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Seeing Red

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3.86  ·  Rating details ·  681 ratings  ·  123 reviews

'A scorching examination of how being utterly dependent on someone - even someone you love - can make you a monster' Literary Hub, 13 Translated Books by Women You Need to Read

Lucina, a young Chilean writer, has moved to New York to pursue an academic career. While at a party one night, something that her doctors had long warned might happen finally occurs: her eyes haem

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Kindle Edition, 161 pages
Published August 3rd 2017 by Atlantic Books (first published January 1st 2012)
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3.86  · 
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 ·  681 ratings  ·  123 reviews


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Book Riot Community
This book is harrowing and intense and wonderful. It tells the story of a young woman facing blindness: she has known for a while that she could lose her sight, and then one night at a party it happens. Her boyfriend doesn’t get it and thinks she’s drunk as she stumbles around. But her eyes have filled with blood and while she hopes an operation might help, she knows it may not. The novel is written in the first person and we spend the entire book experiencing all her thoughts and emotions with ...more
julieta
Mar 05, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: ajualatinos
Primer libro que leo de Lina Meruane y estoy fascinada. Escribe con una fuerza que te atrapa desde la primera página. No se diga la historia, personal y durísima, pero hay algo en su uso del lenguaje que me conquistó. Tiene una urgencia que te empuja a seguir leyendo esta historia, que no sabes si pasó tal cual o no, pero como las grandes historias, tampoco es que importa, porque es una maravilla. Vivida entre Nueva York y Santiago, tiene amor, el vivido por ella, familia, hermanos, y en definit ...more
Vishy
Oct 20, 2017 rated it it was amazing
I discovered Lina Meruane's 'Seeing Red' when I stopped by at the bookshop a few days back. The cover grabbed my attention and refused to let me go. Then I read a quote by Roberto Bolaño on the back cover raving about Lina Meruane - well, who can resist that. I started reading it a couple of days back and finished reading it yesterday.

'Seeing Red' tells the story of a woman, who has a delicate health condition. Her eyes are in a delicate condition - her blood vessels in her eyes can burst any t
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Lark Benobi
As I was reading Seeing Red I had a sudden vivid wish to gather some women writers together who i realize have similar energy and similar honesty in their writing as Lina Meruane has in her writing, and whose writing is, like hers, brutally physical--by which I mean, not violent, but even so, deeply felt in the body. There is no distance at all in their writing. They write about blood and love and life and death.

Seeing Red begins, literally, with blood and love, in medias res, at a party, where
...more
Marjorie
Feb 09, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: edelweiss
This book is described as a new-to-me genre – autobiographical novel. Apparently the author, Lina Meruane, had a stroke and suffered temporary blindness, necessitating surgery. Her novel’s main character, also named Lina Meruane, is based on the author, also being an author having serious problems with her vision. The literary character literally sees red from the burst blood vessels behind her eye.

The book is written in short chapters with a stream of consciousness aspect to them. Having been t
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Guillermo Jiménez
Con diferencias mínimas de lo que se entendía en la Grecia antigua como tragedia, esta brutal novela de Lina Meruane podría ser leída como tal: sin coro, y con un reparto mínimo de actores, la narradora nos hunde en el sufrimiento de la vida de una escritora, una investigadora, que pierde la vista, al menos temporalmente.

Aunque antes de movernos a la compasión, siento que se acerca más más al espanto, al horror; y al mismo tiempo a una belleza ciega, una belleza del sonido, de los aromas, de las
...more
Cari
Feb 13, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book was so good I sent Meruane a giddy fan letter. It began as a sedate, polite note about how much I enjoyed the novel and spun out from there because... Wow. It was fantastic. I devoured it. I read it in the original Spanish, but I understand that Meruane worked closely with her translator for the English edition, Seeing Red, so it's bound to be excellent as well. Definitely seek it out. Definitely read it.
Alessandra JJ
Jul 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Acho que nunca na vida um livro me deu TANTA agonia quanto esse. Interrompi a leitura várias vezes porque não aguentava continuar. QUE GASTURA (mas foi ótimo, escrita da autora é impecável)
Johanna
Nov 05, 2017 rated it it was ok
Albeit a fascinating read I did struggle at times with the style, not sure if some of this is down to translation, but it did feel like a constant stream of consciousness which I found quite heavy at times.

