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The Sun Also Rises

3.82  ·  Rating details ·  325,991 Ratings  ·  10,857 Reviews
The quintessential novel of the Lost Generation, The Sun Also Rises is one of Ernest Hemingway's masterpieces and a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway's most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley. The story f ...more
Paperback, 189 pages
Published 1957 by Pan Books (first published 1926)
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Glinting Eyes Alcohol rules the life of characters . It let them forget their moral decadence. Drinking alcohol is a survival strategy of every character. It numbs…moreAlcohol rules the life of characters . It let them forget their moral decadence. Drinking alcohol is a survival strategy of every character. It numbs the feeling of insecurity and anxiety. It let them forget their wounds and let them escape the guilt of not being a moralistic human being.(less)
Jennifer Hemingway is generally not appropriate for 12 year olds, no. Not just the subject matter, but also the writing style is not something I feel like a 12…moreHemingway is generally not appropriate for 12 year olds, no. Not just the subject matter, but also the writing style is not something I feel like a 12 year old would really enjoy. If you're dead set on something by Hemingway, I might suggest his novella The Old Man and the Sea.(less)
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Community Reviews

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Grace Tjan
What I learned from this book (in no particular order):

1. Jews are stubborn.

2. Being a Jew in Princeton sucks.

3. Being impotent sucks, especially if you are in love with a beautiful woman.

4. A beautiful woman is built with curves like the hull of a racing boat. Women make swell friends.

5. If you suffer from domestic abuse, the best way to work it out is by going through as many men as possible in the shortest time, and then discard them like wet tissues once you’re done --- if you happen to be
...more
Stephanie *Very Stable Genius*
I was sitting on the patio of a bar in Key West Florida. It was August, it was hot. The bar was on the beach where there was lots of sand and water. In the water I saw dolphins and waves. The dolphins jumped and the waves waved.

My glass was empty. The waiter walked up to my table. “More absinthe miss?” He asked. “No, I better not. *burp*” I put my hand over my glass “I read somewhere that it can cause hallucinations and nightmares. Just some ice water please.” I said. He put and empty glass in f
...more
Matt
Aug 22, 2008 rated it liked it
Shelves: classic-novels
Oh, to have been Ernest Hemingway. Except for the whole shotgun thing.

He was a man, back when that meant something. Whatever that means. He had it all: a haunted past; functional alcoholism; a way with words; a way with women; and one hell of a beard. I mean, this was the guy who could measure F. Scott Fitzgerald's penis without anyone batting an eye. He was just that cool.

I love Hemingway. You might have guessed that, but let's make it clear off the bat. For Whom the Bell Tolls is in my top f
...more
Tra-Kay
Aug 22, 2007 rated it it was ok
Shelves: fiction
If I were Hemingway's English teacher (or anyone's any kind of teacher) I'd say, "This reads more like a screenplay than a novel. Where are your descriptions, where is the emotion??"
And he would say something like, "The lack of complex descriptions helps focus on the complexities and emptiness of the characters' lives, and the emotion is there, it's only just beneath the surface, struggling to be free!"
And I'd say, "OK, I'll move ya from a C to C+."

Basically The Sun Also Rises shows that Hemingw
...more
Amanda
Jun 06, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: kick-ass, blog
This may be my favorite book of all time. At any rate, it's definitely on the top ten list and by far my favorite Hemingway (and I do love some Hemingway). The first time I read this, I loved Lady Brett Ashley. Is she a bitch? Sure, but I don't think she ever intentionally sets out to hurt anyone. And it might be argued that she has reason to be one: her first true love dies in the war from dysentery (not exactly the most noble of deaths) and she's physically threatened by Lord Ashley, forced to ...more
J.L.   Sutton
May 29, 2014 rated it it was amazing
My feelings haven't changed since my last re-read of The Sun Also Rises (my earlier review is below). I'm still amazed at how fully the characters come alive on the page! I don't think The Sun Also Rises is for everyone; however, nearly from beginning to end, I'm engaged in the story.

Just finished a re-read of The Sun Also Rises (my favorite Hemingway book-last read in 2014). I didn’t provide a review at the time so I thought I would (try to) explain why this book speaks to me. First, it is dec
...more
Brad
Mar 25, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I've read this book every year since 1991, and it is never the same book. Like so many things in this world, The Sun Also Rises improves with age and attention.

Some readings I find myself in love with Lady Brett Ashley. Then I am firmly in Jake Barnes' camp, feeling his pain and wondering how he stays sane with all that happens around him. Another time I can't help but feel that Robert Cohn is getting a shitty deal and find his behavior not only understandable but restrained. Or I am with Mike a
...more
colbyhewitt
Jun 12, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone
I think there is something cheesey about reviewing an old book, but I felt I had to write something, as I constructed my senior thesis in college with this book as the cornerstone, I have read it at least six times, and I consider The Sun Also Rises to be the Great American Novel. Why?
1) Hemingway was, if nothing else, a great American. A renaissance man, a soldier, a fisherman, and a sportswriter, a romantic and an argumentatively direct chauvinist, a conflicted religious agnostic who never aba
...more
Kemper
Jun 09, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 100, classic-lit
There’s a very nice restaurant that my wife and I frequent that has become our go-to spot for special occasions like birthdays or anniversaries. When we first started going here, I saw that they were serving absinthe. I’d been curious about the drink since first reading Hemingway’s descriptions of it in The Sun Also Rises back in high school.

