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Yellow & Pink

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  258 ratings  ·  61 reviews
Steig's witty dialectic on the nature of existence
Paperback, 32 pages
Published April 1st 1988 by Square Fish (first published 1984)
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Community Reviews

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Average rating 4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  258 ratings  ·  61 reviews


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Luisa Knight
And here you have it, in picture-book form, evolution getting debunked by illustrating (no pun intended) just how silly and improbable it is for it all to have come about. A win for intelligent design!

Ages: 5 - 10

Cleanliness: the book does not mention God, though it points to intelligent design. It ends with neither of the marionettes knowing who their Maker is; a question I would have preferred answered and not left hanging.

**Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offe
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Karin Breidenthal
This is a great introduction to a child on the subject of creation versus evolution. It's so simple but very engaging. I've enjoyed reading this book over and over to my children.
Dianna
Feb 12, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is not a story, it's an argument. I thought it was compelling, but I'm surprised my four-year-old made it through. Not the best bedtime story.
Starla
Sep 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I love this children's book that uses the power of a witty story to make a point without lecturing or preaching. As two wooden figures ponder how they came into existence, the narrative raises questions and possibilities and considers the plausibility of each as well. It ends with a bit of a twist and leaves the reader with plenty to think about. The creative story line and simple illustrations make it a children's book, but it has some real depth about the topic of the origin of life.
Zebardast Zebardast
This is a very silly introduction to a child on the subject of creation versus evolution.
Michelle
"Books are not a savior, but they can lead to the source of salvation."
Gladys Hunt
Steven
Jun 18, 2019 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
That feeling you get when you discover far too late in life that a beloved children's author dappled in pudding-brained, fairy tale, creationist claptrap. Having just finished this short little book I am currently nothing much more than a giant, living eyeroll emoji. A big shout out to all of the adults out there who, by design or accident, managed to shield me from this sort of stupidity as a child!
Jeremy
Oct 18, 2017 rated it really liked it
Read to Kids' Quest class tonight, in connection with catechism questions 9–10. We can't see God, because He doesn't have a body like we do; but He's everywhere. It's obvious that we have a Maker, even if we can't see Him.

I've read another edition to Kate.
Natasha
May 20, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: ambleside
Great book for introducing young children to the concept of intelligent design versus "a random accident". I wasn't 100% satisfied with the ending, but it would make a good conversation started for slightly older children (I would say age 5+).
Danette
Sep 02, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: picture-books
Fantastic!
9/2/19 Read with Naomi and Julia
Kristine Johnson
Jun 25, 2019 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Talk about comparing apples and oranges and strawman arguments. Typical from the "ID" advocates.
Tina Hoggatt
The mind of the man. An existential reverie with humor (naturally) from the brilliant William Steig.
Stephanie
An argument in favor of intelligent design.
Amie
Jun 28, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This book is great! It presents the creation/evolution debate in a child friendly format. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Dylan Teut
Mar 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
We want to know all of the "whys" and "hows" of life.... And for a lot of things.... There just aren't answers. And instead of trying to figure it all out, let's just enjoy the beautiful days.
Carol
Oct 03, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is the epitome of a great picture book! Two wooden figures come alive while lying in the sun and speculate about how they each came to exist. They then both go through scenarios trying to explain how they came to be what they are until their supposed maker comes along. William Steig was particularly fascinated with the story of “Pinoccino” which leads one to see a connection between this tale and that of the old puppeteer. This simple, yet esoteric tale could also be appreciated by adults a ...more
Alan
Feb 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
An elegant depiction of the question of the ages!

