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What Goes Up

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What goes up . . . comes down on Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow's roof! Will a rogue NASA satellite crush her house before Robyn can set things right?

Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow (yes, that's actually her name) has a target on her roof. Well, not a real one, but everything seems to land there: paper airplanes, lost kites, socks, cats, and once even a skydiver! In the town of Calliope, Robyn and her magnet roof are famous--for being weird. That wasn't such a big deal . . . until now!

A rogue NASA satellite is falling out of orbit and is going to hit Earth. NASA says it will probably land in the ocean, but Robyn knows better--that satellite is headed for her roof. To make matters worse, Robyn discovers that she doesn't just have a fairy middle name. When her class reads A Midsummer Night's Dream, she learns that Robin Goodfellow is a fairy! Which means if the satellite flattens her, everyone will laugh at her name in the news stories. Robyn realizes what she needs to do: find her long-lost dad so he can help her change her name and protect her from the satellite!

Both surprising and relatable, this middle-grade novel will have readers wishing they could move to the small town of Calliope, laugh with the larger-than-life characters, and race against the clock to save Robyn from NASA's mistake.

224 pages, ebook

First published October 30, 2018

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About the author

Wen Baragrey

1 book3 followers
Wen Baragrey is a New Zealand earthquake survivor who recently turned tail and ran to the other end of the country to live on a farm, only to find herself surrounded by volcanos, cantankerous livestock, and giant slugs. Don't even get her started on the goats.

To keep her mind off it, she writes books for middle graders, an age group she's never fully outgrown. It still comes as a complete surprise when someone expects her to make an adult decision or sign a check, and she hopes that never changes.

As well as writing, Wen has worked most of her life as an artist, the only other profession where it doesn’t matter if you forget to brush your hair. For fun, she plays guitar and sings, not well, but with a great deal of enthusiasm.

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Displaying 1 - 30 of 38 reviews
Profile Image for Christopher.
226 reviews190 followers
June 27, 2019
Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow’s roof is magnetic. Well, not literally, but an awful lots of stuff ends up there. Most days, it seems like half the town of Calliope loses something on her roof— kites, cats, bed sheets … a sky diver. Normally it’s just a mild annoyance, but then NASA reports that one of their satellites is about to fall out of orbit and Robyn can’t help but worry that it’s headed straight for her home. As if a sixth grader who just discovered she’s named after a fairy from a Shakespeare play and who’s attempting to locate her father doesn’t have enough to deal with!

In middle grade novels, there’s often a discussion of ‘middle grade voice’. It’s hard to define— either a book has it or it doesn’t, and you’ll know it when you read it. Robyn, through the remarkable work of author Wen Jane Baragrey, has got it in spades.

From the first page, there’s breakneck action. A skydiver has landed on the roof and Robyn, rather than panicking, accepts the absurd normalcy of the situation. The action stays at this level of excitement as she navigates life with a mother who hosts fairy parties for toddlers out of her home, a grandmother who feuds constantly with their CIA-obsessed neighbor, and a best friend, Nickel, who forms the other half of their club, Focus Pocus. The narrative bounces from plot to plot with a high level of excitement and camp. A lesser writer might get scattered trying to gather so many busy, fun sections together, but Baragrey expertly keeps the story focused.

But beyond the zaniness, of which there is plenty, there’s a deep sense of heart that grounds this story. Robyn struggles with not knowing anything about her father. She’s albino and, though she feels deeply linked to her white presenting mother and grandmother, she also feels like an outsider. When she discovers a family in a neighboring town with albino children, she wonders if her father might be related and hatches several complicated plans to connect with them. This powerful yearning to understand and belong is effective and shines even more when juxtaposed against some of the quirky scenes that surround these feelings.

Ultimately, this creates a beautiful throughline. Whether Robyn is struggling through Shakespeare or dealing with screaming kids at her mother’s party business, she’s simply a girl trying to find out how she belongs … while avoiding an impending satellite disaster.

Books do not get much better than this absolutely charming story about family, friends, and a possibly magnetic roof.
Profile Image for Samantha (WLABB).
3,543 reviews234 followers
November 5, 2018
Rating: 4.5 Stars

Robyn lived in a house, which she claimed had a "magnetic roof". For some reason, projectiles had a tendency to take up residence on her rooftop. Therefore, when she learned of the NASA satellite's return to Earth, she was worried it would also be attracted to her roof and most likely destroy her home. This news, along with seeing a local family filled with people who looked like her, who also had albinism, spurred Robyn to search for the father she never knew.

