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The Holographic Universe

4.15  ·  Rating details ·  7,595 ratings  ·  493 reviews
Today nearly everyone is familiar with holograms, three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser.

Now, two of the world's most eminent thinkers -- University of London physicists David Bohm, a former protege of Einstein's and one of the world's most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, one of the architects of ou
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Paperback, 352 pages
Published May 6th 1992 by Harper Perennial (first published 1991)
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4.15  · 
Rating details
 ·  7,595 ratings  ·  493 reviews


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Ade Bailey
Sep 07, 2008 rated it liked it
Shelves: slowly-reading
I have decided to add a new shelf called 'slowly reading'. I am reading this book slowly and carefully. Sometimes a paragraph or two is enough for me to stop and digest. Also, often I want to 'spin off' from a section and read related stuff, in books or on the internet. I am reading this in conjunction with Murray Gell-Mann's 'The Quark and the Jaguar', and as happens sometimes they seem to make a good pair. Both are very different in content and approach, yet they are similar in that they show ...more
Manuel Antão
Jun 17, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 2019
If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.


Fooking Physics: "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot



Some say there exists only one interpretation of quantum mechanics, and that is the many-worlds interpretation. But there exists another explanation as described by Michael Talbot in his book “Holographic Universe”; here is an excerpt where he writes of Karl Pribram a neurophysiologist at Stanford:

'... Pribam realised that the objective world does not exist, at least not in t
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Emma Sea
Dec 13, 2015 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: dnf
I thought this would be heavier on the quantum physics, and way less 'Hey, a poltergeist materialized cold spaghetti on my chest once in New York and a holographic universe explains everything'

When your 'evidence' for the paranormal includes Sathya Sai Baba then this is not my book, my friends.
Andrew Lutz
Jul 27, 2008 rated it really liked it
Q: So the Universe is one enormous holograph aye?
A: Uh-huh.

Q: Does that mean that all those AmRep Dope, Guns, and F*$@ing in the Streets cassettes aren't as good as I remember?
A: No. And I'm not sure how they directly relate to the book.

So every part of a holograph contains the entirety of the holograph. So if you were to cut it in two, each piece would contain the whole "image." Suddenly you would have two pictures of a dolphin jumping over a rainbow. Then four! Et cetera!!! This books likens
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Helena Harper
The Holographic Universe

This must be one of the most fascinating, if not the most fascinating book I have ever read, and it is a must-read for anyone who is even remotely curious about who and what we really are or who wants to see spirituality meeting science. The claims that are made are backed up by numerous scientific studies, but it doesn't blow you away with scientific jargon. It's written in an easy-to-read style and the different chapters are split up into subsections, which also helps.
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Brian
Jun 01, 2013 rated it it was ok
There is much fascinating material in Michael Talbot's book, including discussion of scientific theories of the nature of reality and our perception thereof, as well as anecdotal accounts and clinical data regarding a vast array of parapsychological phenomena. Talbot believes that the holographic model of space-time and consciousness developed by David Bohm, Karl Pribram, and others can explain phenomena ranging from UFO encounters to psychic abilities and religious miracles, all of which, it is ...more
Dennis
Aug 31, 2008 rated it it was amazing
The book that will change your life. Without wanting to spoil the read, or without the urge to get to in-depth about the subject matter in a simple review, I can sum the book up as an alternate view on both quantum physics and neuro-science, and the postulations that the book makes throughout its course are simply marvelous to read about. If there were 6-stars, I'd give this a 6.
Brandon
Jul 31, 2007 rated it liked it
by michael talbot. this is a fun forray into the grand theory of everything. basically, everything is a hologram acording to physicist David Bohm ("Wholeness and the Implicate Order"): waves interfere with each other to form images, objects, everything. that which we can perceive is the explicate order and that which we cannot is the implicate. the implicate contains the explicate, and the boundaries are also constantly wavering. the interesting thing about a hologram is that every part of the h ...more
Ruhl
Apr 28, 2012 rated it it was amazing
With The Holographic Universe Michael Talbot has created his Masterpiece.
For anyone even remotely interested in the convergence of Science and Metaphysics, this book is a must-read. Talbot masterfully combines science, research, theories on Human Consciousness, and eloquence into a colorful collage which in my opinion remains un-rivaled as the pinnacle of its genre. His narrative is factually detailed while remaining unpretentious; at times he is capable of reducing the empyrean to the mundane.
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Brian
Oct 17, 2008 rated it it was ok
In this book, the presentation of numerous historical accounts of the miraculous from the point of view of a believer is the central theme. Out-of body, near-death, and otherwise supernatural experiences are discussed, and the uniting theme is that the "natural laws" within which physics operates cannot explain all that we observe. What does, you ask? Well, imagine that everything is actually a pan-dimensional interference pattern stemming from a truly holographic universe. What does that mean, ...more
Kalin
Dec 18, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I started reading this book about a decade ago and, for reasons that I can't remember anymore (gave it to a friend?), left it not even half-way through.

