Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “London Rules (Slough House, #5)” as Want to Read:
London Rules (Slough House, #5)
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

London Rules

(Slough House #5)

4.29  ·  Rating details ·  4,062 ratings  ·  452 reviews

London Rules might not be written down, but everyone knows rule one.

Cover your arse.

Regent's Park's First Desk, Claude Whelan, is learning this the hard way. Tasked with protecting a beleaguered prime minister, he's facing attack from all directions himself: from the showboating MP who orchestrated the Brexit vote, and now has his sights set on Number Ten; from the showboa

...more
Kindle Edition, 352 pages
Published June 5th 2018 by John Murray (first published February 1st 2018)
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about London Rules, please sign up.
Popular Answered Questions
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.29  · 
Rating details
 ·  4,062 ratings  ·  452 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of London Rules (Slough House, #5)
Paromjit
Just superb and sublime! So good that I wished I had more stars to give this ever improving series featuring the Slough House failures from the intelligence services, presided over by the grotesque, corpulent, repulsive and flatulent Jackson Lamb, a man who refers to himself as a pagan deity. This is outstanding espionage fiction, that sharply satirises the car crash that is contemporary British politics with Brexit, and the security services. The unwritten London rules are followed religiously ...more
PattyMacDotComma
4★
“Eight months of anger f**king management sessions, and this evening she’d officially be declared anger free. It had been hinted she might even get a badge. That could be a problem – if anyone stuck a badge on her, they’d be carrying their teeth home in a hankie. . .”


More of Herron’s trademark humour, off-beat characters, and action in and around London. Plus his wonderful mood setting where the weather and the time of day become their own characters. I love this part of his style.

This fifth b
...more
Phrynne
Apr 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Brilliant. Just brilliant. I sincerely hope that Mick Herron is going to continue with this series because it gets better with each book. He kills his characters off and then replaces them with better ones! Who does that in a series?

Mind you he keeps his best characters going, River, Lamb, Catherine, Louisa are in every book. And they are so entertaining. The dialogue is witty and full of black humour. When political correctness was handed out Lamb was obviously behind a door somewhere and misse
...more
Carolyn
Jul 01, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Another brilliant addition to Mick Herron's brilliant espionage series based on a group of misfit spies (the 'Slow Horses') exiled to Slough House, where the dregs of the British secret service are sent to serve out their days with mind-numbingly dull tasks. Ruling over them all is Jackson Lamb, an odious man who drinks and smokes too much and whose sense of personal hygiene and lack of sensitive dialog makes him reviled by all. But he is not incompetent at his craft and is wily enough to know w ...more
Sandy
In the murky world of the British secret service, there’s a tacit understanding that everyone plays by London Rules. These aren’t the ones neatly compiled in official binders. No, these are the unwritten rules, the real ones. #1: Cover your arse.

And when it comes to MI5, it doesn’t matter whether you work at Regent’s Park or Slough House. The former is where all the cool kids get to be spies. The latter is home to agents who’ve screwed up royally but can’t legally (or at least, quietly) be kille
...more
Susan
Jan 29, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Without doubt, Mick Herron has created the best, modern spy series, in his Slough House books and this, latest instalment, is a wonderful addition. It begins with what seems to be a terrorist outrage, with us readers falling into line and imagining we know who is behind it. However, this is Mick Herron, these are the Slow Horses, and plotx do not go in straight lines here – they meander, double back, peer around corners and call your bluff.

So, things are not what they seem and our current batch
...more
Brenda
Jun 01, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love this series! Mick Herron has created these unique characters that feel like old friends now. If you decide to try this series, do yourself a favor and start with the first book, Slow Horses.