Despite that, it’s such an unusual story, semi autobiographical as I believe the author experienced blindness following a stroke, so it’s a pretty horrific journey through the terrors of blindness, peppered with dark humour.
Shawn Mooney
I expected this autobiographical novel about a Chilean American woman going blind to be riveting; sadly, whether it was the translation or what, by the 50% mark I found it to be quite putdownable so that's what I did.
Juan
Dec 26, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Literatura del cuerpo. Escrita como un torrente. Excelente novela.
jeremy
Nov 16, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction, translation
an unsettling and disquieting look at a woman's descent into blindness, lina meruane's seeing red (sangre en el ojo) melds autobiography with fiction. meruane, a new york-based chilean novelist and lit professor, was awarded the 2013 sor juana inés de la cruz prize (given to spanish-language women writers) for this work. with a first-person narrative chronicling her own ocular decline, seeing red bears witness to the inter- and intrapersonal struggles that force the narrator to make sense of the ...more
Julie lit pour les autres
Lu en anglais : Seeing Red

Difficile pour moi de ne pas saupoudrer ce texte d'une pluie d'étoiles. Le viscéral parle.

Quel texte fascinant! Dans ce roman autobiographique, on suit Lina Meruane et les retombées terribles d'un simple mouvement vers l'avant. L'auteure souffre d'une maladie qui fragilise les veines intraoculaires, et lors d'une fête, alors qu'elle se penche pour saisir sa seringue d'insuline, les veines se rompent et le sang envahit ses yeux.

C'est le long parcours vers l'opération qu
...more
Grace PB
Aug 07, 2017 rated it liked it
This book was nothing like any other book I have ever read. The book is written with such a sense of urgency and passion which helps the reader sympathise with the protagonist in their situation of losing her sight.

It was an interesting read and I found it quite a 'heavy' read and it took a lot of concentration to get myself back into the book each time I picked it up.

I also assume that because it was translated from Spanish this made it more difficult to become engrossed in as it had some gramm
...more
Stephanie Jane (Literary Flits)
See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits

Seeing Red is an intriguing blend of fact and fiction where it is impossible to know how much of the narrative actually happened to Lina Meruane, the author, and how much has been imagined for Lina Meruane, the fictional character. Reading the novel in the first person adds to this sense of the two being indistinguishable and, for me, this worked brilliantly well although, having since read other reviews, I understand that not all readers wer
...more
Blodeuedd Finland
This book is autobiographical, but at the same time she does use fictional events. The author herself had a stroke and then she wrote this book. In first person, and with a character with the same name, except that person goes blind when her eyes start to bleed. But the author herself experienced blindness too and led that lead the way.

But this does seem to be the sort of book that is better read for example in a book club so that you can discuss it with others. Because it is just so personal. W
...more
Bookread2day
Hardback version from Atlantic Books My review is on www.ireadnovels.wordpress.com
At a party it was happening. Right then. The doctors had been warning Lucina, for a long time. At Twelve o’clock sharp she gave her an injection, when her purse fell to floor Lucina bent down to pick it up. And then a firecracker went off in her head. But no, it was no fire that she was seeing, it was blood spilling out inside her eye. Until twelve o’clock that night Lucina had perfect vision. But by three o’clock
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Amy Jane Smith
Sep 19, 2017 rated it really liked it
4.5 rounded up. Will review soon.
Kaguya
Feb 28, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
«Vivo adivinando, me está matando tanto acertijo».

Para mí sólo ha sido la novela que trata sobre una chica con las venas de los ojos rotas.

Sin embargo sabe engancharte, ya que estás toda la novela con la intriga de sí volverá a ver o no pero ya está, creo que no es una novela tan profunda como parece.
Melissa
I received a review copy of this title from the publisher through Edelweiss.

Our senses are our most precious natural gifts because it is through them that we are able to experience the world. At one point we have all probably wondered what it would be like to lose our hearing or our sight or our sense of smell. In Seeing Red, we are given a vivid understanding, through the character of Lina, of what it is like to lose one’s sight. Lina, a young woman attending graduate school in Manhattan and li
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Karen Mace
Aug 17, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: readersfirst
Initially drawn to this book because of the very striking cover, and the insides are just as striking! It wasn't written in the normal way and I think that really worked well with the subject matter as the author describes her conflicting emotions as her world changes when her eyesight begins to disappear.