Robyn was such a fabulous character. It was instalove for me. I loved her voice, and the way she navigated her emotions, as well as the feelings of others. There were a few times, where she put her own interests before other people's, but she would back up, recognize it, and correct herself. I liked seeing that in an almost-12-year-old. Robyn was also determined and tenacious, and I loved her go-get-em attitude. Her need to know more about her father was never more clear, than when Robyn compared how she looked like she doesn't belong in her family, and how "other" she always felt. I know I wanted her to get some answers, because I grew to adore and care for her very much.

Robyn was really lucky to have an awesome best friend (future-husband) named Nickel. Yes, his whole family was named after coins, but that didn't hamper him from supporting Robyn when she needed him most. There were actually a few really, really heartwarming moments shared between the two. One was this heart-to-heart he had with Robyn in the later part of the book, that made me shed some really happy tears, because it was such a precious exchange, and clearly illustrated how much her friendship meant to him.

Not only did Baragrey gift Robyn with Nickel in her life, she packed the town with some fun and eccentric characters. Robyn's mom was obsessed with faeries, and even managed to make a career of it, while her grandmother carried on a friendly-ish feud with the nosy and delusional neighbor. Many other interesting denizens rounded out the cast, and it was a pleasure getting to meet them all.

Overall: A touching and heartwarming story about family, friendship, and belonging, which will make you laugh, cheer, and smile.

*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review.

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Profile Image for Tabitha Bird.
Author 2 books171 followers
November 15, 2018
Loved this book! I am so blessed to know this author personally, and during a stay with her this year in New Zealand I was lucky enough to read the as yet unpublished version of this book. It is BRILLIANT! Funny, heart warming. Giggle-out-loud kind of good stuff. And I am so excited to buy a copy when it hits the shelves in 2017. I can't wait until its release date!

UPDATE:

So it's the 15th of November 2018 and my dear friend, Wen Baragrey, is finally holding her book in her hands. Today I finished re-reading the book, this time the real life, hard cover version, which was a special treat indeed. It's not often you get to stand next to a book where you have had to privilege of watching the author grow, of writing along side them and of celebrating moments big and small. It's not often you get to be THIS proud. And I am. I am truly proud of both Wen and her book.

WHAT GOES UP is a funny, quirky little book, but it's so much more. Behind the over-active imagination of 11 yr old Robyn Goodfellow is the heart of a girl grieving the father she doesn't know. Her adventures to find this man lead to her discovering beautiful things about found-families as well as those imperfect, but wonderful people who are related to us. I love Robyn, her fairy mother the host of characters romping through her world. A wonderful read. Now to re-read this book to my children. First time was mine to savour alone. Now I get to enjoy it all over again with them.
19 reviews3 followers
October 30, 2018
I'm always looking for funny books my kids will love that aren't part of a series of 12 nearly identical books focusing on potty humor. THIS IS IT.

Charming, sincere, and oh so quirky. I loved Robyn and found her struggle to find her father coupled with her seemingly irrational fear of being hit by a rogue satellite oddly relatable for every kid. I loved the cast of eccentric characters--especially Robyn's best friend Nickel (whose siblings are Dime and Penny), Robyn's fairy obsessed mother who is constantly trying to add a little magic to everyday life, and Robyn's hilarious grandmother--constantly at war with their crazy neighbor. And I really loved that along with all the silly characters and situations WHAT GOES UP also managed to have a lot of substance. Themes of love, loss, family and friendship run throughout.
Profile Image for Laurie.
865 reviews
October 27, 2018
Interest Level: 3-6; Reading Level: 4.2

Imagine that your house is a magnet for everything to fall on - toys, kites, Frisbees, even people. Now imagine that a NASA satellite is falling out of the sky and Robyn knows that it will fall on her house. She knows death is coming and she doesn't want her name, Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow, to be made fun of in the papers. Robyn knows that she must find the father that she has never met in order to get him to change her name legally. She knows her mom will never agree to it so she makes it her mission to find him before the satellite hits. Thank goodness for her best friend, Nickel, who helps her on all of her adventures. Not only is Nickel her best friend, Robyn knows that they will grow up and be married one day, even if Nickel doesn't realize it yet. In the meantime, will Robyn be able to find her father before the satellite crashes down on her house? Will Robyn's obsession to find her father destroy her friendship with Nickel? Will NASA be able to stop the satellite before it lands on Robyn's house? Read this incredible story to find out.

