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Alexander Schmorell: Saint of the German Resistance

4.63  ·  Rating details ·  19 ratings  ·  8 reviews
At the height of World War II, a small band of students in Munich, Germany, formed a clandestine organization called the White Rose, which exposed the Nazi regime’s murderous atrocities and called for its overthrow. In its first anti-Nazi tract, the group wrote, “...Nothing is so unworthy of a civilized nation as allowing itself to be ‘governed’ without opposition by an ...more
Paperback, 232 pages
Published March 1st 2017 by The Printshop of St Job of Pochaev
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Steve Walker
Required reading for the current era.
Emmie
What an amazing, inspiring read. Profound and moving. The tragic story of young people standing up against opression and standing steadfast, true to their beliefs no matter the opposition or threat of death. It tells the story of the White Rose movement, but especially of Alxander Schmorrel. He truly is an inspiration.

I have ordered a copy for my own bookshelf.

Thank you Netgalley and the publishers for allowing me to read and review this book.
Marc Pearce
Jun 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Truly a captivating read. A book that is hard to put down. A great narrative concerning not only an "everyday" person's path to sainthood, but also of the larger "White Rose" group with which he played a major role. Many profound lessons are shared with the reader within its pages. Recommend reading!
Dcn Peter Markevich
Feb 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
*Full Disclosure: I work for the publisher of this book*

This is without doubt the most fascinating, gripping book I've read in the last year. The story of Alexander Schmorell and his compatriots in the White Rose resistance group is told in a way that is sure to inspire every reader. Sure, the "action" and chronology is exciting, but more important still is the account of St Alexander and the White Rose's philosophical and explicitly Christian objections to the path down which the Nazi regime
...more
Ryan Laferney
Nov 26, 2018 rated it really liked it
A great little gem concerning not only an "everyday" person's path to sainthood (St. Alexander Schmorell), but also of the larger "White Rose" group with which he played a major role. Recounted for the first time in English, this book is an inspiration for those who face anti-Christian ideaology and debased humanity around the globe.

The Holy Martyr Alexander Schmorell (now also St. Alexander of Munich) was a medical student during World War II and one of the founding members of the anti-Nazi
...more
Michele Minor
Oct 10, 2019 rated it really liked it
Shelves: first-reads
This book is about one of the lesser known saints and martyrs of the Russian Orthodox Church who was a part of the German Resistance during World War II who worked against the Nazi Regime. We get to know about his life and how he came to be a martyr as well as a saint. Alexander Schmorell was a part of the White Rose movement that opposed the Nazi regime and were persecuted for their convictions and action. This gives us another look at Germans during World War II, not all of them were Nazis or ...more
Jennifer
Apr 30, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A member of the White Rose resistance movement, Alexander Schmorell followed and died for his convictions. This book shares details about his childhood, education and actions, and it describes how prison strengthened his faith. While the book read like a textbook, I appreciated its insights and the notes and resources shared at the end. Through this book, I have gained a greater appreciation for this saint and inspiration to follow my convictions no matter what the cost.
Diane Xenia
Jan 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing
A book for our time!
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Elena Perekrestov holds an MA from the Russian School of Norwich University. A lifelong educator, she teaches at Saints Cyrill and Methodius High School (San Francisco, CA) and the Summer School of Liturgical Music at Holy Trinity Seminary (Jordanville, NY).
“St Alexander, his friends, and mentors opposed National Socialism primarily from the standpoint of their Christian faith. They perceived Nazi ideology as an assault on Truth. In the ambition of the Nazi creed to destroy the existing order of society, in its fierce determination to annihilate Jews, Slavs, Gypsies, and all whom it deemed unworthy of existence, the White Rose saw an assault on the very concept of Man who was created in God’s image. It was an assault on God himself. The authors of the White Rose leaflets, Alexander and Hans, ascribe a spiritual significance to their resistance to Nazism, which they call “the dictatorship of evil.”255 In their fourth leaflet, they present this resistance as a struggle against “the National Socialist terrorist state … the struggle against the devil, against the servants of Antichrist.” It is of utmost importance, they continue, to realize that everywhere and at all times, demons have been lurking in the dark, waiting for the moment when man is weak; when of his own volition he leaves his place in the order of Creation as founded for him by God in freedom; when he yields to the force of evil, separates himself from the powers of a higher order and, after voluntarily taking the first step, is driven on to the next and the next at a furiously accelerating pace. One must therefore cling to God, as “of course man is free, but without God he is defenseless against evil. He is like a rudderless ship, at the mercy of the storm, an infant without his mother, a cloud dissolving into thin air.” The accuracy of the young people’s perception of the fundamental antagonism of National Socialism to Christianity was corroborated by the Nazis themselves (although, like the Communists in Russia, they made efforts to disguise and deny this). In a secret circular of June 9, 1941, Martin Bormann, Hitler’s second in command, divulged the fact that the repressive measures against the Churches of Germany were aimed against Christianity itself. The circular opened with the following words: “National Socialism and Christianity are irreconcilable.”256 In a private conversation, the head of the dreaded SS, Heinrich Himmler, boasted that “We shall not rest until we have rooted out Christianity.” 1 likes
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