Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Querida Ijeawele. Cómo educar en el feminismo” as Want to Read:
Querida Ijeawele. Cómo educar en el feminismo
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Querida Ijeawele. Cómo educar en el feminismo

4.51  ·  Rating details ·  64,830 ratings  ·  8,136 reviews

El feminismo empieza en la educación. Con su voz cálida y directa, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie dirige esta emotiva carta a una joven madre que acaba de dar a luz. En sus quince consejos, reivindica la formación de nuestros hijos en la igualdad y el respeto, el amor por los orígenes y la cultura. Una invitación a rechazar estereotipos, a abrazar el fracaso y a luchar por una s

...more
Paperback, 89 pages
Published March 2017 by Literatura Random House
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Querida Ijeawele. Cómo educar en el feminismo, please sign up.
Popular Answered Questions
Ana What is being suggested for raising girls can be used for raising boys. Encouraging boys to express themselves, and not silencing them if for example …moreWhat is being suggested for raising girls can be used for raising boys. Encouraging boys to express themselves, and not silencing them if for example they cry or say they are scared. Its about teaching them that all human beings have strengths and weaknesses, and clarifying that it does not have to do with their sex. Be the example in your son's life. If your son is hurt let him cry, scared express his fear, sad his sadness. Teach your child that there are different emotions and emotions are normal, there are some we like to feel others not ao much or not at all. When expressing anger, how to do it constructively and not destructively for example talk about it, noone should be harmed including him. Don't discourage him if he wants to wear pink, play with dolls, or play with an eazy bake oven. Most important, teach him to love and respect himself, and others. To respect everything, property, pets, plants, all.(less)
Teresa I think it was directed to girls because the letter was written for someone who has a daughter but you are right that all the advice could be used for…moreI think it was directed to girls because the letter was written for someone who has a daughter but you are right that all the advice could be used for any gender (less)

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 4.51  · 
Rating details
 ·  64,830 ratings  ·  8,136 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of Querida Ijeawele. Cómo educar en el feminismo
Emily May
Apr 16, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: feminism, 2017, nonfiction
Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not “if only.” Not “as long as.” I matter equally. Full stop.

I honestly cannot think of any author who writes essays as equally hard-hitting and utterly readable as Adichie does. Perhaps Roxane Gay's work could be said to be as compelling, or Ta-Nehisi Coates's work to be as powerful, but Adichie always comes out on top, for me, as someone who can write about important subjects with a conversational tone that makes them pageturners
...more
Ariel
Apr 28, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I wanted to write a review about how wonderful this book is, but instead I think I need to tell you how necessary this book is.

About two months ago I met with Penguin who asked me if I'd do a sponsored video for this book. Having loved We Should All Be Feminists I was thrilled to work with them, and after reading this glorious little manifesto I agreed. (They sponsored that video and supplied me with the book, but this review is unrelated... I'm two months late, after all!) I got excited to make
...more
Emily (Books with Emily Fox)
Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.

I'm actually mad that I have to return this book to the library.

I need to own this book. The author has such a way with words. She states her opinion in a matter of fact and simple way. I wish I were able to do the same but I'll have to content myself with using her quotes!

It warms my cold dead heart to know that women like her exist out there in the wor
...more
Nat
After having seen the scene below shared online, which was taken from this powerful short film, I immediately wanted to absorb myself in some much needed feminist literature. At which point I recalled the existence of Dear Ijeawele, which I'd gratefully received as an ARC.

*Trigger warning: rape.*

description description description description description description description description description description

In We Should All be Feminists, her eloquently argued and much admired essay of 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proposed that if we want a fairer world we need to ra
...more
Warda
Mar 12, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: author-of-colour
“The knowledge of cooking does not come pre-installed in a vagina.”

Chimamanda just can't do no wrong! I had the honour and the absolute pleasure of seeing and hearing her in person over the weekend in London. As expected, the event was just spectacular.

This book originated and was inspired by a friend of Chimamanda's who asked her ‘how to raise her baby girl as a feminist.’ The book is short, sweet and ridiculously impactful. The above quote is my favourite alongside many others. As she i
...more
jessica
Dec 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
‘your feminist premise should be: i matter. i matter equally. not ‘if only…’ not ‘as long as…’ i matter equally. full stop.’

once again, adichie is the voice of reason and the feminist icon we all deserve.

i dont annotate my books but, if i did, i can guarantee nearly every single word of truth in this tiny gem of a book would be highlighted and underlined. there is so much wisdom and significance nestled into this letter that i am of the strong opinion this should be mandatory reading for an
...more
Sean Barrs
“Teach her to love books. If she sees you reading she will understand that reading is valuable. Books will help her understand the world, help her express herself, and help her in whatever she wants to become.”

