Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality and Dependency” as Want to Read:
Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality and Dependency
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality and Dependency (Thinking Gender)

4.33  ·  Rating details ·  30 Ratings  ·  2 Reviews
First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Paperback, 256 pages
Published December 17th 1998 by Routledge
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Love's Labor, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Love's Labor

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-30)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Taylor
Essential philosophical feminist work that is dense (as expected) but brings to light quite a few good points.

Marked as "not finished" because did not read intros/preface and stopped after chapter 3.
mwr
One of the clearest statements of care ethics in a field that has (understandably) a lot of vagueness.
Nathan
rated it really liked it
Jun 17, 2011
Sandra
rated it it was amazing
Apr 01, 2012
J
rated it it was amazing
Oct 26, 2015
Kuria
rated it it was amazing
Mar 05, 2017
Meghan Peterson
rated it really liked it
Jun 15, 2015
Michelle Casado
rated it really liked it
Feb 28, 2017
Stephen
rated it really liked it
Jul 12, 2012
Davidnathan
rated it really liked it
Apr 01, 2011
Aubrey
rated it liked it
Jun 02, 2012
Shelley
rated it it was amazing
Oct 25, 2016
Mnrupe
rated it liked it
May 27, 2012
Raymond
rated it it was amazing
Jan 26, 2013
Anna
rated it it was amazing
Sep 19, 2014
Dawn
rated it really liked it
Jun 14, 2014
Benjamin Reiss
rated it really liked it
Aug 25, 2015
Swan
rated it it was amazing
Nov 19, 2016
Samantha Doty
rated it it was amazing
Aug 24, 2016
Liz
rated it it was amazing
May 12, 2010
Shawn
rated it really liked it
Dec 08, 2007
Dafna
rated it really liked it
Mar 11, 2016
Emma Caylor
rated it really liked it
Apr 10, 2018
Chronolith
rated it really liked it
Apr 10, 2008
Jeoffrey
rated it really liked it
Nov 13, 2013
Gloria
rated it it was amazing
May 24, 2014
Simone Sampson
rated it really liked it
Jan 02, 2014
Nicholas Hudson
rated it it was amazing
Jan 07, 2013
Bridget
rated it it was amazing
Mar 08, 2017
Natasha
rated it it was amazing
Jun 08, 2016
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
Eva Feder Kittay is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Stony Brook University/SUNY; a Senior Fellow of the Stony Brook Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care and Bioethics, and an Affiliate of the Women's Studies Program. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEH Fellowship, and the APA and Phi Beta Kappa Lebowitz Prize. She has also been recognized for her work in F ...more
More about Eva Feder Kittay

Other Books in the Series

Thinking Gender (1 - 10 of 26 books)
  • The Impossibility of Motherhood: Feminism, Individualism and the Problem of Mothering
  • Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics
  • Men Doing Feminism
  • Emotional Rescue: The Theory and Practice of a Feminist Father
  • Dislocating Cultures: Identities, Traditions, and Third World Feminism
  • Playing with Fire: Queer Politics, Queer Theories
  • Race/Sex: Their Sameness, Difference and Interplay
  • Feminism and Families
  • From Sex Objects to Sexual Subjects
  • Feminist Genealogies, Colonial Legacies, Democratic Futures
“The disparity, however, between the rewards offered in the labor market and the vital interest to have good dependency care makes it clear that market forces have not been relied upon to supply adequate dependency work. Indeed, a clear-eyed look at the nearly universal twin features of female caregiving and female subordination indicates: 1) that a certain class of persons has been subjected to and socialized to develop the character traits and the volitional structure needed for dependency work; 2) that certain sexual behaviors commensurate with forming attachments, being submissive to another's will, and so forth have been made compulsory for women; and 3) that poor women and women of color have been forced into paid employment as dependency workers by the scanty financial resources and limited employment opportunities available to them, and middle-class women have been forced out of paid employment not commensurate with their (largely unpaid) duties as dependency workers. It has not merely “happened” that women have consistently “chosen” to make dependency relations and dependency work central to their vision of the good life, while men have chosen a wider variety of options.” 0 likes
“I began to see that while equality often entailed women crossing the sexual divide between women's work and men's work, equality rarely meant that men crossed over the divide to the women's side: our side – women's – the side where work was largely, though not exclusively, unpaid or poorly paid care of dependents.” 0 likes
More quotes…