Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Communion and Otherness: Further Studies in Personhood and the Church” as Want to Read:
Communion and Otherness: Further Studies in Personhood and the Church
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Communion and Otherness: Further Studies in Personhood and the Church

4.47  ·  Rating details ·  49 Ratings  ·  3 Reviews
‘Communion and otherness: how can these be reconciled?' In this wide-ranging study, the distinguished Orthodox theologian, Metropolitan John (Zizioulas) of Pergamon, seeks to answer that question. In his celebrated book, Being as Communion (1985), he emphasised the importance of communion for life and for unity. In this important companion volume he now explores the comple ...more
Paperback, 330 pages
Published January 1st 2007 by Bloomsbury T&T Clark (first published November 1st 2006)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Communion and Otherness, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Communion and Otherness

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Matthew Palombo
Mar 24, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Zizioulas is one of the best contributors over the last 30 years on the doctrine of the Trinity from an Orthodox perspective. This book is very much another contribution. His focus on the community of the three Persons and the community of the church is very interesting; also his distinction between otherness and difference is essential for what it means to be a person. I do disagree with Zizioulas on two important points. First, I do not share his emphasis on the hierarchy of the Father in rela ...more
G Walker
A great follow up to his _being as communion_. Not easy reading, but he shows the relevance of the (Cappadocean) fathers, even now after all of our "theological development and evolution in thought". Page after page of sheer brilliance... Parts of it though were too dense and hard to follow which required substantial rereading and reflection... Still the vast majority of the book is understandable and as such nourishing.
As good as it was, the publisher's excessive hubris is displayed is its ridi
...more
Adam Lorenz
rated it really liked it
Jul 11, 2014
Jesse
rated it liked it
Jul 01, 2012
Kory
rated it it was amazing
Oct 22, 2012
John Foley
rated it it was amazing
Mar 10, 2011
Vijay Pillai
rated it it was amazing
Jul 04, 2015
Phi
rated it it was amazing
Mar 28, 2014
m j everitt
rated it it was amazing
Aug 28, 2017
Sally
rated it it was amazing
Jul 06, 2015
Jonathan
rated it it was amazing
May 26, 2012
Stephen Rugg
rated it really liked it
Dec 02, 2016
Jason Postma
rated it really liked it
Dec 11, 2014
Andrey
rated it it was amazing
Jul 16, 2015
Steven Boman
rated it it was amazing
Sep 28, 2011
Joel Watson
rated it it was amazing
Dec 14, 2014
Sarah
rated it it was amazing
Jun 19, 2016
Dan Lunney
rated it really liked it
Dec 01, 2016
Deacon
rated it it was amazing
Dec 11, 2008
Teo
rated it really liked it
Dec 07, 2017
Lydia Corriveau
Aug 20, 2017 marked it as to-read
Julie Canlis mentions this book when talking about the Trinity in "The Relational Self: Trinitarian Insights on what it means to be human"
Jeremy
rated it it was amazing
Mar 07, 2010
Pishowi
rated it really liked it
Aug 22, 2012
John
rated it liked it
May 31, 2011
Jannie Swart
rated it it was amazing
Feb 03, 2009
Paul
rated it liked it
Aug 14, 2017
John
rated it it was amazing
Jul 16, 2013
John
rated it it was amazing
Aug 09, 2012
Arvin Gouw
rated it it was amazing
Jan 20, 2016
Michael
rated it really liked it
Jul 26, 2011
« previous 1 next »
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
336745
His Eminence, the Most Reverend John (Zizioulas) of Pergamon (b. 1931) is a modern theologian and titular Metropolitan of Pergamon, under the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople. The future metropolitan was born January 10, 1931. He began his studies at the University of Thessaloniki but took his first theology degree from the University of Athens in 1955. He studied patristics under Father ...more
More about John D. Zizioulas...
“In the Eucharist we can find all the dimensions of communion: God communicates himself to us, we enter into communion with him, the participants of the sacrament enter into communion with one another, and creation as a whole enters through man into communion with God. All this takes place in Christ and the Spirit, who brings the last days into history and offers to the world a foretaste of the Kingdom.” 3 likes
“I have maintained that precisely because Christian faith regards the nothing from which the world came forth as absolute ‘non-being, creatureliness implies that death is a return to the nothingness of nonbeing…
Problems essentially derive either from a belief, latent in many Christians, in the immortality of the soul, whereby death no longer constitutes a return to non-being since the soul, of it’s nature, lives eternally, or from a belief that God does not create mortal beings, and consequently that what is created cannot but live. With regard to the first belief, namely in the immorality of the soul, I have said enough above about the soul not being immortal by nature, since it is not eternal but created. Consequently, it too is subject to the destiny of creation if left to itself. We can certainly speak of an immortality of the soul that is not ‘natural’ by ‘by grace’, but this is possible only by means of a logical contradiction. The fact that the soul can be immortal *by grace* does not logically permit us to say that it *is* immortal, since the fact that is is created means that it is not immortal in its nature. In fact, it we accept that the soul can be immortal by grace, we implicitly accept that it is not so by nature. Indeed, immortality by grace is conceivable, as we shall, but why limit it to the soul? Immortality by grace, when and where it prevails, concerns the body and the material world in general just as much as the soul. To speak of immortality only with regard to the soul – and only for the soul – even by grace, is a distraction: it involved specially attributing to the soul qualities of immortality. But God does not want only souls to be saved – he wants also the salvation and survival of bodies and of the world as a whole.”
2 likes
More quotes…