I shall finish it someday.

However, even the first part--with the theory of memory as a holographic film--has vastly influenced my perception of the way we human beings think.

Highly recommended: it resonates with basically all my observations of the world around. So much so that I hardly know where to start if someone asks for a more specific rec
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Luca Mauri
Dec 26, 2013 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: on, sep, 6, finished, 2010
This is probably the first time I buy a book thinking about a subject and discovering a total different text.
Apparently this book should talk about the theory of holographic universe, explaining what it means for the reality to appear three-dimensional while it really is bi-dimensional. This should be about information theory, black hole entropy and so on.

Surprisingly this book is totally different: it just take some holographic principles for granted and start by discussing each and every kind
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Leslie M.
Apr 29, 2013 rated it really liked it
I have to admit, when I first encountered the idea of us being holograms in a holographic universe it rocked my world. This book builds a case for it being perhaps the most logical theory about the universe shared by many, though certainly not all, physicists. Physics dominates the first third of the book. Talbot makes this portion fairly easy to follow, with some included diagrams.

A holographic universe can account for psychics, clairvoyants, out-of-body and near-death experiences, and other od
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Liz
Sep 03, 2010 rated it it was amazing
Thought-provoking book, and one of my all time faves. I have purchased this book a few times and after reading it I always loan it to someone with no expectation that I'll ever get it back...and I never have. An absolute must read!
Julie
Jul 28, 2012 rated it it was amazing
One of the most scintillating books I've ever read! :)
Aaron
Jan 29, 2016 rated it really liked it

I would say the first third of this book was very good and captivating. The book then drifted into more of a vast amount of cherry picked anecdotal support for mysticism. I understand this is the author's forte, belief and according to himself, personal experiences. But I thought the book would have used the unexplainable types of paranormal events that some people have experienced and/or witnessed to help support or explain the "holographic universe" theory principles analogously. Instead, the
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Cathy
May 27, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Very fun book to read! This book presents anecdotal and scientific evidence in the argument that the universe is actually a combination of various frequencies which our brains then interpret into what we experience as reality. The author uses examples ranging from Near Death Experiences to salamander brain experiments to argue his point.
Overall, I believe a lot of what he is presenting. He does a good job of noting references, but near the end he starts getting a bit more personal in presenting
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Jennifer
May 22, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: everyone
Recommended to Jennifer by: BodyTalk Reference
Basically, a mind-blowing book that should be a requirement for anyone interested in the universe, themselves, others, and how they are all really the same thing. Explains paranormal abilities incredibly well...enough to make the skeptic take note. Incidently, also explains how BodyTalk works...i.e. there is truly only one person in the room during a session. Muscle testing is used to confirm what the practitioner already knows.
Cooper Cooper
Jul 29, 2009 rated it really liked it
This book is a popular treatment of the ideas of psychologist Karl Pribram and physicist David Bohm, which in turn are based on the concept of holography. Hungarian scientist Dennis Gabor invented (discovered?) holography, and was awarded the Nobel Prize the development of the laser allowed University of Michigan scientists to verify Gabor's theory in the laboratory. Holography produces, in thin air, the three-dimensional image (a hologram) of an object. This is accomplished by splitting a laser ...more
Jason
Aug 01, 2010 rated it liked it
Recommended to Jason by: Mark J. Williams; *Poker Without Cards,* Ben Mack
"Considered together, Bohm and Pribram's theories provide a profound new way of looking at the world: Our brains mathematically construct objective reality by interpreting frequencies that are ultimately projections from another dimension, a deeper order of existence that is beyond both space and time: The brain is a hologram enfolded in a holographic universe." (p. 54)

