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Fairy Floss: The Sweet Story of Cotton Candy
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Fairy Floss: The Sweet Story of Cotton Candy

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3.29  ·  Rating details ·  83 ratings  ·  21 reviews
Step right up and read about the debut of cotton candy at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904!

The 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, was an exhibition like none other. It had huge buildings for displaying all sorts of inventions and machines, exhibits from all around the world, and vendors selling new foods, including something called Fairy Floss, which we now call c
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Hardcover, 40 pages
Published May 30th 2017 by little bee books
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Average rating 3.29  · 
Rating details
 ·  83 ratings  ·  21 reviews


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Calista
My niece read this book on her own and she loved it so much that she told me I had to read it so I did. She loves this book. She said “It’s old timey and has to do with fairy floss and cotton candy. It’s the best book.” So, I told her I would read it.

I love the old feel to the art. It reminds me of cartoons of the turn of the century Disney might have done. It is bright and happy. It tells the story of John Wharton and William Morrison, a dentist, who came up with a way to make cotton candy. It
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Michele Knott
Interesting story about the origins of the candy, but with the amount of invented dialogue hard to classify it as nonfiction. Have to teach young readers how to look for the facts through the narrative.
Mary
Jun 09, 2017 rated it liked it
This book includes some history of the World's Fair in St Louis as well as the history of Cotton Candy. It feels very fanciful with its colors and phrasing, like an idealized version of times gone by.
Amy Lafleur Meyers
Fun book about the early history of cotton candy, or fairy floss, as it was known. Bright colorful painted illustrations and text show and tell the story of how John Wharton, a candymaker, and his friend, William Morrison who invented an electric candy machine that makes fairy floss. Ingalls shows how an electric motor spun and heated sugar to turn it into cotton candy. Wharton and Morrison showed off their invention at the St. Louis World's Fair. In those illustrations, you can see other invent ...more
Becky B
Feb 06, 2018 rated it really liked it
The story of the world's first electric cotton candy machine and it's unveiling at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904 told through the point of view of a fictional little girl visiting the fair with her aunt.

A historical fiction picture book that educates about the development and process of making cotton candy. There's a page in the back with some further historical information. The illustrations are bright and colorful and should attract little readers. Read this before visiting a fair, or rea
...more
Laura
Jul 19, 2017 rated it liked it
I think this reads more as a nonfiction narrative about the invention of cotton candy rather than a STEM story. There's little that makes this STEM in my mind -- the invention process isn't describe, there's no trial and error to show the invention process, and the mechanics of the machine are only briefly described. While it's an interesting story, the thin details and lack of information make this a less than ideal book. The illustrations are engaging and the storyline is fairly straightforwar ...more
Sue
May 28, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Fascinating story of cotton candy and a young girl's trip to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair lets children put themselves in a different world, when the Palace of Electricity showcased wonders such as toasters and electric cotton candy making machines! STEM and history are a sweet match in this lovely book with enchanting illustrations. Bookmarking this one especially for library and school use.
H
Mar 10, 2018 rated it liked it
The 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis introduced the world to Dr Pepper, the ice cream cone and Fairy Floss. This spun sugar confection is more widely known in the USA as cotton candy and here is its origin story. Told in boldly colored illustrations and from a young girl's point of view, it is a book that is as fluffy as the treat it is about.
Sarah
"Meet me in St. Louis, Louis, meet me at the fair!" A young girl going to the World's Fair in St. Louis must see the inventors of cotton candy, and taste this delicious new invention! Nonfiction information in the back of the book.
Precious
Jun 19, 2017 rated it really liked it
Cool. Mind was blown when it said that they sold 68,655 books at the St. Louis world's Fair!
Mic
Jul 21, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: pbs
THE ART IS TO DIE FOR
Jocelin
Jul 03, 2017 rated it really liked it
Shelves: children-s-books
Interesting story of how we got cotton candy.
Emily
Oct 26, 2017 rated it really liked it
Good read about inventions, could be more detailed. K-2
Kirsten Murphy
Includes facts about how cotton candy was invented and sold at 1904 World’s Fair
Logan Phillips
Jun 11, 2019 rated it really liked it
I liked reading this picture book, as it told the history of how the modern cotton candy machine was made in a fun and enjoyable story. I thought it would be fun to find a traditional cotton candy machine and make some in class as a reward/ party day. It also talks about world fairs which is something I feel could make a fun project for older grades. I thought it would be fun to have students read about an invention that was showcased during a world fair and give a presentation on the invention ...more
Donna Mork
Mar 05, 2020 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: historic
Very cute book about cotton candy's invention (aka fairy floss) set at the Worlds Fair. Lots of historic information given in a cute, fun children's book. Nice illustrations.
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