Banned for most of the twentieth century in the U.S. for wildly exaggerated claims of it’s hallucinogenic qualities, it was made available to be imported h
...more
Alex
THIS BOOK IS ABOUT A MAN IN SPAIN HE GETS FRIENDZONED.
William2
Mar 24, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 20-ce, us, fiction
“Funny,” Brett said. “How one doesn’t mind the blood.”

4th reading. IMHO, this is one of the essential books of life. It never fails. It possesses—for the right reader—an enormity of narrative pleasure and it grips from the very first line. Some notes.

The passage at the Paris nightclub with the gay boys doesn’t bother me as it used to. Our narrator, Jake, knows he’s being unreasonable. The queers, with whom Brett arrives at the club, have working penises and choose not to use them on her. To a ma
...more
Meredith Holley
Jul 07, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: people on vacation
Everything is still tonight, like a friend was talking and I didn’t hear her until she stopped. Like absence. Coming back from vacation has that feeling of loss because all of the friendships resolve into something real, whatever that may be. Whenever I am away from home, I crave The Sun Also Rises. I think it got into my blood from reading it again and again at impressionable ages. Since I returned home this time, a couple of weeks ago, I can’t stop thinking about my friends in this book and th ...more
Stephen M
Feb 04, 2012 rated it it was ok
Recommends it for: Manly men.
Recommended to Stephen M by: The World at Large
Shelves: overrated
She Aches Just like a Woman

I’ll start off with something that I thought was interesting (hint: it borders on being annoying). For the first 75 pages, characters move in and out of this book with such swiftness and with no mention of physical description or notable characteristics, it mimics the effect of being at a really crowded party where you meet face after face, name after name and you have no time to process who is who, why they are significant and if you should even bother to remember the
...more
Matthias
May 30, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Matthias by: Lucian
Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises could be read like it's some kind of evil social experiment. You take a room and you put in three elephants. (You may also choose to build the room around the elephants for practical reasons.) You give the elephants names, and paint these names on their flanks in letters big, bright and red. You call them Impotence, Jealousy and Loneliness. Then you have a group of people enter that same room, a couple of guys and a gorgeous girl. They can do anything they like, they g ...more
Melki
This is essentially a 200+ page drinking game which features a group of people who don't need to work for a living getting tipsy and talkative. It's not awful, but compared to the other two Hemingway novels I've listened to - (The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms) - this one seems rather dull and pointless.

Indeed, the only real pleasure I got out of this audio version was the fact that it was read by William Hurt. He does a fantastic drunken Irishman, PLUS, it was a joy picturing him
...more
Lyn
Jul 30, 2011 rated it it was amazing
The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway’s brilliant 1926 novel about the Lost Generation is a must read for Twentieth Century literature.

I was assigned this as a junior in college, our English professor told us to read it and to be prepared to talk next week. The next class was spent on students describing their thoughts about the novel and what we thought it meant. With a smug smile and somewhat of a condescending air, the instructor stepped form his podium and said something to the effect that re
...more
Sarah
Dec 08, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2017-reads, fiction
“Don't you ever get the feeling that all your life is going by and you're not taking advantage of it? Do you realize you've lived nearly half the time you have to live already?"
"Yes, every once in a while."
"Do you know that in abou thirty- five more years we'll be dead?"
"What the hell, Robert," I said. "What the hell."
"I'm serious."
"It's one thig I don't worry about," I said.
"You ought to."
"I've had plenty to worry about one time or other. I'm through worrying."
"Well, I want to go to Sou
...more
Fabian
Jul 18, 2014 rated it really liked it
Yes, impeccable and precise prose. Yes, a superstar writer. Yes, I hadn't read it before, but that's totally okay.

Somehow, I couple this quaint piece--most of the characters are blah because they belong to that blah generation, I mean, what to do if not fight in war?--with the monstrously intolerable novel by Malcolm Lowry, "Under the Volcano." But thank god this one has the European charm that is all but ridiculed in Lowry's take on some similarly lost days in Mexico. Here are some lost days i
...more
Arah-Lynda
Jul 23, 2011 rated it did not like it
Shelves: i-said
While I was reading this I thought time and again about a quote from another book.

