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Kierkegaard's Muse: The Mystery of Regine Olsen

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  13 ratings  ·  2 reviews
The first biography of Kierkegaard's literary muse and one-time fianc�(c)e, from the author of the definitive biography of the philosopher

Kierkegaard's Muse, the first biography of Regine Olsen (1822� "1904), the literary inspiration and one-time fianc�(c)e of Danish philosopher S�, ren Kierkegaard, is a moving portrait of a long romantic fever that had momentous literary
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Hardcover, 336 pages
Published June 20th 2017 by Princeton University Press
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really liked it 4.00  · 
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 ·  13 ratings  ·  2 reviews


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Ben
Oct 05, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
(Too?) much to my liking.
Jim Kuhlman
Aug 09, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: philosophy
I'm not that advanced a student of Kierkegaard, but found this to be extraordinarily enlightening concerning his psychology. Regine was a remarkable woman very much touched by Kierkegaard's unusual mind and spirit. Fascinating. Somewhat haunting.
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“As we read through this small pile of correspondence, a curious duplicity gradually emerges. In their language, the letters are among Kierkegaard’s most outstanding achievements so far as a writer. The pen no longer pauses with the ink bleeding onto the paper; the creaky Latin syntax that once could force Kierkegaard’s language into lackluster constructions is here replaced by a beguiling suppleness that lifts the lines from the page. They steal gently around their subject and draw on well-known Danish writers, such as Johannes Ewald, Jens Baggesen, Adam Oehlenschläger, Christian Winter, and Poul Martin Møller. Far from being ordinary communication, these letters are art.
Therein lies the triumph and the tragedy. For the letters, by virtue of their undeniably aesthetic quality, almost cry out to the writer that a husband is not at all what he is to become, but an author. This makes them in effect letters of “farewell that try, with great discretion and an ingenious indirectness, to make the recipient understand that the man who celebrates her up and down the page has long ago vanished from her life because he has lost himself in recollection of her. His love is bound in artifice and imagination, and he has to accept the truth of the situation, that he is in real life unsuited to the married state. From the recollection that gives life to imagination there spreads also the death that parts the lovers.”
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