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Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot

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4.33  ·  Rating details ·  324 ratings  ·  62 reviews
A potent and electrifying critique of today's feminist movement announcing a fresh new voice in black feminism

Today's feminist movement has a glaring blind spot, and paradoxically, it is women. Mainstream feminists rarely talk about meeting basic needs as a feminist issue, argues Mikki Kendall, but food insecurity, access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living
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Hardcover, 288 pages
Published March 3rd 2020 by Viking (first published February 25th 2020)
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✨    jamieson   ✨
One of the biggest issues with mainstream feminist writing has been the way the idea of what constitutes a feminist issue is framed. We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to
...more
Alexa
Nov 19, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Thank you Penguin Group and Netgalley for the advance copy of this book, which will be released 2/25/20.

This book is important. Its not always pleasant. It calls you on your shit. But more people should read it. It serves as a reminder that feminist issues include things like food insecurity, access to quality education, a living wage, and medical care. The book discusses how gun violence, mental health, education, and poverty are all feminist issues and frames them as racial and socio-economic
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Ivonne Rovira
Mar 07, 2020 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Ivonne by: NetGalley
Mikki Henderson does a good job of pointing out how often feminism means more rights for upper-middle-class working women who need nannies, while forgotten African-American women, lesbians, transgendered women and working-class women of all races. Issues that are definitely feminist ones housing, living wages, food security and more are thought of as labor issues when we should instead operate from a mindset of intersectionality.

I enjoyed Hood Feminism, but I didnt find it as inspiring as
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Biblio Bushra
Feb 23, 2020 rated it it was amazing
When we think of feminism, what usually comes to mind is the suffragette movement, equal pay and abortion themes that have traditionally epitomised the struggle for women to fight for their rights. Hood Feminism shows us that the traditionally Eurocentric embodiment of feminism needs an overhaul to include rights for more than just elite, White women.

Mikki Kendall brings an entirely different and refreshing dynamic to intersectional feminism. In this series of essays, she sheds light on the
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BMR, LCSW
Oct 16, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I got an ADC from Edelweiss and the publisher, for review.

This book is a series of essays on feminism and its many intersections, from Chicago writer (and veteran, and wife, and mom, and academic, and Twitter pugilist) Mikki Kendall.

It covers poverty, intimate partner violence, education, reproductive justice, respectability politics, classism, sexual harassment and rape culture, and loads of other terribly important and relevant topics. She's often tagged as "mean" by critics, but she's really
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Liv
3.5 Stars

Privilege not only blinds you to oppression, it blinds you to your own ignorance even when you notice the oppression.


Hood Feminism by Mikki Kendall is an exploration of feminism focusing on the areas that are often overlooked: poverty, hunger, gun violence, murder, education to name a few. Hood Feminism focuses on the concept that mainstream feminism often overlooks the essential necessities in life that women need in order to live. She calls out how often we focus on feminism
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Sahitya
Apr 01, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have been very interested in reading this book since the first time I heard about it because I always want to learn more about intersectional feminism, and this turned out to be such an brilliant read that cant be forgotten easily.

Its nothing new that when we talk about mainstream feminism and see who are represented as feminist icons in the media, the image we are shown mostly is that of a cis white educated woman, and all the women of marginalized groups who are working tirelessly for their
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Madeline
Feb 14, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
For anyone who might consider themselves a feminist (which I would like to hope would be most people.. but alas), this is essential reading. Through chapters that each address a specific theme, Kendall lays out why issues that some may consider outside of the scope of feminism to be addressed by the movement and understood as feminist issues. Using her own experience and research, combined with her powerful, angry voice, Kendall makes it clear why these issues matter.

Kendall makes it clear why
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Charlott
Feb 29, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
4,5

This book is a good primer for everyone who asks themself how inclusive their feminism is. Kendall puts a focus on topics which are often disregarded, appropriated, or dismissed in mainstream (white) feminism. She writes about housing and food as feminist issues, allyship, how real reproductive justice could look like (and why it's important to take a clear stance against eugenics in pro-choice activism), the hypersexualisation of Black girls, gentrification, etc.

"There's an element of
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Molly Dettmann
Mar 27, 2020 rated it it was amazing
An excellent read. Kendall does a great job in each essay laying out the problems with feminism that isnt intersectional, weaving in strong points based on stats, facts, and personal anecdotes. From the lens I read this from, I hadnt dealt with these issues the way women of color and LGBTQ+ women have. It was humbling to read this perspective and really see where my own idea of feminism could be more intersectional and how I could be a better accomplice, not just an ally giving lip service. This ...more
Laura
Mar 04, 2020 rated it really liked it
This is a fantastic book that is both a critique of white feminism and also a deep dive into various feminist issues (housing, health care, food security, education, etc.) that mainstream/white feminism has done a pretty terrible job of addressing. It is absolutely scathing, in a way that feels exciting and full of momentum. Though very different, it reminded me in some ways of Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper--both books use anger in meaningful ways to not only illustrate and illuminate ...more
Michaela
Mar 09, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: dnf

---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ----

Dnf p. 140. Well, someone has to give the 1st unpopular 1-star review. *sigh.* I guess that'll be me, then.