The book starts out with a terrorist act, claimed by ISIS, but it’s not in some small village in the Middle East. There are two more events, one involving penguins and the other a train. There is an attempt on Roddy Ho's life, and Shirley regretfully saves him. It happens a second time, again unsuccess
...more
Gary
Feb 02, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is the 5th book in the 'Slough House' series by author Mick Herron. Slough House is a dumping ground for British intelligence agents who have messed up a case. The "slow horses," are given menial tasks rather than be trusted on bigger cases.
I found the 1st book I read in this series OK but although loving the idea of Slough House and the relegated spies was not fully committed to reading further books. In spite of my doubts I decided to carry on regardless and I am so pleased I did. For me
...more
William
Apr 17, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A very good spy story, after a bit of a slow, wordy start. When Herron is on top of his game, the book is exciting and gripping, unputdownable. However, in several cases, Herron allows the dialogue to become repetitive and quite dull. I found myself skimming in several places. I think some of this is on-purpose to build tension, but that doesn’t really work.



One thing I’ve noted is the humour and general pacing improve substantially around the half-way mark. The plot is a bit outrageous and unlik
...more
Susan
May 11, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Without doubt, Mick Herron has created the best, modern spy series, in his Slough House books and this, latest instalment, is a wonderful addition. It begins with what seems to be a terrorist outrage, with us readers falling into line and imagining we know who is behind it. However, this is Mick Herron, these are the Slow Horses, and plots do not go in straight lines here – they meander, double back, peer around corners and call your bluff.

So, things are not what they seem and our current batch
...more
Andrea
Aug 24, 2019 rated it really liked it
4.5★

This series is truly rock solid - so reliably thrilling and darkly funny, and all-round-entertaining. London Rules, which is #5 in the series, is one of my favourites so far.

Beginning with a massacre that reads like the Balkans circa 1990s, you just have to remind yourself that this is MI5 - not 6 - and you know that something incredible has just happened. But that's not all. A string of seemingly random terror incidents, some more successful than others, PLUS an attempted hit on one of the
...more
Marty Fried
Dec 02, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mystery, audiobooks
After the first one or two, I fell in love with this series, and the love affair continues. This one is more of the same, with an added bonus for fans; we learn how Jackson Lamb ended up in Slough House.

Lamb is, of course, the fearless leader of the Slow Horses that everyone loves to hate. He seems like such a loser, but somehow he's always ahead of everyone else. And his behavior is so odious that it's hard to believe anyone would put up with it, but they do. One typical exchange happens when o
...more
Wanda
4.5 stars

I think Mick Herron’s Slough House series just keeps improving! Herron brings his characteristic humour to the creation of the failed spies of Slough House, with characters who all exhibit personal problems that interfere daily with their ability to function.

Eight months of anger fucking management sessions, and this evening she'd officially be declared anger free. It had been hinted she might even get a badge. That could be a problem--if anyone stuck a badge on her, they'd be carrying
...more
K.J. Charles
Another fantastic installment in this series, which is basically John le Carre for Brexit Britain. Everyone is fucked up, washed up, giving up, nobody can be trusted, and 'omnishambles' barely covers it.

The great thing about this series is, it manages to turn the bleakness up to 11 and have a totally ruthless ability to kill off characters or put them in the worst possible position, but it's also extremely funny. Jackson is a Falstaffian grotesque, his crew's mordant sense of humour and mutual
...more
debra
May 30, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This was almost exhaustingly funny, but I really really enjoyed it. I'm sure I wrote a review of this last year, buuuut it must have been during that period where I forgot that hitting "Save" was integral to actually saving a review.
Marianne
Mar 17, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
London Rules is the fifth book in the Slough House series by prize-winning British author, Mick Herron. During a sweltering summer in Slough House, the slow horses perform, with a minimum of enthusiasm, the tasks their boss, Jackson Lamb has dreamed up: Louisa Guy scans library records for borrowers of possible terrorist texts; River Cartwright pretends to compare rate payments with the electoral roll to reveal possible terrorist safe houses, while he worries about his demented grandfather; and ...more
Alex Cantone
London Rules is the fifth in the series featuring Slough House - the offshoot of MI5’s Regent Park, where disgraced spooks while away their days in administrative obscurity, headed by former cold war joe, Jackson Lamb - and the best yet. The team are in lock-down, following seemingly random terrorist attacks on British soil, and two foiled attempts to kill Roderick Ho, Slough House’s cyber-idiot in residence. J K Coe establishes a link, which suggests the acts follow a blueprint for destabilisin ...more
Gram
Feb 07, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
These days, one of the highlights of my life is getting to read the latest in Mick Herron's "Slow Horses" series. This is Number 5 and it's the best yet. At times, Herron's writing is almost poetic and then he fires in a smart-ass one liner that just nails it. He can veer from a beautiful description of dawn breaking over London to incisive analysis of Britain's current political woes and the evils of terrorism.

