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Sexism Ed: Essays on Gender and Labor in Academia
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Sexism Ed: Essays on Gender and Labor in Academia

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4.31  ·  Rating details ·  26 ratings  ·  12 reviews
"Sexism Ed is smart, incisive, and hard to put down." —Jessica W. Luther, author of Unsportsmanlike Conduct: College Football and the Politics of Rape.

Why aren’t more women at the top of the ivory tower?

The academy claims to be a meritocracy, in which the best and brightest graduate
students gain employment as professors. Kelly J. Baker, a Ph.D. in Religion, assumed that m
...more
Paperback, 1, 200 pages
Published April 2nd 2018 by Raven Books
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Chanequa Walker-Barnes
Dec 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing
This book needs to be read by everyone considering a doctorate (especially in the humanities), so that they’ll have some inkling of what they’re up against in terms of the academic job market. It also needs to read by graduate students and scholars in all fields, but especially those who are under the illusion that academia is a democracy or a meritocracy. Most of all, it needs to be read by college/university administrators and trustees.
Jessica Luther
Feb 06, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Kelly Baker's Sexism Ed: Essays on Gender and Labor is a meticulously sourced and thorough look into the myriad ways that misogyny is built into the very bones of the academy, not some sad by-product of it. She smartly connects this to the ongoing issue of contingent labor in higher ed, an ever-pressing topic worth questioning.

Sexism Ed is smart, incisive, and hard to put down. Baker's writing style is inviting, her words are challenging, and, even if she wouldn't want me to say it, her argumen
...more
Paul
Feb 26, 2021 rated it liked it
Shelves: feminism, grad-school
This is a good, if harrowing, collection of essays about – as the subtitle would indicate – sexism and labor precarity in academia. Baker talks a little about her own experiences struggling to find a full-time, tenure-track job and the sexism that she experienced during that quest, and it's clear those experiences – followed by her experience as "contingent" faculty – form the foundation for these essays.

For those outside the academic world, "contingent" faculty are adjuncts and lecturers who wo
...more
Adri Joy
Apr 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I received Sexism Ed through the LibraryThing Advanced Reviewer Programme in exchange for Opinions.

This is a strong collection of essays with a varied set of themes, largely drawing on Baker’s personal experiences both as a fledgling academic trying and failing to get onto the tenure track. Baker later left academia to become a full-time writer, including becoming the editor of Women in Higher Education, and the material in this book was created over a series of years.

The material is divided int
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Laura
Feb 06, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This compact set of essays written between 2014 and 2018 are a window into sexual politics, the academy, and the structures of inequity that are this America moment. These are gendered tales, intimate stories about productive and reproductive labors and what it means to speak up and to speak out, and the costs of being heard. None of this is easy. “#MeToo” comes out of a long legacy of feminist activism, struggle and powerful writing. In this collection, Kelly Baker steps up and out. She present ...more
Dax Ovid
Jan 29, 2020 rated it really liked it
A combination of Higher Ed research and personal stories, tying in race, gender, family, even physical appearance in the biases of society—from which, academia is not shielded. While staying grounded in hope in the face of institutional barriers, Baker offers examples of the power of social media and community in bringing awareness to these issues and more—“adjunctification” of the university, hiring committee and faculty biases, the drop in tenure-track positions, academic freedom, public respo ...more
Elizabeth
Oct 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: 2018
Baker is one of the smartest and bravest writers about the academy today. I'll admit that this collection is sometimes hard to read due to just how depressing much of what she reveals is, but it also is infused with hope. In particular, Baker illuminates how the current perilous state of academia (the professoriate in particular) provides us with a perfect opportunity to change the systems that have led to oppression and unfair labor practices in the first place. Our history works against us, bu ...more
Christine Schmid
Mar 18, 2019 rated it it was amazing
The essays in this book felt like they could have been written by myself or any women I know either in higher ed or on the periphery of it like me. As upsetting as many of the topics covered are, it was a relief to see them discussed in print. That means my reactions, feelings, anger, frustration, shock, etc were perhaps not all in my head!
Richard Newton
Feb 13, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Sexism Ed is the real deal. If you've ever wondered how and why academia works the way it does, this is the insider that pulls you to the side and let's you know what's up. Though it's not a long book, it has a heft and depth that leaves you more ready for introspection. Baker balances visceral personal accounts with solid, driving research. The real feat of this book is that it never feels like a lecture. Though you're reading her words, you feel like your having a conversation and that she's l ...more
Katie
Jan 25, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: memoir, higher-ed
An important book that tells unvarnished truths about being a woman in academia. Everyone who works in higher ed needs to read this book.
Sarah Boon
Apr 05, 2018 rated it really liked it
My review for LARB is here: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/t... ...more
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Recommends it for: Women Working in Higher Education
I wrote this pre-publication editorial blurb for Kelly's book: "An absolute must-read. Sexism Ed tells savage truths that every administrator and tenured prof should be forced to read and acknowledge. Baker skewers the bogus "no sexism here" self-delusion of academic employers. Parsing the structural sexism of employment in higher ed, Baker comprehensively exposes the everyday abusers of women and contingent faculty. She pushes past headlines and obvious villains to the broadly complicit groups ...more
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Kelly is the author of Gospel According to the Klan: The KKK’s Appeal to Protestant America, 1915-1930, The Zombies Are Coming!: The Realities of the Zombie Apocalypse in American Culture, Grace Period: A Memoir in Pieces, and Sexism Ed: Essays on Gender and Labor in Academia.

She's also the editor of Women in Higher Education, a feminist print monthly, and a freelance writer with a religious studi
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