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Reclaiming the State: A Progressive Vision of Sovereignty for a Post-Neoliberal World
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Reclaiming the State: A Progressive Vision of Sovereignty for a Post-Neoliberal World

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  61 ratings  ·  6 reviews
The crisis of the neoliberal order has resuscitated a political idea widely believed to be consigned to the dustbin of history. Brexit, the election of Donald Trump, and the neo-nationalist, anti-globalisation and anti-establishment backlash engulfing the West all involve a yearning for a relic of the past: national sovereignty.

In response to these challenging times, econ
...more
Kindle Edition, 310 pages
Published September 20th 2017 by Pluto Press
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Ivan Tereshchenko Yes, but mostly of Monetarism, which descended from the Austrian School.

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Martin Henson
Jan 15, 2019 rated it really liked it
A book in two parts - one retrospective and analytic, and the other forward looking. For me, the first part contained two chapters of particular interest - one on the Labour government of the 60s and 70s and the other on France under Mitterrand in the 80s - and their neoliberal turn before the - more obvious - Thatcher/Reagan period. In the second part I particularly liked the analysis of the merits/demerits of UBI versus JG - surprising, perhaps, because JG doesn't at least superficially seem v ...more
Tommy
Sep 05, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: politics
"Neoliberalism" is best understood as a "consensual" endogenous political program resulting from a flawed understanding of what governments can and can't do, it's not rooted in any real exogenous constraints imposed on countries by "global market forces" as most on the left/right, for different reasons, want to portray it as. "Neoliberal" is really to broad of a term however to be using to get across the real substantive differences in conservative/liberal reasoning for justifying all those self ...more
Juston Fenton
Jun 19, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2020-reads
Fantastic
Jon
Sep 11, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This one is quite a piece of work. It is split into two parts, the first part runs through an economic history of the West from roughly the great depression until the present day. Mitchell and Fazi's approach to the history is by synthesizing multiple established points of view, and more importantly, where these points of view fall short. The history is of how the West went from a mistrust of so-called free markets after the Great Depression, for which in 1944 Karl Polanyi said in an widely quot ...more
Ietrio
Nov 02, 2019 rated it did not like it
Shelves: junk
For Mitchell, Democracy is a good thing, as long as his sect is in control.
Scott Ford
Feb 26, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: economics
Excellent. Provocative. Perspective for the 21st century.
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