As you may imagine, I was fascinated with this book when I began reading it in 1994 at the suggestion of a respected friend. At
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Mangoo
Aug 30, 2011 rated it really liked it
This book was probably one of the first to divulgate the conceptions of Bohm about implicate/explicate order, and of Pribram about the nature of brain's activity, and to derive from them some conclusions for our daily world view. This by itself makes the book worth having, though the actual discussion it includes may not please everyone.
Bohm and Pribram agreed that our reality is in fact holographic, and so was the operational principle of the brain (a reader of information concerning the hologr
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Cat Noe
Nov 28, 2013 rated it did not like it
Recommends it for: Only very critical readers
I hate to rate a book halfway through, but the only way I can continue to read this piece is by consigning it to the "science fiction" shelf. I loved the quantum theory pieces at the beginning, and spent a few pleasant mornings toying with ideas offered in the first chapters. The approach, however, has grown steadily less scientific in ways that set my analysis training into convulsions. Anecdotes are not evidence, not every study is unbiased, and credentials and supporting information have to b ...more
David Beers
Jul 15, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Mind = blown. For those looking for a potentially scientific / rational explanation for supernatural or extra-sensory phenomena, look no further. This book is on my "five most important books I've ever read" list, perhaps right at the top. The holographic model of the universe was not dreamed up by the author, but he stands on the shoulders of others to bring a very complex and advanced concept to a non-physicist level of comprehension. The holographic model applies to the mind as well, and this ...more
Addicted to Books
5 Mesmerizing Mindblowing- Michael Talbot- I wish-you-were-not-dead-and-I-am-madly-in-love-with-you- stars



About Michael Talbot: Michael Talbot was an openly gay writer who was highly popular among the intellecuals New York in the 80s and 90s. Many people looked up to him as a role model too. He was diagnosed with leukemia. People claimed often he joked that he wished he was infected with the more classy and sophisticated disease of Aids and be tragic about it.
In 1992, Talbot died of lymphocyti
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Stephan
Aug 07, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: the phy-curious
This foray into the new physics of the 20th century, including the most theoretical of the theoretical, the holographic model for the universe, is on the short list of books that knocked down some walls inside my brain. Maybe you have to read it when you're young, though, before you brain gets calcified with age, unbending, certain. I'm glad I read it when I did.
Christopher Roberts
May 30, 2018 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: religion, science
I'm shocked how large a percentage of the reviews on Goodreads are of the "five stars, this totally blew my mind" variety. This book is absolutely terrible. It is easily the worst book I've read this year so far, and would be the worst book of last year, and nearly any other year. That should give you a good idea how much I hated this book.

My experience with this book is very similar to my experience with the book Brain Wars. I picked them both up off the clearance table for science books at t
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Christopher Hivner
May 12, 2012 rated it liked it
The first part of this book is fascinating as the author explains a theory of how the brain works like a hologram. Apparently if you cut a piece of holographic film, each piece still contains the entire object. The theory states that each section of the brain contains all of our memories and knowledge. Then it moves on to a theory of the universe as a hologram, stating that every electron actually contains all the matter and time of the universe. I'll admit I found the physics theory hard to com ...more
Daniel Pendergraft
May 12, 2013 rated it really liked it
This book.... whoa. I didn't at first like it because metaphysical theories usually make sense to me intuitively and the pace seemed kind of slow and pedantic, but that's just necessary since most would not find the information easily digestible. As it picked up steam... quite amazing. There were many times in reading where my inner skeptic was yelling in protest, but the psychic, "supranatural" phenomena he discusses are well-documented (though not understood). Yet the mainstream science commun ...more
Warren
Jan 23, 2009 rated it it was ok
Starts out promising, with two respected scientists, one who theorizes that holograms can explan some quantum physical properties and the other who uses them to explain how the human brain behaves. Up to that point, I'd have given the book 4 or 5 stars. Then, suddenly, it degenerates into talking about ESP, out of body experiences, telepathy and every other paranormal thing one could dredge up. I ended up skimming over the latter parts of the book because of that. If you have any interest in thi ...more
Hiroshi
Apr 05, 2009 rated it did not like it
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
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Michael Talbot was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan in 1953. As a young man, he moved to New York City, where he pursued a career as a freelance writer, publishing articles in Omni, The Village Voice, and others, often exploring the confluence between science and the spiritual.

Talbot published his first novel, The Delicate Dependency: A Novel of the Vampire Life as an Avon paperback original in 1982
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“Oh, they're always saying that. But they are only the Masters of Outer Darkness," he corrected.” 2 likes
“THE VASTNESS OF OUR MEMORY
Holography also explains how our brains can store so many memories in so little space. The brilliant Hungarian-born physicist and mathematician John von Neumann once calculated that over the course of the average human lifetime, the brain stores something on the order of 2. 8 x 1020 (280, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000, 000) bits of information. This is a staggering amount of information, and brain researchers have long struggled to come up with a mechanism that explains such a vast capability. Interestingly, holograms also possess a fantastic capacity for information storage. By changing the angle at which the two lasers strike a piece of photographic film, it is possible to record many different images on the same surface. Any image thus recorded can be retrieved simply by illuminating the film with a laser beam possessing the same angle as the original two beams. By employing this method researchers have calculated that a one-inch-square of film can store the same amount of information contained in fifty Bibles!”
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