpt from My Struggle Book Five’s parts about writing. A typo on page 7 (“than” instead of “that”) on a page about trust made me distrust this one’s publication at first, thinking it a little money-grubby, but that slight initial sense fell away as the old familiar voice and progress through internal and external worlds established themselves. No one mentions KOK in the same breath as Kerouac, even if both were deeply inspired by Proust and KOK's "inadvertent" met ...more
Darwin8u
Nov 17, 2018 rated it really liked it
"Thoughts are the enemy of the inadvertent, for if one thinks about how something will seem to others, if one thinks about if something is important or good enough, if one begins to calculate or pretend, then it is no longer inadvertent and accessable as itself, but only as what we have made it into."
- Karl Ove Knausgaard, Inadvertent

description

The second book published in the Windam-Campbell and Yale Press series 'Why I Write'. This short book is the lecture Knausgaard gave at the 2017 Windam-Campbell Pr
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Erin Rouleau
Mar 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I might be in love with this man, or at the very least he feels like such a kindred soul. I've tried to inadequately articulate too many times, what he so gracefully did below:

“[Vincent Van Gogh] was on fire, driven by an intense will to communicate his inner world to the outer one, but the resistance was too great, the language he had access to was incapable of expressing it. But his will was as wild as it was blind, little by little the distance was whittled away, until he produced his final
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Campbell
Oct 28, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: non-fiction, writing
Karl Ove discourses on why he writes. He doesn't answer the question, but the way in which he didn't answer it was interesting and engaging.

Edited: for clarity
Ailsa
Apr 09, 2020 rated it it was amazing

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"Literature is not primarily a place for truths, it is the space truths play out." 2
"... literature by its very nature always seeks complexity and ambiguity, and that monologic claims of truth about the world are antiliterary" 12
"When I was a boy I read an enormous quantity of books, my sole object being to get away from the reality I was living in -- in other words, pure and simple escapism. "15
"The mere fact that he knew what he liked impressed me. I liked what I had been taught t
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Philippe
Feb 16, 2020 rated it liked it
Shelves: art, biography
Another dip in Knausgaard's universe. Previously I only read his excursion on Munch and the present booklet could be read as a corollary to the former. Because the question why Munch painted, and why he did as he did, is basically the same as the one that is on the table here: why does one write? Here as there we are intrigued and revitalised by the reading, but unsure what exactly has been said. Very present is the soothing voice of an intelligent and affable man, a perfect stranger, but vulner ...more
M. Sarki
Jul 07, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 5-star-wonders
https://rogueliterarysociety.com/f/in...

Read this short book on writing and you just might become, if you aren't already, an instant fan of Karl Ove Knausgård. The quotations below give unguarded insight into the gems included in this lengthy essay. Greatness never came easy for KOK, and the anecdotes in this book prove his dismal failure at first and finally the relevant reasons he finally succeeded in writing meaningful words on the page. It is not surprising that the act of reading was instru
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Anatoly Molotkov
Jun 04, 2019 rated it it was amazing
"For many years I followed these rules of writing, that one shouldn't psychologize and that one shouldn't tell, but show. ... It wasn't until I started breaking the rules .... that my writing came alive." An ambiguous and multifaceted statement about the choice to write.
Sushma Manava
Mar 27, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: read-2019
Inadvertent is Karl’s attempt to answer the very complex question about why he writes and it was an absolute delight to read and gave me an insight into his beautiful writing albeit translated. In this discussion he touches upon reading and why we read too and I’m onboard with all the reasons.
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This man is very talented. I’ve watched some videos of him speak on stage. This essay would come to life and would be been a whole different experience if he actually gave it as a speech. Nonetheless i was
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Carrie Poppy
Jun 25, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Wonderful
Reid
Nov 17, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This book is like a slight touch of profundity, if you ask me. What he writes here, about spontaneous non-self-conscious prose writing, smacks heavily of Zen Buddhism and the illusion of free will. He might as well say, and pretty much does say, that he enters the zone and becomes the word, becomes the flow of words. The thoughts and words flow out of him in automatic fashion and only when they're on the page does he realize what he's written: to whit, in near-summation on the 2nd to last page: ...more
Dylan Perry
Jan 26, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Reread: May 2020
5/5
Inadvertent was lodged in my head for more than a year. I'm glad to see it lives up to the memory of the first read, and exceeds it.


Original Review: January 2019
The honesty on display here is raw, real, and appreciated. Because as interesting as the highs are—the success stories, breaking out as an author and gaining acolytes—to me, the creative lows are just as fascinating. And Karl Ove Knausgaard doesn’t hold back. He goes into detail about the years that went in between pro
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Garrett Zecker
Apr 14, 2020 rated it it was amazing

"...I myself was so removed from the world, I was never really in it - perhaps because I had once benefited from protecting myself against it, and had never come out of my defensive position - and in literature I had found a way in. That is why presence and closeness were always what I sought there." (36)





Inadvertent is the second of the Windham-Campbell lectures that I have read, the first being Patti Smith’s Devotion – an equally beautiful meditation on the art and interiority of the writing li

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Moeen
Jul 30, 2020 rated it it was ok
This was my second attempt to read Knausgård (after going through 200 pages of My Struggle). I see what he’s trying to do, writing as flat as possible, leveling everything (emotions, ideas, memories) to give us intellectual experience of some kind of depth-in-flatness. And yes, there are some brilliant parts. But it just doesn’t work for me. Once you get the idea, the whole depth-in-flatness thing shows its shallowness.
ريم الصالح
Oct 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I enjoyed this book! Wow!
Not long ago, I have read My Struggle by Knausgaard and I can say that it wasn't my cup of tea -if I might say- I couldn't even complete the first book! But after I read Inadvertent by the same author, I can say that this man can surely bring out the best of him when you just simply ask him: Why do you write?

