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Amok Koşucusu

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4.07  ·  Rating details ·  17,429 ratings  ·  1,240 reviews
On a sweltering ocean-liner travelling from India to Europe a passenger tells his story--the tale of a doctor in the Dutch East Indies torn between his duty and the pull of his emotions; a tale of power and maddening desire, of pride, shame and a headlong flight into folly.
'Amok' is one of the most intense and incisive of the tales that brought Stefan Zweig to worldwide fa
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Paperback, 60 pages
Published December 14th 2016 by Türkiye İş Bankası Kültür Yayınları (first published 1922)
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karen
no, guys, it isn't that zweig...

i am grateful for my book club for wrenching me out of the world of teen fiction, if only momentarily. even though i have been enjoying some of the teen stuff, sometimes i just want to read about someone older than myself. otherwise i just feel elderly and out of touch.

this book contains four short stories; three parts devotion, one part despair.i am not sure if this review is the road to spoiler city, but i am going to discuss the situation that links these four
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Kalliope




This is yet another gripping novella by Zweig.

In his memoirs, The World of Yesterday, he describes his method of composition. It was based on one word: trimming. He would write and write, and then his most enjoyable activity was cutting things out and paring his writing to the bone. It seems that he would cut 100,000 words to half that.

May be that is his secret for his ability to allure the reader so very fast and so unceasingly. He identified the essential, that which leads and captivates the a
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Adam Dalva
This is just a review of the title story, which Pushkin Press is selling separately as a novella. As with all Zweig novellas that I've read except for the phenomenal CHESS STORY, the fascination lies mostly in the outer frame, in which (inevitably), a writer who is essentially Stefan Zweig is approached by a strange person with a story to tell. I love that he consistently does this - it feels like a move that is at once from an older idea of literature (the "found" picaresque works, etc.) and fe ...more
Chrissie
This grabs you and doesn’t let you go!
It’s short and powerful.
View it as a psychological thriller.

In 1912 on an ocean-liner traveling from India to Europe, the novella’s unnamed narrator goes up on deck in the middle of the night to escape his sweltering, tiny, claustrophobic cabin. There, at first, he perceives only the beautifully lit night sky illuminated by the moon and brilliant stars. This contrasts with the rolling, dark waves below. Later, nearby him on the deck, he discerns a dark silho
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Rowena
May 03, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
"I had seen a new world, I had taken in turbulent, confused images that raced wildly through my mind. Now I wanted leisure to think, to analyze and organize them, make sense of all that had impressed itself on my mind." - Stefan Zweig, Amok

I can relate to the above quote so well. I love the poetic, introspective tone...

A brilliant book. It's only my second Zweig book but I love him already. Zweig is a wonderful craftsman of short stories and these ones in are just stunning. They are all tragic t
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Ila
Jun 27, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
4.5 stars. So far each of Zweig's stories has had a lasting impact on me. Ethereal by nature, they tap into that uncomfortable corner of our mind where the repressed reigns supreme. Freud's influence is obvious in the all too disturbing but nonetheless accurate portrait of his characters. Perhaps it would be beneficial to be aware of certain details of Zweig's life. A highly disturbed self, sensitive but not passionate as the Romantics, a sharp eye-only one as uniquely equipped as he could weave ...more
Matthew
[7th book of 2021. Paintings in this review by Austrian painter Egon Schiele.]

We return to some of the same facets of Zweig’s magnificent Chess which I read several years ago. Amok takes place on a boat, as the former does. It is also a novella centred around the idea of obsession and the loss of control. The title is derived from the saying “running amok”, which in turn, apparently derived from the Malay word “mengamok”, which means to make a furious and desperate charge. This is explained in t
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Maria
Jan 19, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book is a great example of the Freudian theory on the romantic suicide. How the person committed suicide as a way of harming himself and killing any other feeling to fulfill his feeling of satisfaction and love...
Despite the fact that the story can be annoying for some readers, I think it reveals some of the inner struggle the main character has towards his lover and how he jilt her… The main conflict of not healing this pain was not clear to others in the story, so he decided to be Amok as
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Monica Carter
Jun 01, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Stefan Zweig is not your typical Viennese novelist, journalist, playwright and biographer. He and his wife committed a double suicide in 1942. Suicide is a touchy subject in the Land of the Free. We can't withstand the guilt suicide suggests in the hard-working and God Fearing U.S. of A.

Frankly, there is no glamour in it here.

I am not suggesting it by any means, but it is interesting to note that in other countries such as Japan, China and India, suicide is viewed as a more virtuous, perhaps eve
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Diane S ☔
Sep 25, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Thought soon.
Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly
The novel itself says the "Amok" is Malay in origin and indeed it is also considered a Tagalog word. Another Tagalog word for it is "hurumentado"--someone doing a suicidal run that involves indiscriminate attacks/killings and usually ends up in the hurumentado's own death. Zweig's Amok, a doctor of medicine, theorized that the cause of this "going on the rampage, a sort of human form of rabies...a paroxysm of murderous, mindless monomania which isn't comparable to any alcoholic poisoning" has so ...more
Abubakar Mehdi
Dec 13, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Amok is, undoubtedly, one of my most favorite stories. It has everything in it, over brimming with tension, passion, morbid infatuation, colonialism, existential crisis and what not. It withholds in itself innumerable emotions, thoughts and experience that can't be put to paper by anyone. Anyone but Stefan Zweig. He is one of his kind in the craft mingling fiction with the reality of human psychology.
This is my absolute favorite.
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Cphe
Not lengthy but does manage to convey quite a bit. A middle of the road read as I didn't find the characters particularly appealing. Did however enjoy the story unfolding through the eyes of an unknown narrator. ...more
Shanu
Mar 15, 2015 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 1001
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Catherine Vamianaki
I love his books. This one touched me. It deserves 5 star.
Laura
According to Wikipedia Amok "also spelled amuk, from the Malay meaning "mad with uncontrollable rage") is a term that is used for a sudden outburst, usually aggressive or violent, and is preceded by a dissociative episode of brooding over some perceived wrong towards a person or object."

