Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Long Night at the Vepsian Museum: The Forest Folk of Northern Russia and the Struggle for Cultural Survival” as Want to Read:
Long Night at the Vepsian Museum: The Forest Folk of Northern Russia and the Struggle for Cultural Survival
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Long Night at the Vepsian Museum: The Forest Folk of Northern Russia and the Struggle for Cultural Survival

2.50  ·  Rating details ·  2 ratings  ·  2 reviews
This book takes readers to the village of Sheltozero in northern Russia. It highlights a tiny community of indigenous people called Veps, known colloquially as "the forest folk" for their intense closeness and affiliation with the forests in their ancestral territories. Davidov uses a tour of the local museum to introduce a cast of human and non-human characters from tradi ...more
Paperback, 160 pages
Published November 16th 2017 by University of Toronto Press
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Long Night at the Vepsian Museum, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Long Night at the Vepsian Museum

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

Showing 1-4
Average rating 2.50  · 
Rating details
 ·  2 ratings  ·  2 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Long Night at the Vepsian Museum: The Forest Folk of Northern Russia and the Struggle for Cultural Survival
Patricia Robin Robin
It's one of the only resources out there on the Veps and as such is a valuable resource. That said, it's neither fish nor fowl. It wavers between an interesting story about the people which I would like to know more about OR it's about academic research which I would like to know more about. It's just not worth the extremely high price.
Jen
May 25, 2019 rated it it was ok
Eh. An interesting, if terribly thin, volume. The subject matter is well presented. The prose is fluid and easy to read. But it's just not terribly intellectually engaging. Those without an independent curiosity in the population under study here will find little to sink their teeth into and keep them reading. The ethnography is almost exclusively expository, with scant connection to any social theory or analysis. The bibliography for the entire book is barely 5 pages long--which for an ethnogra ...more
Florence
marked it as to-read
Oct 14, 2017
Rebecca Garber
is currently reading it
Jul 19, 2019
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »