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Vertel me het einde

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4.44  ·  Rating details ·  6,304 ratings  ·  995 reviews
In 2015 werkte Valeria Luiselli — woonachtig in New York — als tolk met honderden Latijns-Amerikaanse kinderen die zonder ouders de Amerikaanse grens waren overgestoken. Ze vroeg hun steeds dezelfde veertig, voorgeschreven vragen voor de aanvraag van hun verblijfsvergunning. In het boek wordt pijnlijk duidelijk waar de naïeve realiteit van overheidsinstanties schuurt met d ...more
Paperback, 132 pages
Published August 2017 by Das Mag (first published 2016)
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Steph Personally, I think it would be a perfect read for 8th graders. The language is clear and concise without being over-dramatic, obscene, or graphic in…morePersonally, I think it would be a perfect read for 8th graders. The language is clear and concise without being over-dramatic, obscene, or graphic in nature. It brings an entirely new understanding of what it means to be undocumented in america, and sheds light on the experiences of these children and families.(less)
Nils As a user, you can't, unless you create(d) the entry. 'Librarians' ought to be able to (a specific user role) but I'm not sure how to become one:…moreAs a user, you can't, unless you create(d) the entry. 'Librarians' ought to be able to (a specific user role) but I'm not sure how to become one: "Goodreads Librarians are volunteers who have applied for and received librarian status on Goodreads."

Check out the Librarians Group perhaps, for more info https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...(less)

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Adam Dalva
Jun 09, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Sharp, short essay that shines a light on how America treats undocumented children. Luiselli, who's an excellent writer (though emotion veers in and out of this piece in unusual cadence), has worked in the federal immigration system as a translator and cannily structures the essay around the 40 questions that she asked children when trying to pair them with a lawyer. The goal is less about making an argument and more about trying to re-shift the grounds of discussion by breaking down the dangers ...more
Thomas
Jun 29, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
An unsentimental yet compassionate book that centers the ongoing plight of Latin American child migrants in the United States. Valeria Luiselli uses her role as a translator for these children to explore the many misconceptions people have about them (e.g., they’re rapists or drug dealers) and reflect their truer lived experiences (e.g., they’re fleeing from immense hardship, poverty, pain and suffering). When these kids come into the United States, they still encounter such hardship and racism, ...more
Carrie
Mar 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2017-favorites
“It is perhaps not the American Dream they pursue, but rather the more modest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born."

I wish I could force every person who chants "build a wall" or asks "why can't they just come here legally" to read this book. The 40 questions from the title are those Luiselli asks of detained children as a volunteer interpreter in federal immigration courts, and she uses this structure to give a concise, impassioned plea for us to recognize these childre
...more
Rincey
Nov 22, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The children who cross the Mexico border and arrive at the U.S. border are not "immigrants," not "illegals," not merely "undocumented minors." Those children are refugees of a war, and, as such, they should all have the right to asylum. But not all of them have it.

Tell me how it ends, Mamma, my daughter asks me.

I don't know.

Tell me what happens next.

Sometimes I make up an ending, a happy one. But most of the time I just say: I don't know how it ends yet.


Watc
...more
jenni
i'm such a Valeria Luiselli fangirl. her prose is like honey on the tongue, it's sweet and syrupy and sticky, it's like a pantry good, some delicacy to always have in supply. it's a gift that as readers we are blessed to even have received. i'm serious. i'm a fangirl.

unlike her novels, but also very much like her novels, this piece is afforded a considerable amount of brutality in its reading simply based off subject matter. not only is it concerned with our truly systemic horror sho
...more
Paul Fulcher
Mar 30, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019
The children’s stories are always shuffled, stuttered, always shattered beyond the repair of a narrative order. The problem with trying to tell their story is that it has no beginning, no middle, and no end.

In 2014, Valeria Luiselli, started writing a novel about the children seeking asylum in the US, and their treatment, including inhumane detention and deportation, by the Obama-administration immigration system, in particular the priority juvenile docket that gave those summoned by court
...more
TheSkepticalReader
Review originally posted on A Skeptical Reader.

In Tell Me How It Ends, Valeria Luiselli takes us through the process of reviewing undocumented children stuck in a limbo of red tapes. The book gives us a glimpse of the treacherous journey these children make when crossing the southern borders of the United States. And no, they are not rapists or drug dealers. They are victims of violence and the world needs to start recognizing them as such.

