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Den namnlösa staden

3.65  ·  Rating details ·  2,153 ratings  ·  158 reviews
Fjärran i de arabiska öknarna ligger den namnlösa staden, sönderfallande och stum, dess låga murar nästan gömda av oräkneliga tidsåldrars sand. Jag borde ha vetat att araberna hade goda skäl till att undvika den. Ändå trotsade jag dem och vandrade ut i den obeträdda ödemarken med min kamel. Jag ensam har sett staden, och det är varför inget annat ansikte har så förfärliga ...more
ebook, 16 pages
Published August 25th 2016 by Fafner Förlag (first published November 1921)
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Corentin Gastalle Lovecraft doesn't describe that part, but we might assume that since the main character survived this event, it went like this: when the "ghost" wind…moreLovecraft doesn't describe that part, but we might assume that since the main character survived this event, it went like this: when the "ghost" wind blows the gate closed, he regains some consciousness and escapes.(less)
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3.65  · 
Rating details
 ·  2,153 ratings  ·  158 reviews


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Bill  Kerwin
Sep 04, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

While reading Lord Dunsany’s “The Probable Adventure of Three Literary Men,” H.P. Lovecraft became haunted by one Dunsany phrase: “the unreverberate blackness of the abyss.” The ghost of that phrase inspired a dream, and later, when H.P. awakened, he found he possessed the idea for a story. That story idea soon became “The Nameless City” (1921), one of Lovecraft favorites, and often considered the first appearance of the Chthulu Mythos.

It is a favorite with me too. Its beginning evokes the eerie
...more
Lyn
Dec 08, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
At a poker table in a cavern in Hell sits Asmodeus, Cthulu, Orcus and Beelzebub discussing H.P. Lovecraft’s short story The Nameless City.

Asmodeus: I like what the young man is doing; it’s fresh and original and speaks to me.

Cthulu: I could not agree more, of course I would LOVE it as he is paying HOMAGE to yours truly.

Orcus: Cthulu, you are such a DROLL sea creature, while my seers reflect that this may become the first in what may become the “Cthulu Mythos” this is still just a very early stor
...more
Steve
Jul 27, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
First off, it's a short story. I started reading this story this morning, kind of vaguely thinking I had probably already read it. (It was rainy, dark. Lovecraft seemed appropriate.) I was probably recalling Lovecraft's "Under the Pyramids." Anyway, "The Nameless City" is the first story in a massive (and cheap) collection of Lovecraft's (complete) stories that I got for my Kindle. What a nice and creepy surprise! How I missed this over the years is beyond me. It's mentioned as being the first C ...more
Joey Woolfardis
My very first Lovecraft.

It was written supremely well, if inundated with many long, fantastical words that may or may not have been needed. Can't say I was scared or horrified or even that moved by it, but it was definitely intriguing.

A lone narrator wanders the desert and finds himself in a lost-and nameless-city, just screaming to be explored. Great descriptions of what is to be found there, if not altogether easy to follow. I feel like there is a certain way to read Lovecraft that I hopefully
...more
Steph [They/Them] (Wickedjr Reads)
Weird, atmospheric, intriguing. I liked it.
Mizuki
Mar 23, 2016 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror
It is a very standard and typical Lovecraftian horror short story: a lone narrator mumbling about his experience of extreme horror in some ruin of a long-lost ancient city within an Araby desert. He believes this nameless city was built by a race before humans and he may, or may not see something horrible in the dead of the night before he turns tail and flees from this ruin.

The story is short, but the description is long winded and wordy and Lovecraft didn't bother to give you any break by putt
...more
Emm - One Thousand Years of Books
"That is not dead which can eternal lie, and with strange aeons even death may die."

Before I get into the short story itself, this is where the sour root of the Necronomicon began to sprout its mysteries. While the cursed book won't actually show itself in Lovecraft's work for a few more years, "The Nameless City" is where it began to grow its pages.
The Necronomicon became so famous and so dreaded, that people began to fear its appearance in real life. Similar to how people thought the Voynich M
...more
Mir
May 23, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
When I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed. I was traveling in a parched and terrible valley under the moon, and afar I saw it protruding uncannily above the sands as parts of a corpse may protrude from an ill-made grave. Fear spoke from the age-worn stones...

