Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Here I Stand: Stories That Speak For Freedom” as Want to Read:
Here I Stand: Stories That Speak For Freedom
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Here I Stand: Stories That Speak For Freedom

by
4.13  ·  Rating details ·  455 ratings  ·  76 reviews
Did you know that ... government spies can turn on your phone and use the microphone to listen to your conversations? ... that lesbian and gay relationships are illegal in 78 countries and can be punished by death? ... that Amnesty recently recorded the highest number of executions globally for more than 25 years?

Through short stories and poetry, twenty-five leading autho
...more
Paperback, 310 pages
Published 2017 by Walker Books (first published August 4th 2016)
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  455 ratings  ·  76 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Here I Stand: Stories That Speak For Freedom
Trish
Sep 13, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
We all here know the term book hangover. We all know what it means.


This book had a similar effect on me while being a completely different case. Let me explain:
=> It was similar because it made me cry and stopped me from being able to think of anything else or concentrate on anything else.
=> It was completely different because there are no "characters" here. The stories in this book are either original accounts from people affected or inspired by true stories.

Amnesty International has collected
...more
Whispering Stories
Here I Stand, is a beautiful, pragmatic book by amnesty International, that looks at human rights across the globe.

Through a series of twenty-five short stories, poems, and even a few comic strips, written by well known and renown authors, you are given different insights into how human rights are being trampled on, not only by other individuals, but by some communities as a whole.

From a young boy being ‘used’ as a way to keep his mother alive by her new boyfriend, after his father died, to a te
...more
Rowena
Jan 20, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fav
“They may take our lives , But they will never take our freedom”
Here I stand..⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

This book is so real and amazing inside and out. It’s a short stories and poems written by 25 authors around the world

They shade some lights on real and sensitive issues in each and every society such as ; Racism, Child busing, LGBT rights ,Human rights in general , Suicide ,How to cope with pain ,Refugees , Terrorism and so on.
Through fiction stories and poetry


Here i stand is more than great it’s precious ,
...more
Sarah
Aug 29, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Hugely important, excellent variety of issues and authors.
Alex (PaperbackPiano)
This was an extremely powerful and worthwhile read. I'm really glad that I finally decided to pick this one up. Anthologies will always be a mixed bag, with some hits and some misses, but this one was incredibly strong with the majority of stories feeling high quality and conveying valuable messages. I would normally only rate an anthology at 3 or 3.5 stars due to the varied mix of styles but this one is a solid 4 minimum.

I'm not going to talk about every story but I'll mention a few that stood
...more
Ashleigh (a frolic through fiction)
description
Originally posted on A Frolic Through Fiction

*Thank you to the publisher for sending me a copy of this book. This in no way affects my opinion*

RATED 3.5/5 STARS


Oh, where to start with this book.

A collection of short stories, poems and even a couple of doodles/comic strips, you get so many things in this book. They all handle topics relating to the rights of freedom – of course, all of which being quite large, heavy subjects. But considering they’re short stories, they’re done really well. They’
...more
El
Mar 19, 2019 rated it really liked it
I loved reading this book, it’s such a great collection of short stories!
They were the perfect length, not too long (although I would have liked some to be a little longer to explain more) which made binge reading them so easy!
They all made me think, it was an important feature that they never told you what to think, they just gave you a story and left you to draw a conclusion.

