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Square One: The Foundations of Knowledge

4.19  ·  Rating details ·  27 ratings  ·  4 reviews
"Truth is discoverable. I'm certain of it. It's not popular to say. It's not popular to think. But I know it's true."

So begins an examination into the most fundamental questions in philosophy. Does objective truth exist? Can we know anything with certainty? Are there true logical contradictions?

Steve Patterson answers emphatically, "We can know absolute, certain, and obj
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Kindle Edition, 137 pages
Published November 28th 2016
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Rachel Francon
Sep 26, 2018 rated it did not like it
I can't offer a full review here because, frankly, this is one of those books that's not worth a full reading. In 'truth" to use a word that the creator of this book tends to be fond of using as almost a punctuation mark after every page or so, this is not at all a book...but more or less a pamphlet off the sort that the hari Krishna's used to hand out at airports...

After a few chapters of the elevator music which Patterson so earnestly composes, no doubt he is doing work on the level of a Mozar
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Greg Gauthier
Dec 29, 2016 rated it liked it
Shelves: logic, epistemology
My full review can be read at my blog: Exiting The Cave

Here is an excerpt:

The book is a relatively short read (even as a slow reader, it only took me about 6 hours to finish it, including taking notes), and I found it engaging, well structured, and passionately argued. For anyone interested in an overview in plain language of the traditional Rationalist philosophical position, this book is an excellent first step for beginners. Though the book does leave many questions unanswered (I will highlig
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J.j.
Jul 22, 2017 rated it really liked it
Should one not blindly reject "logic" out of hand as some sort of "old white male social construct" then this short, yet weighty, book would benefit any reader in terms of rational argument formulation. Probably best shelved in the "philosophy" section of your library, the author ultimately acknowledges the potentially unpopular position of an omnipotent being constrained by logic's laws rather than the other way around. Diving into greatest detail in illuminating the lack of existence for any t ...more
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Rocky White
Apr 22, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: nonfiction
I give the book three stars which means it met my expectations. If you're looking for a book that gives the very basic first step to learning about or studying philosophy then I think you'll like the book.

As the title suggests, this is the very first step of thinking about philosophy. A lot of the book is spent defining logic. However, the author does take time to answer, using the logic and foundation of knowledge he explains first, to answer some basic paradoxes. For example, 'what is the soun
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“Before gathering any data, one must have concepts about the data being gathered. These are conceptual categories, meanings, and relationships that are all pre-empirical. They are purely theoretical. Imagine” 0 likes
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