This is probably one of may favorite stories that I've read. Robyn is such a lovable character that draws you into her life and makes you empathize with her struggles to want to find and get to know her dad. As a reader, you will also begin to believe and fear that the satellite really will hit her house. I also love the friendship between Robyn and Nickel. It makes you realize that there is nothing more important than having someone to stick by your side through thick and thin. This book is incredible and a must read for 2018!

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Profile Image for Laurie.
865 reviews
October 27, 2018
Interest Level: 3-6; Reading Level: 4.2

Imagine that your house is a magnet for everything to fall on - toys, kites, Frisbees, even people. Now imagine that a NASA satellite is falling out of the sky and Robyn knows that it will fall on her house. She knows death is coming and she doesn't want her name, Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow, to be made fun of in the papers. Robyn knows that she must find the father that she has never met in order to get him to change her name legally. She knows her mom will never agree to it so she makes it her mission to find him before the satellite hits. Thank goodness for her best friend, Nickel, who helps her on all of her adventures. Not only is Nickel her best friend, Robyn knows that they will grow up and be married one day, even if Nickel doesn't realize it yet. In the meantime, will Robyn be able to find her father before the satellite crashes down on her house? Will Robyn's obsession to find her father destroy her friendship with Nickel? Will NASA be able to stop the satellite before it lands on Robyn's house? Read this incredible story to find out.

This is probably one of may favorite stories that I've read. Robyn is such a lovable character that draws you into her life and makes you empathize with her struggles to want to find and get to know her dad. As a reader, you will also begin to believe and fear that the satellite really will hit her house. I also love the friendship between Robyn and Nickel. It makes you realize that there is nothing more important than having someone to stick by your side through thick and thin. This book is incredible and a must read for 2018!
Profile Image for Laura.
2,765 reviews82 followers
September 7, 2018
Like the author, when I heard about the satellite that was threatening to fall on Robyn's house, I thought of Skylab that was supposed to fall somewhere in Australia in the late 1970s. It is an interesting fear, but when you hear that something like that can fall out of the sky, and in Robyn's case, everything that falls out of the sky lands on her house, it is a valid fear.

But, that is not the only thing that is going on in this story.. Robyn is also thinking, in her fear of being struck by space junk, that she would like to meet her father before she is a goner, so she starts searching for him.

Interesting story. Very real characters. A bit scattered, but real. Mother is eccentric, to say the least, but that adds to the oddness of the house. It did feel as though there was a lot going on for a middle-school book, that there could have been more about how Robyn had wondered about who her father was before she worried about her eminent demise.

Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.
Profile Image for Patricia J. O'Brien.
517 reviews13 followers
October 30, 2018
I met Wen Baragrey online about ten years ago, sharing writing and dreams and life struggles. What has always stood out for me is her wonderful sense of humor, love of family, and talent for storytelling. Her debut novel, WHAT GOES UP, incorporates all that.

Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow has a number of difficulties in her young life, starting with her name and her mother’s vocation of hosting fairy parties in their home.

But Robyn’s biggest concern at the moment is a space satellite is falling to earth. Her house has always been a magnet for falling objects like kites, balls, trees, and even a skydiver. She’s sure the satellite will be drawn to them and she will never meet her mysterious father.

The story is filled with marvelous characters and has an ending that brought tears to my eyes.

Published by Random House Children’s Books it is available now. I highly recommend it as a holiday gift for middle grade readers in your life (and even for yourself).

Profile Image for Robert Jones.
69 reviews3 followers
October 31, 2018
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the NetGalley book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Frisbee, boomerang, rocket, bedsheets, it's probably on top of the Goodfellow's house. So when a rogue satellite plans to crash back down to earth, it's only natural Robyn believes its heading straight for their house.

But there is more to this story, than meets the eye. With a father she has never known and a satellite threatening to flatten her house, time is running out. I would recommend this story to most ages 11 & older.