The footnotes were great - allowing an insight to the story, although I wish more of the stories had one!
And I loved ho
...more
Oda Renate
Mar 14, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Really emotional,important book.
Okay yes I skipped some but in these anthologies you can do it now and then.
Barbara Band
Sep 19, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book of 25 short stories and poems explores various elements of human rights. It is not a comfortable read, covering issues such as child abuse, racism, LGBT rights, suicide, domestic abuse and human trafficking but then the violation of people's human rights isn't comfortable either. However, there is a lot of inference and nothing too specific or graphic so would be suitable for mid/older teens. Each author has written a brief explanation about the basis of their story which adds depth an ...more
Louise / Daisy May Johnson
There's a lot to love about this pained, poised collection of short stories and much of that comes from its careful and classy curation. The authors, ranging from Frances Hardinge through to Sarah Crossan, and Chris Riddell, sit alongside a foreword by a human rights lawyer and an afterword, of sorts, consisting of an interview with Chelsea Manning. Most contributions to the collection have a brief afterwood explaining the context behind the piece, though one of the strongest - 'Barley Wine' by ...more
ery
Jan 22, 2018 rated it really liked it
i wasn’t sure how to rate this book as it’s a collection of short stories and there were some that were better than others but as a whole, i think it is an important read, especially for a younger audience (young as in like 12-15, maybe 11?) sometimes the stories were a bit confronting but sugar coating things would be the exact opposite of what this book is trying to achieve.
Zohal
Mar 09, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
I really appreciate this anthology of short stories and poems. I enjoyed the first half more as the stories were more engaging and creative. The second half was not as engaging, but overall this is a very powerful anthology that will make you think deeply about the world around you. I highly recommend it!
Cote Cabrera
Sep 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I liked some stories more than others but overall it was a beautiful collection of short stories about freedom and human rights. Very important read if you want to gain some perspective on some issues that happen around the world. Highly recommend.
Farah1307
Jul 23, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Heartbreaking and important
Loved the first story the most <3
...more
Victoria Hughes
Jun 28, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book refuses to let you go. It refuses to let you go about your life ignoring the safety nets you have around you, which others so painfully lack. It was horrific. And it was necessary.
Caroline
Feb 12, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a book of 26 different stories, all circling around the issue of Human Rights. There are a couple of poems and one comic strip. Well known authors have written the stories and they are all moving. The stories are good to read on their own, but would also make an excellent story starter for PSHE lessons or assemblies around human rights. Definitely a book that every school should have.
Lily
Nov 06, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
These short stories are wonderfully written - both heartwarming and spine chilling.
The fact that these stories will confront us, just proves the need for them to be read.

A powerful and moving read for everyone.
emi
Nov 14, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: nonfiction
This book seemed like a really appropriate read this week with everything going on in the world... As always with short story collections, i liked some more than others, my favourites being Neil Gaiman and Amy Leon's contributions.
Rachael
Aug 22, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Very important stories. It was nice to read a book of mixed media with positive messages of awareness.
Rachel
Feb 23, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Overall a great read. Extremely powerful and evocative. This was actually the first time I read an anthology of short stories cover to cover. (Usually I just read the stories I find I interesting with short story collections like these) I liked the short stories better than the poems but I’m not really a huge poetry fan in general so that explains for it. Though I must say some short stories were better than others but that’s with all short story collections as it’s kind of like a hit or miss wi ...more
Martha
Trigger Warning - sexual and physical violence

"The greatest threats to liberty today come not from terrorism but the fear of terrorism and our politicians' misguided quest for absolute security."


This is a collection of short stories collected by Amnesty International to highlight the human rights abuses that are still pervasive across the world today. When I picked it up, I initially assumed it was true stories of people that Amnesty had worked with; but it is actually fiction from authors such
...more
Prince Arora
Jun 06, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book itself sums up the experience - 'Stories and poetry are a wonderful way of making us think, helping us understand the world and other people. More than that, they can inspire our empathy - which we need if we're to overcome prejudice.'.

I've been in this world a while now and I'd like to think that I have learnt a few meaningful lessons, some that I'll take with me to the end. I have experienced hate, prejudice, malice, unreasonable and illogical upsetting behaviour from other people; b
...more
Candra
Mar 14, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
this was such a heavy read, but i really love it and i'm glad i didn't dnf it. it's such a needed read in today's political climate. still somewhat relatable even for an indonesian like me.

it's choke full of gems. some are miss, but a lot hits me in the guts. it's just really that strong. beautiful and bold in its passion.

Only a grown man can will himself not to think.