It begins with a very structured form of storyt
...more
Eric Anderson
Mar 19, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This short and powerful nonfiction piece by Valeria Luiselli is such a poignantly constructed insight into the immigration crisis/debate in America now. Luiselli relates her experiences working as a volunteer interviewing thousands of children from Central America who have been smuggled into the United States and are seeking residency/citizenship. She asks them questions from an intake questionnaire created by immigration lawyers that will play a large part in determining if the children will be ...more
Julie Ehlers
In this brief book that takes place during the Obama administration, novelist Valeria Luiselli recounts her experience volunteering as a translator/interpreter for refugee children in NYC immigration court. Tell Me How It Ends is one of those books that doesn't need a long summary or analysis, or at least I don't feel the need to provide one. Unless you already know a lot about this topic, you should read this book. The information it imparts is information everyone should have.
Gumble's Yard
Mar 25, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019
Re-read after Lost Children Archive’s longlisting for the 2019 Booker Prize.

“Why did you come to the United States”. That’s the first question on the intake questionnaire for unaccompanied child migrants. The questionnaire is used in the federal immigration court in New York City where I started working as a volunteer interpreter in 2015. My task there is a simple one: I interview children, following the intake questionnaire, and then translate their stories from Spanish to English.


A short essay by t
...more
jeremy
Jan 28, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
with gifted prose and a compassionate, but penetrating gaze, luiselli personalizes the ongoing plight of latin american child migrants in the united states. her own immersion as a translator informs a trenchant first-hand account of the labyrinthine legal processes and inevitable bureaucratic indifference faced by undocumented youth. humane yet often horrifying, tell me how it ends offers a compelling, intimate look at a continuing crisis – and its ongoing cost in an age of increasing urgency.
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...more
Vipassana
Nov 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
And perhaps the only way to grant any justice—were that even possible—is by hearing and recording those stories over and over again so that they come back, always, to haunt and shame us. Because being aware of what is happening in our era and choosing to do nothing about it has become unacceptable. Because we cannot allow ourselves to go on normalizing horror and violence. Because we can all be held accountable if something happens under our noses and we don’t dare even look.


The asylum seekers from
...more
Isabel
Mar 29, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2017
“Because-how do you explain that it is never inspiration that drives you to tell a story, but rather a combination of anger and clarity? How do you say: No, we do not find inspiration here, but we find a country that is as beautiful as it is broken, and we are somehow now part of it, so we are also broken with it, and feel ashamed, confused, and sometimes hopeless, and are trying to figure out how to do something about all that.”
Kayle Barnes
Important information, didn't care for the execution or organization, but still worth reading for an illuminating, if heartbreaking primer on our broken immigration system as it relates to the least of these.
Ellie
A very strong, moving book about the refugee crisis here in the United States. Luiselli makes it clear that it is not an "immigration" crisis but a refugee one, children fleeing from horrific conditions that the U.S. played a part in creating.

The book is built around a questionnaire that she did with the children in New York City volunteering as a translator. The picture that arises is that of traumatized children, lost, torn between two worlds. I had no idea of the extent of the dan
...more
Kathleen
Mar 27, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
My review for the Chicago Tribune: http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifesty...

So much of the appeal of truly brilliant creative writing can be explained by the saying, "It's not what you say, but how you say it," and the way that Valeria Luiselli says what she has to say in her latest publication, the book-length essay, "Tell Me How It Ends," is simultaneously dazzling and apt.

Subtitled "An Essay in Forty Questions," the book looks at an all too familiar and troubling topic in an utterly fresh yet appropriate fashion
...more
RuthAnn
Jul 29, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
READ THIS BOOK IMMEDIATELY

This account has reframed the immigration crisis so succinctly and searingly that it is impossible to ignore. I feel stunned, like when I read The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. I appreciate this book as a short (100 pages) reflection from a "regular" citizen whose volunteerism ignited activisim. Valeria is all of us, and any of us can be Valeria. I don't know what to do yet, but now I see starkly that something needs to be done. We all have
...more
Ylenia
Jun 03, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
4.5

I feel like this essay goes hand in hand with her most recent novel, Lost Children Archive. I read this only after her novel & I was surprised by how much of her life story she put into the novel.
I already said multiple times that Luiselli has an incredible talent with words & it's no surprise she managed to convey her point in this short essay in such a brilliant way. Tell Me How It Ends it's an extremely timely book.
Emily
Apr 03, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Best book I've read this year.
Should be required reading EVERYWHERE!
Stacia
Apr 08, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Required reading for those in the Americas, imo. It actually deals more with the time/policies under Obama, but also gets into our current administration a bit too. An issue that becomes more critical by the day.

Her book made me think, made me cry, & even made me have a tiny, tiny bit of hope. I have always said I have faith in the younger generation to step up & do the right thing, to solve too many problems they are inheriting, & this book gives just one small example.