The plot revolves describes the instantaneous and violent passion of a German doctor working in a Dutch colony in Asia, by a beautiful English woman who asks for his help in a very special moment.

The sudden feel
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Swati
Aug 15, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Never thought I'd be picking up another Zweig within the span of a month! My first was his novella, The Chess Story, which I liked the most.

This book contains four different stories, but they all have a common morbid theme. The lead characters of these stories are ordinary people, driven by desire and devotion bordering on obsession, without which they are left with nothing but despair - hollow and lifeless.

My order of preference is, Leporella, Amok, followed by Incident On Lake Geneva, and las
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Ben
Mar 13, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
Dark stories with colorful prose.
Missy J
Unwillkürlich, unwillkürlich, unwillkürlich... (German word for involuntarily, instinctively, automatically...). Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) was an Austrian writer from a Jewish merchant family, who became extremely popular throughout the world in the 1920 and 30s. His most celebrated work is Chess Story. He was heavily influenced by Sigmund Freud and in this short story collection, the reader can clearly feel that. The writing is very introspective and slow. Some may love it, some may hate it. Ste ...more
Alex
Aug 10, 2009 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Superb ! - Nobody, just nobody could get even close.
Zweig is unsurpassed Maestro in the genre of the short psychological story !!!

The life is burnt in Amok with the fierce fire passion
Emotions run on high, like live volcano at eruption
The spark of human tragedy and pain of soul's despair
Death, doom of suicide and fatal end of unrequited love affair
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Titus
(Note: My edition of this book contains three of Zweig's novellas: 'Amok', 'Letter From an Unknown Woman' and 'The Invisible Collection')

I believe Hemingway's theory of iceberg prose can be perfectly applied to Stefan Zweig's writting. During his lifetime, Zweig wrote mostly biographies and novellas, the latter being as short as they are engaging. Written in a clean and polished style, Zweig's stories are characterized by an accessibility that masks their complexity. Here is an author interested
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Catherine Vamianaki
A grest book
Brian Reynolds
Oct 30, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was an intense 88 page read and, as with the other Zweigs I’ve read, is a compelling well-written story. However, this one evoked largely uncomfortable feelings that made this story not quite as satisfying as most other Zweigs. This is largely due to the thoughts and actions of the doctor who is relating his story to our narrator in the dark of night on an ocean liner sailing back to Europe from India, southeast Asia and Australia.
At first I found the doctor character fairly unusual. On re
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Kristin
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Melissa
Feb 14, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I find myself so conflicted with so many of these #Reading1001 books. There is so much wrong with this story (Imperialism, sexism, racism, etc) and yet the core story is still important....women’s horrible choices, which sadly haven’t changed much from when this was written in 1922 until today, almost 100 years later.

This story is about an obsessed man, who treats a woman abominably, and her equally horrible choices between of a life risking abortion or a reputation destroying pregnancy.
Becky
On a night when the moon has cast its brightest sheen over the darkest night sky, I will think of Zweig! This is because I have experienced the most beautiful moonlight reveries in several of his short stories. When gazing upon the brightest star in the sky on a moonless night, I will think of Francois, the waiter from The Star Above The Forest, because I will remember how I cried for him as he stared at that star above the trees of that forest. When I think of my Star Man ;), I will often be re ...more
Suad Alhalwachi
Jan 19, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Oh my god, I was so fidgety thinking that the doctor is going to kill this poor beautiful woman until the last few pages when I discovered the real story. Amook is a name for a disease where a person starts to run and maybe kill anyone in front of him or her. The story is fulfilling and weird. It surely had enticed me to go on cruises and write about the stories of the people I would meet on the cruise. I think I will like that a lot.

The writer was true to his words and had been able to transcr
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Graeme
My babushka told me to read Zweig and I finally took her great advice. Now I want to read everything he ever wrote. I love that driving feeling coming from reading a fantastic writer for the first time and obsessing over them.
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Reading 1001: Amok by Stefan Zweig 12 24 Apr 26, 2020 06:28PM  
Play Book Tag: Amok, by Stefan Zweig - 4 stars 1 9 Feb 26, 2020 12:51PM  
Goodreads Librari...: Please delete this edition of Amok 3 21 Mar 31, 2015 06:59AM  
Boxall's 1001 Bo...: Amok by Stefan Zweig 8 60 Dec 03, 2014 10:39AM  

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Stefan Zweig was one of the world's most famous writers during the 1920s and 1930s, especially in the U.S., South America, and Europe. He produced novels, plays, biographies, and journalist pieces. Among his most famous works are Beware of Pity, Letter from an Unknown Woman, and Mary, Queen of Scotland and the Isles. He and his second wife committed suicide in 1942.

Zweig studied in Austria, France
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