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The Edible Women
 
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Margaret Atwood
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The Edible Women

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3.67  ·  Rating details ·  24,112 Ratings  ·  1,310 Reviews
Marian is determined to be ordinary. She lays her head gently on the shoulder of her serious fiancé and quietly awaits marriage. But she didn't count on an inner rebellion that would rock her stable routine, and her digestion. Marriage a la mode, Marian discovers, is something she literally can't stomach... The Edible Woman is a funny, engaging novel about emotional cannib ...more
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Published August 1st 1984 by Seal Books (first published 1969)
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Fabian
Mar 16, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A novel of major creepy power. Very different from her later books, "The Edible Woman" is about the destructive power of man-woman relationships and it takes place in a world of robotic emotions and mechanical compulsions (not too far off from the Victorian variety!).

The novel, a true avantgarde sociosexual depiction, borrows its demonic tone from Hawthorne, its cinematography from Cronenberg, its absurdism from David Lynch. Also, it contains all the brilliance & pseudo-silliness of Beckett
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Glenn Sumi
Feb 22, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Margaret Atwood’s prescient first novel still offers lots to chew on



Marian, a 20-something woman in 1960s Toronto, gets engaged to her dull-but-respectable lawyer boyfriend, Peter, then soon begins losing her appetite for food. This causes problems leading up to the wedding, as Marian suffers a serious identity crisis. Perhaps she doesn’t want to submit to this marriage, after all.

This was Margaret Atwood’s first novel, and besides the funny and insightful writing, the book was way ahead of its
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Julie
May 31, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Right around the time I turned 20, a boyfriend of mine dragged me to a Yes concert. I say “dragged” not because I have anything against the band, but because I knew only two of their songs, and I was the only girl going.

My then-boyfriend and his friends were big Yes fans, and they had rented a limo stocked with booze, and it was a real party scene in that vehicle. Well, it was a real party scene for them, less so for me, the girl who didn't know Yes songs, and the one who was becoming increasing
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Barry Pierce
I decided to re-read this because its white spine always calls my attention next to the black spines of Austen and Brontë. My review from two and a half years ago, to paraphrase Talking Heads, seems to talk a lot but not say anything.

The Edible Woman was Atwood's first novel, and thus I must treat it like a first novel. Atwood was twenty-six when she wrote this, and it reads like it. The novel presents itself as a tale of a women who is faced with the awful prospect of marriage. The thought of
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Meaghan
Jun 26, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.
Oriana
Jun 01, 2009 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
before Ohhh this book is like my favorite hoodie—threadbare and falling apart but so so soft and comfy, with all those little stains and patches as sweet reminders of long ago. Love love love love this book...


after Well yes, I do love this book as much as ever, but I was actually kind of surprised at how different it was from the last time I read it, oh, five or six years ago. Here are some reflections (in list form, because I'm feeling lazy):

1. I am still terribly and utterly in love with Dunca
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Rowena
Oct 28, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
What an unusual story. Marian is newly engaged and then discovers she can't eat certain foods, first meats and then almost everything else. What is her subconscious trying to tell her?

Atwood is a writer who amazes me every time I read her; it really is hard to categorize her writing. Her writing style on the other hand is exquisite, intelligent and witty at times.

The main theme of this book is relationships and how they can transform you. I enjoyed the first half of the book a lot more than I d
...more
Ferdy
Mar 08, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
4.5 stars - Spoilers

Loved this, it was weird and wonderful. I thought I was going to hate it after reading the first few chapters, it was so slow moving and boring. It was only until the main character (Marian) started to think strange thoughts and act totally nutty that I started to get really engrossed in the story and characters.

-I didn't like Marian whatsoever, she was passive, irritating and all round doormat. But despite being a largely pathetic and frustrating character, she was utterly e
...more
Jenny
Mar 29, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Υπόθεση: Η Μάριαν κάνει μια δουλειά που δεν την ενθουσιάζει (από την οποία όμως δεν βλέπει έξοδο διαφυγής),έχει σχέση με έναν άνδρα κατά του γάμου και των δεσμεύσεων,ενώ η ίδια αποζητά κάτι παραπάνω, και μένει με μια κοπέλα με την οποία δεν έχουν κανενα κοινό,πέρα από το ότι συγκατοικούν.Ξαφνικά αρραβωνιάζεται,παθαίνει κρίση ταυτότητας και γνωρίζεται με τον Ντάνκαν.

Αυτό το βιβλίο γράφτηκε τη δεκαετία του '60 κι όμως αγγίζει ευαίσθητες χορδές που παραμένουν διαχρονικές.Δεν ξέρω πώς ακριβώς να το
...more
Stela
Dec 12, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well, I liked this novella more than The Handmaid Tale, and that was quite a book!
The story is about Marian, an ordinary young woman who works for the advertising section of an enterprise, and leads an equally ordinary life, until two things, apparently disconnected, happen: her boyfriend, Peter, asks her to marry him and she discovers she is no longer able to eat - first meat, than even vegetables.
The book was interpreted as a metaphor of consumerism which governs our society, but it's more t
...more
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Margaret Atwood was born in 1939 in Ottawa and grew up in northern Ontario, Quebec, and Toronto. She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe College.

Throughout her writing career, Margaret Atwood has received numerous awards and honourary degrees. She is the author of more than thirty-five volumes of poetry, childr
...more
More about Margaret Atwood...
“What else can I do? Once you've gone this far you aren't fit for anything else. Something happens to your mind. You're overqualified, overspecialized, and everybody knows it. Nobody in any other game would be crazy enough to hire me. I wouldn't even make a good ditch-digger, I'd start tearing apart the sewer-system, trying to pick-axe and unearth all those chthonic symbols - pipes, valves, cloacal conduits... No, no. I'll have to be a slave in the paper-mines for all time.” 26 likes
“I always thought eating was a ridiculous activity anyway. I'd get out of it myself if I could, though you've got to do it to stay alive, they tell me.” 25 likes
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