Who hasn't wondered who we are, where we came from and where we're going? This fable is as profound in its simplicity as it is simple in its profundity. It asks the age old question that arose eons ago in the garden and forces us to consider its answer even today. The question is deeper than simply asking how and when, it's asking, "Why?" and our answer to it shapes our personal philosophies about life and the world around us.
Josiah
May 03, 2010 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Yellow & Pink is an unusual picture book, especially in that it appears to be an allegory about the human struggle between the various explanations for our existence and, ultimately, the existence of all things. Yellow and Pink, each a kind of humanoid being, come up with their own theories about how they might have been formed. Pink says that they obviously must have been created by someone, while Yellow figures that they probably came about by some kind of accident. The issue is never rea ...more
Elayna Gilbert
Apr 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Yellow and Pink is a very interesting picture book! In this book the wooden characters come alive while lying in the sun and talk about how they each came to exist. They both go through scenarios trying to explain how they came to be what they are. This book appears to be about the human struggle between the many explanations for our existence and ultimately the existence of all things.William Steig was particularly fascinated with the story of “Pinocchio” which leads one to see a connection bet ...more
Beverly
Apr 22, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: pbf-general
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Aneesa
Oct 21, 2008 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: EVERYONE in the world, but especially moms with children
Such a splendid book! I picked it up by accident thinking it was a new book---what a pleasant surprise. This book subtly undermines the theory of evolution in a simple, straightforward, humorous way. It's the story of two wooden puppets, who find themselves on the ground and don't know how they got there. The one determines that he must have been formed by accident, because he is much too intricately detailed to have been actually made by someone. It is well written, wonderfully illustrated, and ...more
Ilana Waters
Nov 29, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I loved the spare use of color and simplicity of this book. On the surface, it appears to be an argument in favor of intelligent design. Regarding it being "propaganda," (as a few amazon reviews suggest) there's no evidence that the author DIDN'T believe in evolution. I actually don't think the watchmaker analogy (which the book seems to proport) is incompatible with Darwinism. So I felt the book was a lovely way to introduce children to the idea that there may be something out there bigger than ...more
Angela
Feb 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Wow. This was a very deep psychological book about evolution and religion put into a children's book. The yellow one believes he was made by accident and the pink one believes he was made by someone. Each of the puppets make arguments about why their theory is correct but in the end they agree to disagree and stop arguing. I think everyone needs to read this book, even some adults.
Jeremy
Read this to Kate when she was 5. Not sure she was able to grasp it yet, but it's worth re-reading.

Marvin Olasky calls this book "a great pro-creation children’s book" here.

I've read another edition to our Kids' Quest class.
Joey Hines
Dec 28, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: family, william-steig
So cool! A picture-book existential quandary -- like Waiting for Godot, but much less depressing. Yellow and Pink are two wooden figures, both with their own opinions on where they came from (whether their existence is an accident, or whether they were created by some other being). Funny ending. But I'm a sucker for this self-aware stuff.
April West
Jul 26, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: vivisbooks
This book is whack! We got it on the clearance rack at a local toy store and it is a real mind-blower; two marionette-type dolls are lying out in the sun to dry, speculating on how they came to be there, whether they were created and by whom, and so on. Mind-boggling for the parents, but still somehow engaging for our two-year-old.
Rachel
Jan 13, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Though I gave The Amazing Bone (also by Steig) a 2 star, Yellow and Pink is a great book to discuss with kids about how complex God has made each of us (i.e. our complexity points us to our Creator; we are not accidents)

Reminded me of a less overt, You Are Special by Max Lucado. Maybe Lucado stole the puppet idea from Steig?
Vivian
Aug 03, 2007 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well, I liked this book a bit less than my parents did. But I liked it a lot better than this writer's other books, most of which are too scary for me. Although I do like the one where the kid turns into a rock.
April
May 13, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Absolute favorite book as a kid! I always had it checked out from the library. I currently own a copy that my mother gave me for my undergraduate graduation. It has been the best present I have ever received because I loved it so much.
Katelyn Patterson
Waiting for Godot, picture book style. Evolution is presented as absurd with The Creator showing up in the end giving it a very slanted perspective. I would have preferred it if it was left unanswered.
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William Steig was born in New York City in 1907. In a family where every member was involved in the arts, it was not surprising that Steig became an artist.

He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968, embarking on a new and very different career.

Steig's books reflect his conviction that children want the security of a devoted family and friends. When Sylvester, Farmer
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