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The Evolution of Racism: Human Differences and the Use and Abuse of Science
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The Evolution of Racism: Human Differences and the Use and Abuse of Science

3.94  ·  Rating details ·  35 Ratings  ·  5 Reviews
Ever since Charles Darwin first wrote about the "descent of man, " the differences between the human races have been the subject of the most enduring controversy over the "origin of the species." Evolutionary theory has been used and abused as a scientific justification or intellectual weapon by racists and anti-racists alike. Careers have been made and broken, lives dedic ...more
Hardcover, 318 pages
Published July 1st 1994 by Simon & Schuster (first published 1994)
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Melissa
Feb 29, 2016 rated it really liked it
This book is an in depth discussion of evolution, specifically how it has been used and misused by people to justify their ideas concerning race. It begins with Darwin's "The Origin of the Species" and continues to the present with the identification of genetic markers. I wanted to read this book to refresh in my mind Social Darwinism was/is, to reacquaint myself with arguments regarding eugenics, and to acquaint myself with advances in physical anthropology and genetics. I also thought the hist ...more
NtMagpie
Jul 18, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone
Shelves: nonfiction
An absolutely amazing book on how Evolution has been used as a tool to justify racism. Well and engagingly written, it was one of the 2 nonfiction books that I devoured cover to cover in college (as opposed to skimming through just to pass a test).
Erica
Jun 23, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone
This book starts with the beginning process and publication of The Origin of Species by Charles Darwin. It takes the reader on a colorful and insightful ride of the distortion and abuse of the Evolution of Man that was used to justify racism with "scientific evidence".
Konstantinos Sapardanis
too garrulous for my liking
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Jul 27, 2011 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
:P. I really wasn't sure AT ALL what the author's point was
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Pat Shipman is a professor of anthropology at Penn State University. Coauthor of the award-winning The Ape in the Tree, she writes for American Scientist and lives in Moncure, North Carolina.
More about Pat Shipman