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Poverty of Spirit

4.34  ·  Rating details ·  115 Ratings  ·  15 Reviews
An inclusive language version of the modern spiritual classic, an exquisitely beautiful meditation on the incarnation, on what it means to be fully human, and on finding the face of God hidden in our neighbors.
Paperback, 64 pages
Published March 1st 1998 by Paulist Press (first published 1994)
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booklady
Mar 05, 2009 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Everyone!
Recommended to booklady by: Retreat in Daily Life
"Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven." Matthew 5:3

Poverty of Spirit by Johannes Baptist Metz seemed like such a simple book the first time I read it. Perhaps I was just so overwhelmed by everything else to do with Retreat in Daily Life -- the term given to St. Ignatian Spiritual Exercises when they are conducted over a six month period verses the usual thirty day intensive seminar format.

However, the simplicity of Poverty of Spirit is comparable to that of the in
...more
Tina
Feb 10, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology
A brilliant and inspirational disquisition on the true meaning of "the poor in spirit" and the humility that is its essence. A small book to return to, by one of the most influential Catholic theologians of the twentieth century. (His work was fundamental to the development of Liberation Theology, and influenced the Second Vatican Conference.) Highly recommended.
Ken Peters
May 26, 2017 rated it really liked it
I've read this little book three times. It was due to what I've felt God has been speaking to me about lately that I decided to read it most recently. After all, given how typically self-reliant I can tend to be, I knew it would do me no harm to be reminded of the importance of poverty of spirit. Though there's much in this book that I still don't fully grasp, I was particularly stirred by the author's description of our propensity to resist poverty of spirit. But Metz makes a clear case for the ...more
Brian Hohmeier
Jul 31, 2017 rated it it was ok
Metz is a prisoner to existentialism's moment, leading his apparent exposition on the incarnation to be anachronistic, unduly spiritualized and, ironically, poor. To his credit, his wandering strings of poeticized, universalizing assertions lend his short work an enthusiasm that could almost be mistaken as mysticism.
Jose Sandino B.
Jun 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Maravilloso!

Es para deleitarse en la presencia de Dios, en la oración, en el silencio tan necesario en estos tiempos que vivimos.
Este pequeño libro hay que saborearlo con todo el amor que buscamos en Dios. Llenense de el!
Grace Guzan
“We must learn to accept ourselves in the painful experiment of living. We must embrace the spiritual adventure of becoming human, moving through the many stages that lie between birth and death.” Poverty of Spirit, written by Johannes Baptist Metz, is a short novel that through scriptural evidence, explains how we empty ourselves and become impoverished for God. It gives the reader insight on the true meaning of humanity through Christ. The book begins by describing human existence. Metz unpack ...more
Kimberly
Feb 08, 2017 rated it really liked it
Great short read!! It's only 52 pages but crammed full and pretty dense. It had some great thoughts that I will have to chew on for a while. Definitely give it a go!
Mathew Leonard
Jan 26, 2017 rated it it was amazing
This work cuts to the depth of what all of humanity experiences and responds to, the innate feeling of poverty within our soul. An extremely helpful read for those hungry and thirsty for a deeper walk with Christ.
Sergio Pages
Feb 11, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This book ties really well with the second week of the spiritual exercises of Ignatious of Loyola. Especially as it pertains to Jesus humanity.
Bruce
Jan 19, 2014 rated it it was ok
A couple of insights with a lot of double-talk. Not at all compelling.
Dawn Haglund
Aug 28, 2007 rated it it was amazing
I think this book I've given away to people more than any other! Great little book that gives one alot to think about --
Karli
Jul 16, 2008 rated it it was amazing
One of my favorite books... again, I'm not saying I agree 100% with every word in the book, but it's a REALLY, REALLY good book.
Jessica Griffith
Mar 26, 2013 rated it it was amazing
The antidote to all this business about gratitude and happiness in current spiritual writing. I should have raided my husband's bookshelf a long time ago.
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189827
Johann Baptist Metz is a Catholic theologian. He is Ordinary Professor of Fundamental Theology, Emeritus, at Westphalian Wilhelms University in Münster, Germany.

A student of Karl Rahner, he broke with Rahner's transcendental theology in a turn to a theology rooted in praxis. Metz is at the center of a school of political theology that strongly influenced Liberation Theology. He is one of the most
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“We must learn to accept ourselves in the painful experiment of living. We must embrace the spiritual adventure of becoming human, moving through the many stages that lie between birth and death.” 3 likes
“There is a poverty of the average human’s life, who is unnoticed by the world. It is the poverty of the commonplace. There is nothing heroic about it; it is the poverty of the common lot, devoid of ecstasy. Jesus was poor in this way. He was no model figure for humanists, no great artist or statesman, no diffident genius. He was a frighteningly simple man, whose only talent was to do good. The one great passion in his life was “the Father.” Yet it was precisely in this way that he demonstrated “the wonder of empty hands” (Bernanos), the great potential of the person on the street, whose radical dependence on God is no different from anyone else’s. He has no talent but that of his own heart, no contribution to make except self-abandonment, no consolation save God alone.” 1 likes
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