This opening reads like a dream, but we're not in the Dreamlands this time; we're in "Araby," albeit some region thereof where no living man has set foot. Here our protagonist finds a typically Lovecraftian edifice: enormous,
...more
Finooola
The main character in this one was such a weirdo, I found it distracting from the narrative. I mean, I know lot of horror depends for its existence on characters who will walk into completely inadvisable places, and I'm fine with that, but what kind of person crawls down a deep, dark tunnel so low that they have to crawl and slither through at points, and then doesn't even notice when their torch goes out and keeps going? My other problem with this was Lovecraft describing completely neutral thi ...more
Manuel Veloso
I find that Lovecraft's style of writing is a bit too forced. He relies heavily on making the horror explicit through words such a "terrible" "horrendous" or "terrifying" to convey the dread of his plot instead of letting the reader feel these emotions trough his own imagination. The way he conveys the aura of his settings is clearly sufficient to inspire terror in he reader without the need to emphasize these feelings explicitly. In my opinion, such abuse of the horror adjectives tends to actua ...more
Ahmad Qassab Bashi
Thank god it is a short story
Alex Bright
3 stars

More of an exposition to Lovecraft’s universe than an actual story. Not that I’m complaining. The descriptions alone are worth it.
Baal Of
May 20, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror, fiction
I'm actually reading this from a giant "complete" collection of Lovecraft's fiction on my Kindle, but I'm going to log as many of the novels and stories separately, so I can actually make ratings and comments on each one, really for my own benefit. I am a big fan of Lovecraft's mythology, but I've only read a smattering of the stories so far. I tend to find his ideas and creations better than his actual writing, which sometimes comes across a bit overblown and baroque. In this case, the story is ...more
Jakk Makk
Aug 10, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Inspirational mood and setting.
Andrew Leon
Jul 04, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
"The Nameless City" is a city so horrible and horrifying that it doesn't even have a name, hence the title. It's only spoken about in whispers and as threats to children and its facts have long been lost in antiquity. It's the murmurings that draw the unnamed protagonist to find it, but just its skeleton in the desert causes such fear in the man, he says that no other has even known fear like him.

So, of course, he goes in.

But he does wait till morning.

Lovecraft's writing is very atmospheric, and
...more
Melissa Levine
Lovecraft's writing style. I think the fact that Lovecraft uses so much detail when describing.....everything....is what I don't like about his stories. I can get a somewhat good image in my head of what is taking place in the story, it's just that the author goes on and on for so many more sentences? paragraphs? that it's just too much. This is only my second story and I wasn't able to get into either one. Not a fan.
Brenda
Mar 06, 2016 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: meh, so-plain
2.5 stars!
Lovecraft's writing is very atmospheric.
Marts  (Thinker)
Horror story by Lovecraft surrounding an ancient Arabian ruin.
Jonathan Lees
About:
The Nameless City is a horror story by Lovecraft, published in The Wolverine in November 1921

--

Review:
This was actually to be my first ever reading of Lovecrafts work, so I really didn’t know what to expect; aside from my anticipation of a dark, and elaborate, style of writing.

Certainly, that is present – and, something I enjoy.

We begin reading from the perspective of an adventurer/archaeologist, who immediately foretells of a melancholic doom hovering over the place, as they spy it in the
...more
Ryan Rikic
May 27, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
When I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed. I was travelling in a parched and terrible valley under the moon.....okay you get it. Im really into Lovecraft. If your into Tombs, Egypt and the idea of hidden cities this is a great read.
Austin Wright
Jan 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Finally diving into some good and obscure Lovecraft! Leslie Klinger's notes make the process of reading Lovecraft 300% better. Interesting history, interesting tie-ins with other stories, interesting universe-building!
Netanella
When I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed. I was travelling in a parched and terrible valley under the moon, and afar I saw it protruding uncannily above the sands as parts of a corpse may protrude from an ill-made grave. Fear spoke from the age-worn stones of this hoary survivor of the deluge, this great-grandmother of the eldest pyramid; and a viewless aura repelled me and bade me retreat from antique and sinister secrets that no man should see, and no man else had dared to see ...more
Godzilla
Apr 11, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror, 2012, kindle
Lovecraft takes us on an Arabian adventure, with the protagonist exploring a mysterious, desolate city.