Will have to come back & review when I can more clearly articulate what is so wrong with this. Obviously I don't recommend it. If you've a science background, or any familiarity with recent social history (esp. w/ a legal bent) the problems here will become obvious in the reading without your even having to look into

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Caitlyn
Mar 14, 2020 rated it it was amazing
The next essential feminist text to read if supporters want the movement to enact real change for women of color, lower income and women in poverty, LGBTQIA-identifying women, and women with disabilities. Mikki Kendall made strong points I had never even considered before, like how Cook County's soda tax only hurt the poor and working class instead of improving people's health. Truly an eye-opening and insightful book.
Samantha
Mar 17, 2020 rated it really liked it
Mikki Kendall has taken some of the big issues we confront today around class, race, sexuality, and gender and reminded us that not only are they feminist issues, it is also very important to look at them through an intersectional lens. It's great that we as a society talk about certain topics more openly now, like domestic violence, mental health, and making a living wage. What Kendall does is force us to see that too often, it's only white people we consider when discussing such things. The ...more
Debra Hines
Mar 10, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2020
I read Kendall's book to learn how to be a better person and more inclusive and active feminist. She makes a strong case that today's feminism (as it has always been historically) is mostly about white feminists and their issues- equal pay, not getting the promotion, finding good childcare and the guilt of working and the like. Less important for white feminists are issues that are important to black feminists, which have more to do with survival. Indeed, her many of her essays' titles name her ...more
Christine Chatelain
Mar 24, 2020 rated it really liked it
Slight Confession: I couldnt get past the first page reading the physical book so I opt to listen to audio (my first audio btw). Anyways this was a great listen I found myself answering back to the audio with phrases like Say that again girl, You aint lying, Preach Hun. Most of the topics she touched based on I found myself speaking on these same things before subjects. I was so excited to get my hands on a book where someone share my same views and have the need to share the unfiltered truth! ...more
Jacquelyn Fusco
Mar 23, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Important and succinct, this book lays out how things are, what we're doing, and what we SHOULD be doing. Everyone should read this and just do what she says. Starting with listening. Starting with prioritizing those who are most vulnerable.
Maya Sophia
Mar 18, 2020 rated it really liked it
I love a good intersectional feminist text. Id write more, but honestly the world is upside down right now and my brain hurts. This was well written, interesting, and the topic is incredibly important. ...more
Michelle
Mar 24, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Really good run-down of some things that need to change in the feminist movement if it wants to represent all women.
Jaquie Campos
Mar 23, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Great unapologetic read. Do the work
Laken Wilson
Mar 07, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Anyone who calls themselves a feminist needs to read this book. It is currently my favorite book of 2020.
Grant Wingo
Mar 13, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Anyone who identifies as a feminist needs to listen to what Mikki Kendall has to say.
Roxanne Parker
Mar 21, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Read it. Fellow marginalized women, read and find solace and affirmation. White women, read and broaden your definition of feminism. Men, just read it, period.

Jen
Mar 15, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An essential collection of essays about the importance of intersectionality, which calls out some uncomfortable home truths about how mainstream (aka white) feminism has neglected people of colour and racial and socio-economic issues such as food insecurity, access to quality education, a living wage, medical care, gun violence, mental health, and classism. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to be more inclusive and act to instigate real change.
Shakera
Feb 27, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I am not a feminist and I have never identified with the movement. I have always felt that the movement itself was biased, unbalanced, and most times oppressive (at the very least in ideology) to women of color and marginalized groups. However, I do support each persons right to liberate themselves from the constraints society places on them due to gender, race, socioeconomic status and/or beliefs. When asked about ideologies on feminism, I can explain what I want to say but a couple of quotes ...more
Jim Robles
Mar 09, 2020 rated it really liked it
For stars for an essential read for White feminists. See how you look to your sisters. "The fundamental problem with white feminism has always been that it refuses to admit that the primary goal is shifting power to white women, and no one else" (256).

For all my Progressive friends this is a reminder to read "White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism." See why Robin Diangelo (Forward by Michael Eric Dyson) thinks White Progressives do more harm, to Blacks, than any
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Erin
A difficult read. As a white cis woman, it prompted some uncomfortable self-reflection. I can imagine for other readers it might be a painful reminder of everyday truths.

Notes:
4: No woman has to be respectable to be valuable.
120: Discussing how black girls dont have eating disorders. Similar point made in Mean about Latinas.
142: I know now that the seeds of my family were from across the water, and my roots are here in America... I will never know the cultures that birthed them or their
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Matthew
Mar 22, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Catherine
Mar 24, 2020 rated it really liked it
I am not ashamed of where I came from; the hood taught me that feminism isnt just academic theory. It isnt a matter of saying the right words at the right time. Feminism is the work that you do, and the people you do it for who matter more than anything else.

We know in the abstract that poverty is a feminist issue. Indeed, we think of it as a feminist issue -for other countries- and that we are in a place where bootstraps and grit can be enough to get anyone who wants it bad enough out of
...more
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52 likes · 12 comments
“One of the biggest issues with mainstream feminist writing has been the way the idea of what constitutes a feminist issue is framed. We rarely talk about basic needs as a feminist issue. Food insecurity and access to quality education, safe neighborhoods, a living wage, and medical care are all feminist issues. Instead of a framework that focuses on helping women get basic needs met, all too often the focus is not on survival but on increasing privilege. For a movement that is meant to represent all women, it often centers on those who already have most of their needs met.” 3 likes
“No one can live up to the standards set by racist stereotypes like this that position Black women as so strong they don’t need help, protection, care, or concern. Such stereotypes leave little to no room for real Black women with real problems. In fact, even the most “positive” tropes about women of color are harmful precisely because they dehumanize us and erase the damage that can be done to us by those who might mean well, but whose actions show that they don’t actually respect us or our right to self-determine what happens on our behalf.” 2 likes
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