Reading, reading is so vitally important in understanding other people and differences. It develops empathy and it makes the world a better place. We should never restrict ourselves in life, men or women, it doesn’t matter as long as we do not full victim to the silly constraints imp
...more
Candi
Jan 22, 2021 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
4.5 stars

“Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not 'if only.' Not 'as long as.' I matter equally.”

This book is Adichie’s response to her friend’s request to help her raise a feminist daughter. A lot of her ideas are already ingrained in my mind, but I appreciated the reinforcements. I also learned a few new ideas to help empower young girls and women. I grew up in a climate that was somewhat conflicting regarding the roles of men and women. When I didn’t have a boyfriend
...more
emma
The moral of my feelings on this book is that I will read anything Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie deigns to publish. Including her correspondence.

(Because this book is a letter she wrote to her friend, not because I've been rooting through her mail.)

(Yet.)

This is a very teeny little thing and yet it packs more of a punch than most 400-page YA quasi-feminist books. So.

Safe to say I recommend.

Bottom line: If you have a spare 7 minutes, you can and should read this!!

------------

"We teach girls to be lika
...more
Brina
Apr 04, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Dear Ijeawele by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a letter she wrote to a close friend who has just given birth to a daughter. The friend has asked her to describe how to raise the daughter to be a feminist in Nigeria, a male centered country. Spelling out how to raise a feminist daughter in fifteen steps, this letter can be viewed as a companion piece to We Should All be Feminists and a manifesto of how to raise all children to view all people with respect.

Even though I recently read We Should All
...more
s.penkevich
Because social norms are created by human beings...there is no social norm that cannot be changed.

We’ve all heard the maxim that ‘change starts with you,’ which is something we must all take to heart and shoulder the responsibility. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, author of the powerful novel Americanah and the powerful TedTalk We Should All Be Feminists, reminds parents how important the idea of change beginning with them is in her letter to a close friend, recently revised and published as Dear Ij
...more
Evgnossia O'Hara
Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not “if only.” Not “as long as.” I matter equally. Full stop.


And this is all I'm gonna mention here!
Spectacular!
Read it!
...more
Éimhear (A Little Haze)
Feb 07, 2017 added it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Everyone irregardless of gender, sex, age or creed
++++

2021 Update:
Since I read this work by Adichie I have discovered that she is an author who shares very different ideologies than I do. And therefore she is an author I feel I can no longer support as I am unable to separate the art from the artist. I shall leave my review intact but remove my rating.

++++

"Teach her that the idea of 'gender roles' is absolute nonsense. Do not ever tell her that she should or should not do something because she is a girl.
'Because you are a girl' is never reas
...more
Riley
Feb 06, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This might have been even better than 'We Should All Be Feminists' which I loved a lot. I found myself nodding along to everything Adichie was saying. This is largely focused on motherhood, gender roles, and how to raise your child to be a feminist. ...more
Carol (Bookaria)
Nov 01, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction, 2017
Here's a very short book with a lot of wisdom.

Just because it's short it does not mean it is a light read, not at all.

Years ago, the author received a letter from a childhood friend who had just given birth to a baby girl. In the letter, her friend asks Chimamanda for advise on how to raise her daughter as a feminist. Oh boy, and did she deliver a response. You know she did.

The book is divided in small chapters and in each chapter there's a suggestion or topic from the author. The topics range f
...more
Whitney Atkinson
This book was so quotable. Very short but very powerful; I highlighted pretty much every other line. I don't intend on having kids, but this made me think a lot about how we train girls and boys to be and the gender roles we should avoid them adopting, and it was very empowering and great advice. ...more
April (Aprilius Maximus)
Jun 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2018
This was great, but I wish it was more trans inclusive coz she implies multiple times that all women have vaginas.
mina reads™️
This was such an amazing way to start my day 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽
Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)
*3.5/5

Unsurprisingly, after some of Adichie’s comments a couple of years ago, this is good but deeply cis-centric in its language.
Seemita
[Originally appeared here (with edits): http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/li...]

Feminism – A rather commonly used terms these days, with interpretations far and wide, but not necessarily, coherent. If among contemporary writers there is one who imparts veritable meaning and clarity to this much relevant and pertinent ideology, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie would be her name.

When a friend asked Adichie how she can raise her little daughter as a feminist, Adichie shared fifteen suggestions in form of
...more
leynes
Apr 10, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Hells bells, this was absolutely fantastic. I had to wait for over an hour at my local tax office, luckily I had this book at hand. It made the hour worthwhile.

After finishing this little book, I finally know why We Should All Be Feminists didn't woe me. Sure her TEDx talk was great and had all the right messages, but it lacked practicality. What am I supposed to do with that knowledge? How can I be and live like a feminist in a patriarchal system? Lord behold, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manif
...more
Reading_ Tam_ Ishly
"Why were we raised to speak in low tones about periods! To be filled with shame if our menstrual blood happened to stain our skirt? Periods are nothing to be ashamed of. Periods are normal and natural, and the human species would not be here if periods did not exist."