Harvester Road: 4/5
Dulce et Decorum est.: 5/5
Glasgow Snow: 4.5/5
The Invention of Peanut Butter: 4/5
Love is a Word, Not a Sen
...more
Avril
Mar 09, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: young-adult
This book starts with a story about child sexual abuse. It includes stories about modern sex slavery, and a man on death row, and bullying that leads to suicide, and a suicide bomber, and a girl accused of witchcraft. This is not an easy book. I limited myself to one or two chapters a day so I didn’t get overwhelmed. And yet this is a collection for teenagers. I read it thinking about how important it is for children in countries like the UK and Australia to know these things (I think Tony Birch ...more
Helen
Jul 15, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
‘This book is inspired by the fact that human rights can be denied or abused even in countries like the UK or the USA, and we need to defend them constantly. Stories and poetry are a wonderful way of making us think, helping us understand the world and other people. More than that, they can inspire our empathy – which we need if we’re to overcome prejudice.’
‘Most of the content of Here I Stand is fiction, but it is rooted in truth. Frances Hardinge’s story about the child accused of being a witc
...more
Joanna
Apr 03, 2018 rated it really liked it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Henrietta
The effect this book had on me cannot be described, or put into words.
From the first word I was gripped and enthralled by every story in the anthology, and my heart shattered again and again, as I saw the harsh reality of the society we live in. Despite this though, the lasting impression of this anthology is not depression, or sadness, but instead hope and determination. The inclusion of pieces such as "I believe..." by Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell evokes such a strong reaction and desire to
...more
Linda
May 31, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"I believe that repressing ideas spreads ideas, I believe that people and books and newspapers are containers for ideas, but that burning the People will be as unsuccesful as firebombing the newspaper archives.
It's already too late. It's always too late.
The ideas are out, hiding behind people's eyes, waiting in their thoughts. They can be whispered. They can be written on walls in the dead of night. They can be drawn.
I believe that in the battle between guns and ideas, ideas will eventually win
...more
Kanzy
Jan 09, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Through a series of twenty-five short stories, poems, and even a few comic strips, written by well known and renown authors, you are given different insights into how human rights are being trampled on, not only by other individuals, but by some communities as a whole. Here I Stand, is a beautiful, expedient book by amnesty International. It is a powerful book, one not to be taken lightly. Each author, at the end of their chapter, explains why they wrote the story, and what made them choose that ...more
Hannah
Jun 28, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: mental-health
You know a short story collection is going to be pretty grim, when John Boyne is the first writer in the collection. As you can see, I'm still not over the Absolutist.

I think one thing I can say for this short story collection, is that I've never come across a short story collection where the quality throughout most, if not all the stories, is stellar. There are some short story collections where one of them drags, and lets the entire collection down; this book isn't one of them.

All of these s
...more
« previous 1 3 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Toffee
  • Proud
  • Loveless
  • We Come Apart
  • Life with Picasso
  • The Truth About Keeping Secrets
  • Looking for JJ (Jennifer Jones, #1)
  • Out of Love
  • Resist (Breathe, #2)
  • The Love Square
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here
  • Three Houses
  • Sleep, Pale Sister
  • The Infernal Machine and Other Plays
  • Les Oubliés de Vulcain
  • Paris Bagdad
  • Un piège pour Iphigénie (Un piège pour Iphigénie #1)
  • Vipère au poing
See similar books…
274 followers
Born in Glasgow in 1961 to a Scottish mother and a Nigerian father, Kay was adopted by a white couple, Helen and John Kay, as a baby. Brought up in Bishopbriggs, a Glasgow suburb, she has an older adopted brother, Maxwell as well as siblings by her adoptive parents.

Kay's adoptive father worked full-time for the Communist Party and stood for election as a Member of Parliament, and her adoptive moth
...more

Related Articles

If you haven't heard of record-smashing singer and songwriter Mariah Carey, is there any hope for you? Who else has sold more than 200 million...
47 likes · 20 comments
No trivia or quizzes yet. Add some now »