Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Squadron: Ending the African Slave Trade” as Want to Read:
Squadron: Ending the African Slave Trade
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Squadron: Ending the African Slave Trade

by
really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  16 ratings  ·  6 reviews
Despite the British being early abolitionists, a significant slave trade remained down the east coast of Africa through the mid-1800s, even after the Civil War ended it in the United States. What further undermined the British Empire was that many of the vessels involved in the trade were themselves British ships.


The Royal Navy’s response was to dispatch a squadron to patr
...more
Hardcover, 336 pages
Published November 28th 2017 by Harry N. Abrams (first published November 7th 2017)
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-37
really liked it Average rating 4.00  · 
Rating details
 ·  16 ratings  ·  6 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Squadron: Ending the African Slave Trade
Jimmy
Oct 12, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: nonfiction, history
This is an unlikely book for me to pick up. Yet I did. And I read it through. Fascinating, thorough look at the British Navy's effort to eliminate or at least slow the trade in human beings in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia in the mid-19th century. The author uses a myriad of primary sources, including court records, ships' logs, diaries, books by the ship captains themselves, etc. His detailed research allows him to insert facts such as the weather on a specific day, a person's thoughts abou ...more
Martin
May 07, 2018 rated it really liked it
Squadron is a very readable account of a little-known facet of the trade in African slaves in the Indian Ocean. Long after the trade was made illegal in the British Empire in 1807, followed by the USA in 1809 and most other European countries in the next ten years, the ownership of slaves remained legal in many countries for decades. Illegal traders in captured Africans continued to operate. The trans-Atlantic trade had effectively been stopped by the middle of the century, largely by the Royal ...more
Lisa
Jul 15, 2018 rated it really liked it
Recommended to Lisa by: SomaliBookaholic
I am indebted to Somali Bookaholic who recommended this book to me in conversation about my review of Petals of Blood. It’s a very interesting book about four British naval captains who in the mid 18th century undertook anti-slavery activity off the African coast without always having had official authority to do so.
Britain had abolished slavery, but still, there was significant trade even after the end of the American Civil War. Some of the ships involved were British operating illegally and so
...more
Elizabeth
Mar 09, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: history, non-fiction
3.5 stars.

First, the writing was excellent. Details and events were felt natural and part of the whole narrative rather than a break in the writing.

Two, this was a biography of Meara, Heath, Colomb, and Sulivan more than history but not by much.

Three, I wish the author had started the book with a general overview of slavery, the slave trade from Africa, who took part in that trade, and what happened to support and/or stop the slave trade prior to the squadron starting their work. I felt that I
...more
Michael Heath-Caldwell
Jul 30, 2018 rated it it was amazing
John Broich's book looks at one of the last great endeavours to end the slave trade off the east coast of Africa, as carried out by four British naval officers. This book explains some of the other naval officers who appear in Sir Leopold Heath's photo albums so I suppose I should write them up.
Alana
rated it really liked it
Feb 14, 2018
Rachel
rated it liked it
Dec 24, 2019
Debra Silfies
rated it really liked it
Jan 19, 2020
Mike Harper
rated it really liked it
Aug 08, 2019
Catherine
Dec 11, 2017 marked it as to-read
Booklist
Dad
rated it liked it
Jan 17, 2018
Jj Heath-Caldwell
rated it it was amazing
Nov 19, 2018
Nelly Thom
rated it it was amazing
Aug 26, 2019
aspasiacat
rated it liked it
Jun 03, 2018
Peggy Ann
rated it really liked it
Mar 05, 2018
Madison
rated it really liked it
Apr 29, 2018
Susan Paxton
rated it really liked it
Mar 22, 2018
Jerome
marked it as to-read
Mar 02, 2017
Inventory
marked it as to-read
Aug 18, 2017
Barry Sierer
marked it as to-read
Nov 25, 2017
Benjamin Finley
marked it as to-read
Nov 28, 2017
Eli Price
marked it as to-read
Nov 29, 2017
Matt
marked it as to-read
Dec 05, 2017
Diane
marked it as to-read
Dec 06, 2017
Anna
marked it as to-read
Dec 06, 2017
Rebecca
marked it as to-read
Dec 29, 2017
Ina Cawl
marked it as to-read
Dec 30, 2017
Mika
marked it as to-read
Dec 31, 2017
Olivia Morales
marked it as to-read
Jan 04, 2018
Dylan Bateman
marked it as to-read
Mar 02, 2018
Tyler Hill
marked it as to-read
Mar 08, 2018
Susan Kennedy
marked it as to-read
Mar 10, 2018
Stacy Mallory
marked it as to-read
Mar 31, 2018
Tamani
marked it as to-read
Apr 03, 2018
Jo
marked it as to-read
Apr 14, 2018
Shelley M
marked it as to-read
May 20, 2018
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Dear Edward
  • Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation
  • Immortal Born (Argeneau #30)
  • Libriomancer (Magic Ex Libris, #1)
  • The Hostile Game (The Hostile, #3)
  • Lonely House
  • I Dream of Zenia with the Bright Red Teeth
  • Who Slays the Wicked (Sebastian St. Cyr, #14)
  • Codex Born (Magic Ex Libris, #2)
  • Macbeth (Hogarth Shakespeare)
  • To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World
  • Lieberman's Folly (Abe Lieberman, #1)
  • Greeks Bearing Gifts (Bernie Gunther, #13)
  • Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics
  • First, Kill the Lawyers: A Holland Taylor Mystery
  • Never Cross a Vampire (Toby Peters, #5)
  • City of Endless Night (Pendergast, #17)
  • The Son
See similar books…

Related Articles

There's something great about a paperback book: They're perfect book club choices, you can throw them in your bag and go, and they've been out in...
57 likes · 17 comments