The depictions of the ruins are gloriously textured, and the writing transports you to the windswept desert with ease.

The story takes a darker turn as the exploration of a dark temple starts.

As ever Lovecraft builds the tension with ease, and describes the unfolding events and scenes vividly.
Davonna Juroe
Nov 02, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: short-stories
Short story by Lovecraft that heralds the Cthulhu Mythos saga.

It tells the tale of a man exploring a ruined city in the deserts of the Arabian Peninsula. And I knew I was in for a treat when the main character described that the Nameless City's architecture was low. Too low, in fact, for humans to walk through.

As with all his stories, Lovecraft uses scene description to heighten the fear and horror of the main character's plight.

Fun stuff!
Meena
May 19, 2016 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is the first Lovecraftian story I've read. I knew I'd be bored reading it, so I went with listening to the audiobook instead. Not too bad, not too good. I actually listened to the audiobook twice, first in English and then in French.

I wonder how the main character didn't notice when his torch went out. I mean, wasn't it dark down there?! Anyway.
Jon
Sep 29, 2018 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror, short-story
My introductory session with Lovecraft, as chosen by being the first story in my recently purchased cheap-o mass market paperback collection that looks like somebody printed the pages out of their inkjet and slapped a Kinkos-designed paperback cover on them.

I can certainly see the appeal of Lovecraft, and I don't have much to say that hasn't already been covered in any random review of one of his short stories you could chance upon. His building of atmosphere is up to par and perhaps even excels
...more
M
May 05, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Little I can say about my fascination with great Lovecraft, that I haven't already said before. Master of building the atmosphere brings you such gradual tension that you can't help but experience with almost same intensity as the main character, how realistically described and overwhelming it is. This story for me is another great example of cognitive horror - utter fear of realizing or knowing something frightening- which is, in Lovecraft's opus, more bone chilling and terrifying than any othe ...more
Bob
Jan 23, 2018 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: horror, sci-fi, fiction
I'm embarrassed to confess this is the first story i've read by H.P. Lovecraft. It probably wasn't the best one to start off with. His writing style is reminiscent of Poe's with lots of description, lots of anticipation and an abrupt ending. This story is about an explorer who decides to investigate a long abandoned desert city which is cursed. No one has visited it and returned to describe it. Well, the hero of the story does find the nameless city and discovers strange caves, strange temples, ...more
R.G.
Jun 14, 2017 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
This is an extremely short story. It is also the first story I've read by Lovecraft. Perhaps because I've read so much about him and know his stories are about the strange unknown horrible things that lurk in the night I wasn't surprised by how this went about. The main character seems to have held onto denial a bit too much, but I do understand that sense of adventure and need to know that can drive a person into places they know they shouldn't go. It's that foolhardy idiocy of sensing somethin ...more
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12,281 followers
Howard Phillips Lovecraft, of Providence, Rhode Island, was an American author of horror, fantasy and science fiction.

Lovecraft's major inspiration and invention was cosmic horror: life is incomprehensible to human minds and the universe is fundamentally alien. Those who genuinely reason, like his protagonists, gamble with sanity. Lovecraft has developed a cult following for his Cthulhu Mythos, a
...more
“That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.”
751 likes
“When I drew nigh the nameless city I knew it was accursed. I was travelling in a parched and terrible valley under the moon, and afar I saw it protruding uncannily above the sands as parts of a corpse may protrude from an ill-made grave. Fear spoke from the age-worn stones of this hoary survivor of the deluge, this great-grandmother of the eldest pyramid; and a viewless aura repelled me and bade me retreat from antique and sinister secrets that no man should see, and no man else had ever dared to see.” 1 likes
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