I found her story to be shocking, brutal, raw, honest and she pulls no punches in describing the despair she begins to feel, the way she takes things out on the wrong people and had to start de
...more
Nora Eugénie
Se trata de una novela muy sensorial. A través de los ojos físicos de Lina vemos la sangre, sangre que tiñe y enturbia sus rutinas, como una cortina de terciopelo rojo. A través de los ojos mentales de Lina, que a menudo toma prestados de Ignacio, de su madre o de su doctor, vemos todo lo demás. Vemos el dolor, la angustia de perder la vista, de sentirse sumida en una tiniebla, la desesperanza, acontecemos a los comentarios hirientes de quienes creemos nos quieren y aceptan, a la hipocresía y ma ...more
Arelis Uribe
Jan 06, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Es la historia de una ciega que lo ve todo. En este libro, Meruane tiene una prosa súper visual, va narrando todo lo que percibe alrededor, usando el gusto, el oído y el olfato, y al contármelo, me lo imagino todo visualmente. Es un libro bellísimo, oscuro y melancólico, con una prosa llena de frases que una podría ponerse como estado de Facebook y sonar inteligente y sensible.
Helen McClory
A strange one, leading the reader on with winding sentences into despair or rambling, panicked thought - utterly queasy-making at the opening, but less so later. This is one of those books that I'll have to sit with to mull.

Which is a good thing, I think.
Juliana Muñoz
Algunas de mis frases favoritas:

“¿me quieres decir cuándo fui yo una niña?”
“nunca te dejaré ver lo que hay aquí adentro, cosas que ni siquiera me cuento a mí misma”
“los ojos eran depósitos de memoria”
“abrí la ventana como quien abre un párpado”
“un clamor de pájaros electrocutados en los cables de la luz"
(los vecinos) “todos esos gringos acostumbrados a madrugar con los calcetines puestos y los cordones ya anudados”
“Decía Central Park y la cabeza se me llenaba de patos azules”
“la palabra amanecer
...more
Suellen Rubira
Aug 31, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Antes de ler Sangue no olho, li uma entrevista com Lina Meruane e uma resenha sobre a obra, ambas no Jornal Rascunho de maio de 2015 (se a memória não trai o mês referido). Confesso que a resenha me empolgou bem mais que o livro em si. Mas aí, creio que há uma estratégia narrativa que torna tudo muito seco e direto, até porque Lina está ficando cega e muitas coisas precisam ser reelaboradas em sua mente. O fato de ser autoficção não me incomodou, não sei se é porque eu não conhecia a autora ou p ...more
Ramona
Apr 14, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Een boek wat ik las met een mengeling van afkeer en fascinatie. Het verhaal trok me niet echt aan, ik vond het geregeld erg saai en wilde het wegleggen. Maar de eerlijkheid, het confronterende, het willen weten of het goed zou komen met Lina en haar ogen zorgden ervoor dat ik bleef doorlezen. Het meekijken en ervaren wat zij heeft meegemaakt is moeilijk, rauw, maar aan de andere kant juist weer erg mooi.
enricocioni
A great, great book. Each chapter is a single unbroken paragraph a few pages long, and rich in vividly sensorial descriptions. I highly recommend this interview with the author on the Between the Covers podcast: http://www.davidnaimon.com/2016/06/30.... The circumstances in which I read this were less than ideal--squished in a car with my family, amazing scenery out the window providing a constant distraction--so I'm definitely re-reading this in the near future.
Emily
Jan 28, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: reading-women-18
" ... and suddenly I understand that this lunch is a goodbye. ... We all get up at the same time and Genaro wraps me in his arms, kisses both my cheeks and my forehead, promises to call me next week, to come visit me, but I know he won't that our friendship has ended in that picturesque restaurant of scavenging seagulls."
elidesc
Sep 01, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Ik moet eerlijk toegeven dat ik de laatste maanden mijn leeslust wat verloren was… Sinds begin 2018 las ik slechts drie boeken: één pageturner van Nicci French, één dagboek van een chefkok – meer bepaald Kobe Desramaults – en één non-fictie boek in het kader van mijn job. De reden ligt voornamelijk in mijn aangepaste tijdsverdeling nu Georges in mijn leven is gekomen. Vroeger las ik vaak ‘s ochtends in bad, daar vind ik tegenwoordig helaas de tijd niet meer voor. Ook ging Georges tot voor kort v ...more
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Lina Meruane (Santiago de Chile, 1970) es escritora y ensayista. Ha publicado el libro de cuentos Las infantas (1998) y las novelas Póstuma (2000), Cercada (2000), Fruta podrida (2007), premiada Mejor Novela Inédita por el CNCE, y Sangre en el ojo (2012), por el que recibió el premio Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. También ha publicado ensayos como Viajes virales (2012), Volverse Palestina (2013) y Con ...more
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“Towers are monuments in decline, you only have to build them and someone comes and knocks them down.” 0 likes
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