17 reviews
January 7, 2019
Oh I loved this book so much! I don't usually read 'children's fiction', usually settling for YA instead, but I was after some lighter reading for during my uni exams and I'm so glad I found this book. Robyn was such a well written reminder of what it was like to be an 11 year old who was considered different, something I think my inner 11 year old found quite comforting, and I would love to live in Calliope with all it's wonderfully quirky residents. The ending was surprisingly bittersweet and a moved tear was shed, the perfect way of tying together all the strings and finishing Robyn's story.
3 reviews
October 31, 2018
I loved this book. It was awesome. It's one of my new favorite books. It was super funny. I loved the characters. I especially loved the feud between Robyn's grandma and their neighbor. I liked that she was worried that she would die because her name would be in the paper and everyone would laugh at it. Overall I thought this was a great book. I suggest it to anyone because this book is pretty much good for anyone who likes funny things.
1 review
November 1, 2018
This book is amazing! I fell in love with Robyn within the first few chapters. This book is so funny! It is the perfect book for everyone regardless if you like reading or not. Robyn's magnet roof and quirky personality were the best. I love this book so much!
Profile Image for Kerryn.
29 reviews2 followers
March 16, 2019
I loved this book!! Robyn’s quirkiness and giant heart had me both laughing and crying. Loaded with wit, fairies and satellites it makes for a great read. I thought the author finished it just beautifully. Highly recommended!
Profile Image for Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*.
6,001 reviews193 followers
January 12, 2020
What Goes Up by Wen Jane Baragrey, 213 pages. Random House, 2019. $17

Content: G

BUYING ADVISORY: EL - OPTIONAL

AUDIENCE APPEAL: LOW

Robyn, 11, has a pretty nice life in her small town with her loving Grandma and her mother who has created a fairy wonderland in their front room for her party business. Except for a very nosy neighbor and the fact that everything seems to land on their roof – and that includes skydivers – life would be great. When Robyn hears about a NASA satellite that has broken orbit and is heading towards Earth, she just knows that it will head straight towards her house. She thinks if she can find her father that everything will be all right. Since she was born with albinism, she thinks she has found him in a town close-by. She’ll need the help of her best friend Nickel to find her answers.

Baragrey adds many small details which I think are supposed to be charming and quirky, but for me were confusing and overkill. I had to reread parts of the book to write the review because of the confusion. If you want quirky girl, try Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling.

Cindy, Library Teacher, MLS
https://kissthebookjr.blogspot.com/20...
Profile Image for Pop Bop.
2,474 reviews103 followers
September 29, 2020
A Remarkably Likable Heroine Carries, (Saves?), This Book

Our heroine, twelve year old Robyn, is a gimlet eyed softy whose deadpan narration is funny, perceptive, charming, and sometimes heartbreaking. Her boy friend, Nickel, is a patient and occasionally confused good guy who keeps Robin grounded. The two of them make for a fine buddy act, although Robyn is the star of the show. And that's essential, because the book has two aspects that would sink it without Robyn and Nickel keeping it all afloat.

First, the gimmick here is that Robin's house's roof "attracts" falling objects. Balls, kites, tree limbs, wayward parachutists. Now, a crippled satellite is falling to Earth and Robin is obsessed with the likelihood that it will crash onto her house. Lots of middle grade books feature characters who are obsessed about something odd or unlikely or unrealistic, and I suppose this is no more of a stretch than other such plot movers, but it does take a high degree of willingness on the part of the reader to go along with it. Again, it is Robyn's charm and commitment to the idea that makes it work as well as it does.

The second odd angle, though, requires even more of a suspension of belief. Robyn lives with her Mom and Grandmother. Dad is gone and has never been present. Robyn doesn't know who he was, where he went, or where he is. The second theme, or plotline, of the book, turns on Robyn's surreptitious attempts to locate her Dad. Mom knows the full history. Grandma knows the full history. The neighbors know the full history. It's a small town. But Robyn knows exactly zero about anything. Robyn is twelve years old and has never learned a single thing about her Dad, ever? From anyone? NO SPOILERS, but the final resolution makes the whole situation even more unbelievable and annoying when you finally do get the answer. I didn't like it and I didn't buy it.

To be fair, this is a book for early middle graders. The magnetic roof bit is odd, but certainly O.K. as a goofy sort of hook and no worse than other odd obsessions that power characters in other fine middle grade books. Along the same lines, lots of similar books deal with questions about an absent parent, and at least this one doesn't try to be a realistic look at PTSD or mental illness or anything else that deals in a serious vein with missing parents who we don't talk about. A younger read might very well take that whole angle in stride.

