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The Dangers of Christian Practice: On Wayward Gifts, Characteristic Damage, and Sin
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The Dangers of Christian Practice: On Wayward Gifts, Characteristic Damage, and Sin

4.04  ·  Rating details ·  28 ratings  ·  8 reviews
Challenging the central place that “practices” have recently held in Christian theology, Lauren Winner explores the damages these practices have inflicted over the centuries

Sometimes, beloved and treasured Christian practices go horrifyingly wrong, extending violence rather than promoting its healing. In this bracing book, Lauren Winner provocatively challenges the assump
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Hardcover, 240 pages
Published October 23rd 2018 by Yale University Press
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Rachel This is a scholarly book, so the tone, level of academic detail, and density of the argument will be significantly different from books like *Mudhouse…moreThis is a scholarly book, so the tone, level of academic detail, and density of the argument will be significantly different from books like *Mudhouse Sabbath* or *Girl Meets God.* It probably has more in common with her *A Cheerful and Comfortable Faith* (Yale UP, 2010) than her better-known books. It jumps right into the theological deep end, launching a technical discussion of the doctrine of sin in the very first paragraph. It's an important work of theology, but not something to read because you are seeking the joy of spending time with Winner's accessible prose styling as found in her more popular books. (less)

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Adam Shields
Oct 24, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Takeaway: Spiritual practices are not magic bullets.

Over the past few years I have become a disciple of spiritual practices. I have a spiritual director. I regularly use the Book of Common Prayer. I really do think that the eucharist and baptism should be central to worship. This makes me the target audience of Lauren Winner’s new book, the Dangers of Christian Practice.

The rough thesis is that spiritual practices, while good, have weaknesses that need to be paid attention to. Just like the chu
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Rachel
This is an important contribution to the discussion of Christian practices that deserves serious attention. Winner's careful historical work describing and analyzing the ways some beloved Christian practices (Eucharist, petitionary prayer, baptism) can be badly deformed is an important corrective to much theological and devotional work that treats Christian practices as unalloyed goods. The work draws richly on Winner's scholarly and pastoral sensitivities in fruitful ways.

As with the best of co
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David Bjorlin
Mar 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing
I'm still mulling over whether I completely agree with Winner's claims, but I believe this is an important and necessary challenge to those theologians, ethicists, and liturgists that have treated worship and Christian practices as goods that work ex opere operato to form people in the Christian virtues.
Amanda Patchin
Oct 28, 2018 rated it really liked it
I really appreciated Winner's corrective perspective. I would have appreciated more philosophical reflection and insight into changing our approach to the rhetoric of practices in the church. I think that Winner's challenge will be helpful to Christian educators thinking about the "characteristic damage" of even the best teaching practices - I know that I will be reflecting on this for some time.
Luke
Dec 05, 2018 rated it liked it
An engaging book on the historical damages and sinful dangers that are packaged with Christian practices. A good corrective to sacramental optimists like Hauerwas and co., but Winner risks ontologizing sin as a force that somehow has power OVER sacraments.
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Not what I expected, in both good and not so good ways
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Lauren F. Winner is the author of numerous books, including Girl Meets God and Mudhouse Sabbath. Her study A Cheerful & Comfortable Faith: Anglican Religious Practice in the Elite Households of Eighteenth-Century Virginia was published in the fall of 2010 by Yale University Press. She has appeared on PBS’s Religion & Ethics Newsweekly and has written for The New York Times Book Review, The ...more