...more
Jana
May 20, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommended to Jana by: Emily
I pass along this message: Everyone should read this book.

These are things going on right now in the US regarding the treatment of undocumented children. It breaks my heart. I don't know what to do, but one thing we must NOT do is look away.

Her more in depth explanation of the root of this problem towards the end of the (very short) book was eye opening for me.

p.30
Perhaps the only way to grant any justice - were that even possible - is by hearing and recording those stories o
...more
Vivek Tejuja
Apr 30, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Some books leave an impact that lasts forever. Tell Me How It Ends is one such book. A book about migrant children – children who have crossed into the border of United States of America illegally from these three countries – Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. And why so many children migrated to the US of A between 2014 and perhaps continue to till today? Well, the reasons were simple – to escape gang violence of their countries, to escape poverty, and to flee abuse from their own families o ...more
Philip
May 23, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, owned
On Page 96 of this work, as it begins to wrap itself toward no end, Luiselli writes: "There are things that can only be understood retrospectively, when many years have passed and the story has ended. In the meantime, while the story continues, the only thing to do is tell it over and over again as it develops, bifurcates, knots around itself. And it must be told, because before anything can be understood, it has to be narrated many times, in may different words and from many different angles, b ...more
Marta Franco
May 03, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
"It is not even the American Dream that they pursue, but rather the more modest aspiration to wake up from the nightmare into which they were born."

This personal book is a wonderful way to learn more about the Central American children refugee crisis and, more generally, immigration in the US. The author shares her own experience as a high skilled Mexican immigrant while navigating the frustration of trying to help the kids escaping violence in their home countries and seeking asylum
...more
Jan
May 16, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
In barely 100 pages, Luiselli provides an overview of the complex issues raised by the influx of child refugees crossing the US southern border, based on her first-hand experiences as a volunteer translator. So much heartache, so many catch-22s, and yet she finds a glimmer of hope at the end.
Khush
Feb 03, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
In over just 100 pages, this books tells us the story of undocumented children in the United States. Since the author has first-hand experience of what these children go through, she uses almost all of herself to bring the miseries of 'illegal children' to the fore. It is her own background, her own struggles with the Immigration that make her see the brutality of laws. Laws that can make children 'aliens', 'illegals', 'criminals' for being helpless, for being children.

It is also an
...more
dianne
Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City raised in South Africa. Unusual.

Her writing is like a massage, it’s so gently, elegantly, soft and smooth; when you realize you have learned something about your country, your world that is so unconscionable, that must be stopped, that you, yes you must do something about it. If these heartbreaking truths, these cuentos - that continue, possibly worsening under Trump’s racist policies, don’t make your heart hurt, check to see if you have a pulse
...more
WndyJW
Apr 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Every American should read these important essays about the suffering of children who come to the US as refugees from the drug related violence in Central America and the nearly impossible obstacles to their ability to find safety here, the richest country in the world. The problems didn’t start with Donald Trump so this is not an anti-Trump, anti-Republican screed. There is plenty of blame for everyone.
Kate ☀️ Olson
Blistering concise commentary ~ this essay is crucial read for those looking to better understand the plight of undocumented children entering the US from Central America and Mexico. The author's own immigrant status lends a unique slant to the book often missing from others dealing with this topic.
Viv JM
This essay was written as a result of the author working as a volunteer interpreter interviewing children who had crossed the southern border into the US. It is structured around the questionnaire these children are given to determine whether they get to stay in the country. A powerful essay, full of empathy as well as anger.
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Verbeelding Bookclub: December boek 14 62 Dec 30, 2017 12:21PM  

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1,070 followers
Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City in 1983 and grew up in South Africa. Her novels and essays have been translated into many languages and her work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney’s. Some of her recent projects include a ballet libretto for the choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, performed by the New York City Ballet in Lincoln Center in 2010; ...more
“Because—how do you explain that it is never inspiration that drives you to tell a story, but rather a combination of anger and clarity? How do you say: No, we do not find inspiration here, but we find a country that is as beautiful as it is broken, and we are somehow now part of it, so we are also broken with it, and feel ashamed, confused, and sometimes hopeless, and are trying to figure out how to do something about all that.” 13 likes
“And perhaps the only way to grant any justice—were that even possible—is by hearing and recording those stories over and over again so that they come back, always, to haunt and shame us. Because being aware of what is happening in our era and choosing to do nothing about it has become unacceptable. Because we cannot allow ourselves to go on normalizing horror and violence. Because we can all be held accountable if something happens under our noses and we don’t dare even look.” 12 likes
More quotes…