So, what kept me going was Robyn, simply as a marvelously well written character. Some of her observations and one-liners are brilliant. Just treat everything that happens plotwise as a fantastical or magically realistic excuse to hang out with Robyn and Nickel and you'll be fine.

(Please note that I received a free ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
570 reviews6 followers
September 3, 2019
Disappointing that the first positive representation (positive as in: not the antagonist, which is a first) of albino people is written by someone who is not albino. I have family members who are albino and this was pretty meh in terms of accurate rep. I cannot speak definitively since I am not albino, but it seems like a clear case of a writer using a marginalization to hook a reader but then not bothering to try to capture the real lived experience of what it's like to be a kid with albinism. Very weird, too, that the author is basically using albinism as a clue in her 'locked room' mystery. The protagonist is trying to figure out who her dad is and she uncovers clues, the biggest of which is that there are other albino kids in town and so she presumes that she must be related to them. It was... weird. And felt exploitative.

Also, in this modern world, in the era of #MeToo, it was exceedingly uncomfortable to see a scene were a character grabs someone and kisses them, without their consent, and then brushes off the other character's concern about how the kiss crossed a boundary as no big deal. Uh, it is a big deal. And the fact that it's a girl who forces the kiss on a boy does not make it okay. And to have the action go unchallenged is also not okay. Read the room, writers. We're trying to show kids what it looks like to gain consent, and this ain't it.

And finally, just on a story level, this was one of those books where the entire plot hinges on the fact that one character can't just have an honest conversation with the other. I get that kids often feel powerless to confront adults, but still, it's not an unreasonable expectation that a child might want to know who their mysterious missing father is. The mother just withheld that information for a really implausible reason and refused to share a single detail about him... I just... it was really hollow for me. Felt way too implausible and convenient.

I'd give this one a pass.
Profile Image for Barbara.
13.2k reviews277 followers
October 28, 2018
Twelve-year-old Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow has become convinced that her roof is a magnet that attracts all sorts of objects to it. As a NASA satellite is due to leave its orbit and land on Earth, Robyn becomes convinced that it will have no choice but to land where the other objects have landed. As she and other residents of Calliope, her hometown, wait to see what happens, Robyn learns the origin of her name while her class is reading A Midsummer Night's Dream and decides to find her father. As she searches--with a lot of help from her best friend, Nickel Bugden, she stumbles upon several leads, including a news story featuring several youngsters who are albino just like her. I liked this girl a lot and give her points for being persistent, but given that she lives in a very small town, I'm not sure why no one had ever told her the truth about her father in the first place. Another reviewer noted that she liked the town's quirky citizens and their odd names and ways, and I'd have to agree that they add to the book's appeal with even Robyn's grandmother doing battle with their nosy neighbor. And I certainly could not imagine making a living hosting fairy-themed birthday parties for little ones as her mother does. It would be lots of fun at first--until it's not.
Profile Image for Terryann.
575 reviews8 followers
July 15, 2018

Gr - 5-6
Robyn is afraid for her life. She’s just learned that a NASA satellite will be crashing to the earth in a few weeks. NASA says it could hit anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere and probably not even on land, but Robyn knows it’s going to land right on the roof of her house. That’s because Robyn’s house has a magnet roof and everything lands there. Parachuters, frisbees, kites, cats and more have turned up on Robyn’s roof! Robyn has to hurry and find out who her real father is so that she can a) get him to help her find a new place to stay until the satellite lands or b) sign a form to help her change her name to something not so fairyish. The last thing she wants on her gravestone is Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow! Robyn enlists her best friend in one caper after another in order to get to her goal. What Goes Up is a quirky, fun story set in a town filled with unique and amusing characters. Robyn’s growth in the story is natural and her resolutions to her problems are thoughtful. Recommended to fans of Carl Hiaasen.
Profile Image for Karen.
1,090 reviews6 followers
January 6, 2019
This is a sweet coming-of-age book about Robyn (named for Shakespeare’s famous fairy Puck) who lives in an eccentric town with an eccentric fairy-obsessed mother (her mom’s business is hosting fairy-themed toddler birthday parties in her fairy-themed house dressed as a fairy) and her not-quite-as-eccentric grandmother. Even Robyn’s house is eccentric (in addition to the fairy decor). The roof attracts -- almost magically -- all kinds of frisbees, balls, kites, and even the occasional skydiver. One day Robyn and her family learn that a NASA satellite is falling to Earth and she is convinced it will be the next item to land on her roof. While watching the news, she learns about a family from a nearby town with several Albino children and becomes convinced she must be related to them. Anxiety over the falling satellite combined with the discovery of this nearby family, inspires Robyn to search for her absent father. While the author has thrown a lot of things into this book, at its heart it is a sweet story about a girl just trying to find her place in the world.
Profile Image for Susan.
508 reviews3 followers
January 12, 2019
This quirky MG novel, which releases October 30, will make you laugh out loud as it tugs at your heartstrings. I loved Robyn’s mom, who dresses in tutus and fairy wings and makes a living having toddler fairy parties, her grandma who loves Robyn with all of her heart, but has a running feud with their crazy next door neighbor who insists she’s FBI, and especially her best friend Nickel, who is there for Robyn, no matter what.