I lost count of the laugh-out-loud moments in "London Rules" and there's a line about
...more
Nigeyb
Jan 17, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Wonderful. The Slough House series of novels just gets better and better. London Rules is the fifth in the series.

When a friend suggested that Mick Herron was up there with John Le Carré, I was dubious. John Le Carré is an all time great, a titan, however she is quite correct. Not only does Mick Herron achieve similar levels of literary greatness, he has also managed to update Le Carré’s Cold War settings into a recognisable and contemporary 21st century. It’s an extraordinary achievement. Herr
...more
Roman Clodia
Jan 05, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
'We're talking about a bunch of mindless bottom-feeders whose general ignorance of our way of life is tempered only by their indifference to human suffering, we're all agreed on that?'
'Is this the politicians or the killers?'
'Good point, but I meant the killers.'

Opening with a terrorist atrocity claimed by ISIS, we think we're on what has become increasingly familiar fictional territory - but, ah, this is Mick Herron, so nothing is ever what it seems...

This whole series is fabulous but I thi
...more
Maine Colonial
Feb 19, 2018 rated it it was amazing
There are so many excellent reviews already posted that I’m not going to go into a lot of detail here. What I do want to say is that this is my favorite of the Slough House series since the first book—and none of them is a dud.

Where le Carré was the master of the Cold War espionage story and nailed that sense of betrayal lurking around every corner, Mick Herron writes for our era, when there is no defined enemy state, but there are mindless agents of all kinds of screwed-up organizations who cou
...more
Sid Nuncius
Jan 12, 2018 rated it it was amazing
This is another absolutely brilliant book from Mick Herron. It is rare for me to rave so unreservedly about a book, never mind a series, but Herron's Slough House series has been outstanding. London Rules is the fifth; its predecessor, Spook Street, was perhaps not quite as good as the others (which still meant it was at least as good as anything else I read last year), but this is possibly the best so far. It can be read as a stand alone book, but for maximum enjoyment I would recommend reading ...more
James
Feb 26, 2018 rated it liked it
Shelves: fiction, thriller
Another entry in the Slough House series. On the blurb at the back somebody confidently avers that Mick Herron is the John Le Carre of our time. A claim that does both authors a disservice. I mean John Le Carre is clearly the John Le Carreof our time, but that aside, Mick Herron is very fond and getting fonder by the day of sketching dysfunctional work environments and revelling in his main character Jackson Lamb. I dont think he has the time or inclination to throw a mirror on moral ambiguity w ...more
Deb Jones
Mick Herron can't write enough of his Slough House series; each of the books in the series is a gem with quirky characters and serpentine plots. The author's use of humor makes what could be just a good tale into a thoroughly enjoyable spy story.
Marie
Jul 14, 2019 rated it it was amazing
It somehow seems appropriate to finish this iconoclastic, hilarious novel on Bastille Day!
JustHB
Apr 01, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a really odd book. I can't decide whether it is utterly brilliant, or complete farce. Or chillingly realistic. I think I'm siding towards a preference and I'm intrigued enough by the totally unique writing style to want to read another book. Like nothing I've ever read before.
Kate
Loved this. Witty, clever and sharp. Fantastic writing. I was a little muddled early on as I hadn't read any of the earlier books but I'm determined to put that right for the future - I've just bought the backlist. I have no idea why I've missed this series. I really regret it now.
Rowena Hoseason
Feb 27, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2018
Mick Herron launches London Rules with a simply gob-smacking opening chapter. You think you understand exactly what’s happening – just another terrorist atrocity among the daily diet of disaster – and then he pulls the rug right out from under with a single didn’t-see-that-coming sentence. It’s absurdly accomplished, and sets the tone for the fifth of these contemporary political commentaries.