A must read. I cannot believe I took it this long to pick up this small yet powerful book.

This is the kind of non-fictional read which I feel we can introduce to kids starting age 8 onwards. Because feminism and basic ideas on gen
...more
Lisa
Nov 14, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Dear Chimamanda,

I love the fact that you still write letters, that you care and stay committed to the issues that are important to the next generation. I love the fact that you write short and anecdotal letters that can be shared between my three children and myself in a library on a dark winter afternoon.

I can't say how much it means to me that you have a voice that is clear and sharp and kind enough to reach out to both my sons and my daughter. We feel the same anger you feel, and when I rea
...more
Simon
Mar 08, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has the most incredible way with words and how to get her points across with humour and hope. This, a letter to her friend who asks her 'how do I raise my daughter feminist?', was brimming with warmth and power whilst asking us all to check ourselves and how feminist we are when we say what we do and act as feminists. ...more
Joce (squibblesreads)
4.5 stars! So important and wonderfully written and explained with examples. I wish it had been longer - I was imagining this as a collection/novel made up of vignettes with the author as a type of wise narrator... A+ material
Cindy
Jul 02, 2018 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This would probably be a good book for someone completely new to feminism, like an elementary or middle schooler, but it's not for me. I agree with Adichie's points and am glad that the book has resonated with many people. However, it was a bit too "Feminism 101" for me due to the simplicity of the content. All her points are basic knowledge most people should know and agree with already, so I am unable to take away anything new from this. Sexism is a complex issue and this book was a very shall ...more
j e w e l s
Dec 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: audio
FIVE STARS, of course!

Confession.

I need 4 more books to make my 2018 goal. Four more books in a very busy month is not realistic for me. I'm doubting my strength to power through it in December.

Solution.

Audio books. Short audio books. My Overdrive app offers a section for short audio books under three hours. Honestly, many of them are less than one hour. Hey, I read three books today!! And anyone can do it!

I've got this goal. Almost.

I'm a die-hard fan of the brilliant Adichie. I firmly believe
...more
Sara
Mar 23, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: non-fiction
As a mother of a son and daughter(s), this book speaks to me on a deeply personal level and I hope I can raise my children with a sense of what it is to be a feminist. All I want for them all is to grow up in a society that is inherently equal to all, without any biases towards what they grow up to be.

I hope they already have some idea about the values discussed here. I'm the main earner in our family, my husband and I divided the childcare equally and I would never impose supposed views on them
...more
Amanda
Dear Ijeawele is Chimanda Ngozi Adichie's response to her friend's request for advice on how to raise her baby girl a feminist. The format of the book is a letter to the baby with fifteen suggestions. I may have enjoyed reading this even more than We Should All Be Feminists.

Many of the suggestions include changing the language we use with our daughters and examining attitudes about marriage and relationships, identity, and gender roles. I feel that many of the suggestions are already widely acc
...more
Adira
There's nothing here that's mind boggling, but it is a good beginning text for people who want to learn to incorporate more feminist teachings into their parenting skills and/or life.

If I'm being super honest, I really just want Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie to start writing novels once again. Her feminist essays come across as tepid with no real depth opposed to her novels, which present a much more in-depth picture of her subject and the Nigerian culture by using a more focused approach than just l
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »

Readers also enjoyed

  • Men Explain Things to Me
  • A Room of One's Own
  • 82년생 김지영
  • Quemar el miedo: Un manifiesto (temas de hoy)
  • King Kong théorie
  • Bad Feminist
  • Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot
  • Home Body
  • Women & Power: A Manifesto
  • Cien cicatrices
  • Pequeno Manual Antirracista
  • Moi les hommes, je les déteste
  • Feminismo para principiantes
  • Feminism is for Everybody: Passionate Politics
  • Leila Khaled: Icon of Palestinian Liberation
  • Clap When You Land
  • So You Want to Talk About Race
  • Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men
See similar books…
See top shelves…
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria.

Her work has been translated into over thirty languages and has appeared in various publications, including The New Yorker, Granta, The O. Henry Prize Stories, the Financial Times, and Zoetrope. She is the author of the novels Purple Hibiscus, which won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award; Half of a Yellow Sun, which won t
...more

Articles featuring this book

You're almost there. Your Reading Challenge goal is just within reach and we're cheering for you right from the sidelines. Because...
152 likes · 53 comments
“Teach her that if you criticize X in women but do not criticize X in men, then you do not have a problem with X, you have a problem with women.” 325 likes
“Your feminist premise should be: I matter. I matter equally. Not “if only.” Not “as long as.” I matter equally. Full stop.” 252 likes
More quotes…