We learn Robyn is an albino, but this is not discussed in depth in the story. This wasn’t a problem for me, because I just enjoyed the quirkiness and warmth of the book, rather than expecting a window into the world of an albino child. For those looking for funny story about friendship, family and finding where you belong, this is a great choice. I would recommend it be added to elementary and middle school collections for grades 4-7.
Profile Image for Amber.
220 reviews10 followers
October 15, 2018
I honestly love how quirky this book was at times. Robyns mom is a trip with her tutus and fairy wings; and the fact that she makes a living by hosting toddler fairy parties is the cutest thing ever. The apple didn't fall far from the tree either, because grandma is a bit odd as well. She has a war going on with a neighbor that swears she's FBI. That all goes very well with the fact that the house attracts all kinds of refugee items. I find it hilarious that Robyn wants to seek her dad out for a name change to avoid embarrassment, but also to get to know him before she gets annihilated by space junk, There is definitely a lot going on in this book, especially in less than 250 pages but it doesn't muddle or ruin the book. Pretty enjoyable read. 3.5 stars, but since I can't give it that here, 3 it is.
3,235 reviews28 followers
October 19, 2018
Odd little tale. I always like quirky ones best and this one wasn't disappointing. This book does have odd characters,Robyn is albino (though this has nothing to do with the story), and the story revolves around her and her family, friends and neighbors, and a satellite that is going to fall on her home! She's also searching for her father. Her mother has never has never told her about him (and for some odd reason she's never asked?). Anyway, her house attracts junk like a magnet, so it's a given that the space junk is going to hit it. Funny story overall about a loving family and their friends. Kids 4th grade up will likely enjoy it and they should! It's a great and busy read!

I received a Kindle ARC in exchange for a fair review from Netgalley.
Profile Image for Julie Overpeck.
117 reviews4 followers
October 28, 2018
Thank you to Random House Kids for a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

While the theme is common, this cute and quirky tale has some original elements that move the classic “kid thinks she knows better than all of the adults around her” story to one that is entertaining and fresh. Everything falls on her roof as if it is magnetic. Nickel’s siblings are Dime and Penny. Mr. Bones rides a rickshaw for $1 a trip. With all of the silliness mixed with serious, I think this would make a fun movie.

Readers of Elly Swart’s Smart Cookie and Susan Crowley’s FInding Esme will like this book.
Profile Image for Valerie.
105 reviews
Read
September 30, 2021
Fun characters and premise. It is easy to empathize with Robyn Tinkerbell Goodfellow as she searches for her father and longs to change her name. I also loved her fairy-loving Mom who makes a living throwing fairy-themed parties for children, and with her feisty Grandma, who doesn't put up with the nosy neighbor's accusations. And then there's the roof that keeps attracting...well, a little bit of everything! No wonder Robyn worries that some space junk will hit it too.
Profile Image for Laura Gardner.
1,680 reviews113 followers
August 7, 2018
#kidlitexchange #partner This quirky book maybe wasn’t for me? I would have liked a little more exploration of what it was like for the main character to have albinism. I also found it confusing why her mother kept her in the dark about her father. No big flaws (except the balloon release at the end—why?), but I also didn’t love it.
Profile Image for Christie.
752 reviews2 followers
December 29, 2018
This book had a main character that like-liked her best friend so I think I'd recommend this one for middle-schoolers rather than younger. But other than that, this was a quirky cute story
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