If you haven’t met the Slow Horses before then London Rules will make little or no sense at all. Best to
...more
Mal Warwick
Jul 19, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Ever since World War II, espionage has been a favorite topic of thriller writers. Authors such as Eric Ambler and Graham Greene set the tone, and some of their novels are regarded as classics of the genre to this day. In the years since their heyday (the 1930s and 40s), the genre has veered off in two directions. John le Carré took the more serious approach with the psychological depth and moral qualms of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963). By contrast, Ian Fleming's Casino Royale (1952), ...more
Chip
May 14, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: mystery-thriller
It is a very rare book that I rate five stars - and this book is unquestionably five stars.

Herron's Slow Horses / Slough House books just keep getting better. The characterization, the suspense, the humor, the plotting (both of the novel's characters and its author) and, good lord, the artful turn(s) of phrase.

"You look like all your birthdays came at once." "I look happyto you?" "No, old. Am I the only one 'round here that speaks English?"

"Which would make the attempt on Ho ISIS too. And, frank
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
Reading the Detec...: London Rules by Mick Herron - SPOILER Thread 13 23 Jun 23, 2019 12:44AM  
Reading the Detec...: London Rules by Mick Herron 28 22 Jun 20, 2019 11:12PM  

Readers also enjoyed

  • Agent Running in the Field
  • The Final Game
  • Westwind
  • Hitler's Peace
  • Box 88
  • In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22)
  • A Song for the Dark Times (Inspector Rebus #23)
  • Metropolis (Bernie Gunther, #14)
  • The Moroccan Girl
  • The Smiling Man (Aidan Waits #2)
  • Firefly
  • I Have Sinned (McGarry Stateside, #2)
  • A Treachery of Spies (Capitaine Inés Picaut #2)
  • Greeks Bearing Gifts (Bernie Gunther, #13)
  • Big Sky (Jackson Brodie, #5)
  • Disaster Inc (McGarry Stateside, #1)
  • A Divided Spy (Thomas Kell, #3)
  • The Day That Never Comes (The Dublin Trilogy #2)
See similar books…
912 followers
Mick Herron was born in Newcastle and has a degree in English from Balliol College, Oxford. He is the author of six books in the Slough House series as well as a mystery series set in Oxford featuring Sarah Tucker and/or P.I. Zoë Boehm. He now lives in Oxford and works in London.

Other books in the series

Slough House (7 books)
  • Slow Horses (Slough House, #1)
  • Dead Lions (Slough House, #2)
  • Real Tigers (Slough House, #3)
  • Spook Street (Slough House, #4)
  • Joe Country (Slough House #6)
  • Slough House (Slough House #7)

News & Interviews

Need another excuse to treat yourself to a new book this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. To create our...
30 likes · 15 comments
“When he’d joined the Service he’d been in Psych Eval, which had involved evaluating operational strategies for psychological impact – on targets as well as agents – but had also meant carrying out individual assessments; who was stressed, who’d benefit from a change of routine, and who was a psychopath. Every organisation had a few, usually at management level, and it was handy to know who they were in case there was an emergency, or an office party.
Pg 243”
3 likes
“He eyed her critically. "You look like all your birthdays came at once."
"I look happy to you?"
"No, old. Am I the only one round here speaks English?”
3 likes
More quotes…