The writing was simple yet connects to the reader instantly! Karl makes you feel as if you both knew each other for a very long time, sitting in a cosy café, talkin
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Melting Uncle
Oct 29, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: finished2018
So nice I listened to the audiobook twice.
I think this would actually be a good first book if you've never read this author.
Lots of cool KOK anecdotes including his attempt to watch Game of Thrones.
I can't think of anything negative to say about this!
Kirsten
[2018] In this essay, the author addresses, "why I write." By the end of it, I still don't think either of us knows, but it doesn't matter, I just loved reading him riff on it.
elisabeth
Jun 02, 2019 rated it really liked it
shamefully, I'm yet to read one of knausgaard's works, but this essay was enough to convince me to change that. i've been studying literary theory this year for a class, and i've struggled to find any of it interesting or engaging - semiotics, myth, yada yada yada - it's not working for me. i just don't see why you would volunteer to take a clinical approach to literature, something so magical in its ability to transport readers into different realities, new spheres of understanding. what's the ...more
Keen
Jun 13, 2019 rated it really liked it

Knausgaard is one of those writers who I have read lots about, in particular his Seasons Quartet. I have read at least one long form interview with him and he certainly seemed like an interesting enough character, but this is the first time I have got round to reading his work.

I enjoyed the way he captured the feel and mood of his childhood reading experiences, the way he would get immersed and lost in comic books for days and in particular his memories of reading Ursula K. Le Guin and the music
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Danny
Jun 17, 2019 rated it really liked it
I've now read four of Knausgaard's books, none of them from his "My Struggle" series, but I'm enthralled with the work I've encountered, and this book, about why he writes, which does not entirely even answer the question, is as engaging as the others. His thoughts about art, and the literary struggle between that which is empathetic and that which is cerebral, and his thoughts about letting go of inhibitions and "the rules" and driving towards authenticity, are all noble in their own way, and I ...more
Kathleen Flynn
About writing. Brief yet fascinating. Sent me to Borges and also makes me want to read rest of In Search of Lost Time. And of course A Wizard of Earthsea.

I haven't read all of the volumes of My Struggle but I would like to. Yes, he's very hyped but there is something very special about this writer too.
Yeganeh Attari
Aug 22, 2020 rated it it was amazing
"I myself was so removed from the world, I was never really in it - perhaps because I had once benefited from protecting myself against it, and had never come out of my defensive position - and in literature I had found a way in."

Thanks for letting us in too, sir.
James
Dec 06, 2018 rated it really liked it
It has a slow start, and a sudden ending, but overall it’s enjoyable to read Knausgaard’s thoughts on why he writes, or what led him to write in the way he does.
Aleyna Saral
Dec 29, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Tom
Sep 16, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This essay could stand as an out-take from My Struggle: Knausgaard reflecting on why he does what he does, (sometimes) who gets hurt, and what the whole point of that is.
Warren Ward
Jan 25, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: writing
This essay cuts to the heart of what writing is with the clarity of a diamond. Knausgaard talks about his failures and successes in trying to write authentically without artifice or pretension. His method involves stripping away all hindrances to capturing the truth of a moment or an experience. He also writes eloquently about the ways that culture and common beliefs shape the way we see the world, literally constructing the world we inhabit. He touches on how science, for example, colours the w ...more
Thomas
Aug 27, 2020 rated it really liked it
In many ways, this works really well as an introduction to Knausgaard. You can find the recorded version of the lecture online. Really enjoyed it, but I've got a problem, so you probably shouldn't trust my judgment on his stuff anymore.
"The reason this text is so temporizing and evasive is of course that I don’t quite know why I write, nor quite what writing is. I don’t think anyone really does, to be honest, at least not in such a way that it can be fully accounted for. Whom is one addressing w
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Bob
Aug 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Inadvertent is the 2018 lecture delivered by Karl Knausgaard as part of the “Why I Write” Series at Yale University. 92 pages of chiseled prose about how writers accidentally-on-purpose make writing happen.

There is no one answer, of course. In a series of attempts, or in French, assays, he works his way around the question. Only inadvertently, Knausgaard says, is how writers achieve their ends. If you know exactly where you think you want to go and precisely to get there…then you don’t get it.

pa
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Krystina
Dec 15, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is an incredible essay in which the author answers the question, “why do I write?” He thinks back to his childhood love of reading, how when he read, he was alone but never felt it. How there are spans of his childhood that are “memoryless” (oh gosh, that word alone had me putting my hand to my heart), yet he can remember the day he was playing in the snow and his mother came home and gave him what would be his favorite book and he remembers reading it right away and connecting with the cha ...more
Brenda
Oct 07, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: memoir
I need to buy a copy of this book so I may freely highlight the many passages and thoughts that jumped out at me. I’ve never read anything by this author, but have heard of him.

I found myself deeply fascinated by what he explained, as he tried to successfully describe why he writes, and found this tiny book full of so much insight to be a revelation and sadly, much too short!

As someone who has tried to write throughout my life, faced self-doubt and crippling block, most of the time self-inflic
...more
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Nominated to the 2004 Nordic Council’s Literature Prize & awarded the 2004 Norwegian Critics’ Prize.

Karl Ove Knausgård (b. 1968) made his literary debut in 1998 with the widely acclaimed novel Out of the World, which was a great critical and commercial success and won him, as the first debut novel ever, The Norwegian Critics' Prize. He then went on to write six autobiographical novels, titled My S
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Other books in the series

Lese, skrive (Forlaget Oktober) (3 books)
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“When I was a boy I read an enormous quantity of books, my sole object being to get away from the reality I was living in—in other words, pure and simple escapism.” 0 likes
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