This one: Mrs. Poe

“That’s it!” I dropped the magazine.
“What Mamma?” asked Vinnie
“This silly alliteration – it’s clinkering, clattering claptrap.”
Ellen’s face was as straight as a judge’s on court day. “You mean it’s terrible, trifling trash?”
I nodded. “Jumbling, jarring junk.”
Vinnie jumped up, trailing shawls like a mummy trails bandages. “No it’s piggly, wiggly poop!”
“Don’t be rude, Vinnie,” I said.
The girls glanc
...more
Luke Narlee
Oct 21, 2016 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: favorites
There will always be a special place in my heart for this book. It's easily one of my favorite books of all time. Definitely my favorite Hemingway book (it's quite different from the rest). No, it's not perfect. Yes, it gets a bit boring in the middle when its main focus is on bull fighting. But for the most part, the story is funny and wonderful and quite touching. The dialogue is so alive, it practically has a pulse. Nobody writes dialogue like that anymore. It's snappy, fast, witty, honest... ...more
Duane
Oct 30, 2013 rated it really liked it
This is my favorite Hemingway novel, maybe because it was my first. The Sun Also Rises was to Hemingway what The Great Gatsby was to Fitzgerald.
Warwick
Apr 02, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I finished The Sun Also Rises in a hotel room in Vienna, and reading it while in transit in Europe perhaps affected how much I liked it – I liked it very much, far more than I expected to after my ambivalent reaction to A Farewell to Arms. The open, wide-ranging view of Europe from Paris to Pamplona is something I feel very in need of right now, and Hemingway's hungover cynicism masquerading as wisdom seems here much more beautiful to me. This is particularly so because instead of the grand trag ...more
Perry
Mar 30, 2012 rated it liked it
Shelves: libri-classici
"'The Sun Also Rises' is about bullfighting, bullslinging and bullshit."
Zelda Fitzgerald

[[3.4 stars]]

2d from left is British socialite Duff Twysden (on whom "Lady Brett Ashley" was based), and next to her is Hadley Richardson, Hemingway's 1st wife

On my mission over the past 8 years to read all "classics," this one strikes me the least.

The novel is apparently held in high esteem now for Hemingway's style than for the story's substance, which is a bit dated by its reliance on the people, places
...more
Jason Koivu
Nov 29, 2008 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
The bored, the disenchanted, the wandering wondering and/or nearly thoughtless (except for where their next drink will come from) ex-pat characters, these borderline socialites fighting off ennui, of Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises do very little worth reading about and yet read you do. Blame it on the author's clean writing style or his choice of scenes, choosing to paint with poignant words almost documentary style clips of cultural happenings that still excites even in this television/internet ...more
Thomas
Such a boring book. I get that Hemingway captures the decadence and dissolution of the Lost Generation. I get that his writing style brings to mind adjectives like "sparse" and "blunt" and "elegiac." But I do not get how to find enjoyment from such a repetitive book that glamorizes violence, excessive drinking, outdated forms of masculinity, homophobia, and antisemitism. One could argue that Hemingway reports these toxic ideas as ideals of the time, but even then, he does nothing special with hi ...more
Madeline
Dec 06, 2008 rated it it was ok
Shelves: the-list, ugh
Meh. I think I would have liked this book a lot more if something had actually happened. The plot doesn't really flow; it's just a bunch of events strung together that go like this: work a bit at a newspaper agency, waffle around Paris for ages, travel around France, argue, pine for some woman who I thought was a man for several pages because her name is "Brett", go to Spain, go trout fishing, take a nap, go to some bullfights, pine and complain some more, go back to Paris.
In between every sing
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway
The Sun Also Rises is a 1926 novel written by American author Ernest Hemingway about a group of American and British expatriates who travel from Paris to the Festival of San Fermín in Pamplona to watch the running of the bulls and the bullfights. An early and enduring modernist novel, it received mixed reviews upon publication.
تاریخ نخستین خوانش: بیستم ماه اکتبر سال 2012 میلادی
عنوان: خورشید همچنان میدمد؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: همایون مقدم؛ 1333، در 24
...more
Lena Webb
Jul 12, 2007 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I gave this one star because I wasn't old enough to drink or really enjoy much of anything when I first read it, and I haven't read it again since.

I'm almost certain I'd still hate it though.
Luís C.
A poignant novel that evokes (among others) a problem of the thorniest: male impotence and painful consequences, here, drowned in alcohol.
Drama in three acts, the sun also rises is its first branch in the night Paris Latin Quarter where cross Jacob Barnes says Jake (the narrator), American war wounded, unhappy hero constantly drunk, Lady Brett Ashley dubbed Brett "damn good", "made that curves"; Robert Cohn "in the money in their pockets", writer and ex-boxing champ and others who cheerfully toa
...more
Ana Tijanić
Mar 26, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I pored toga što mi je u nekim trenucima bila dosadna, knjiga mi se poprilično dopala.

Radnja romana prvih stotinak i više stranica izgleda otprilike ovako (dok ne pročitate nastavak pa shvatite o čemu je zapravo reč): Izadjemo iz hotela, odemo na zabavu, popijemo piće, odemo na večeru pa i tu popijemo još poneko. Vratimo se u hotel, popijemo piće. Onda odemo u Španiju, budemo u hotelu, večeramo i popijemo ... pa u krug.

Sa druge strane, razumljivo zbog čega je to tako.
Roman je o grupi ljudi koj
...more
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18,984 followers
Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story collec ...more

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“you can't get away from yourself by moving from one place to another.” 1385 likes
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