Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “A Room with a View” as Want to Read:
A Room with a View
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Read Book* *Different edition

A Room with a View

3.91  ·  Rating details ·  151,100 ratings  ·  5,628 reviews
"But you do," he went on, not waiting for contradiction. "You love the boy body and soul, plainly, directly, as he loves you, and no other word expresses it ..."

Lucy has her rigid, middle-class life mapped out for her, until she visits Florence with her uptight cousin Charlotte, and finds her neatly ordered existence thrown off balance. Her eyes are opened by the unconvent
...more
Paperback, 119 pages
Published January 1st 2005 by Digireads.com (first published 1908)
More Details... Edit Details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about A Room with a View, please sign up.
Popular Answered Questions
Ms Miaow I think you might find the novel not as colourful as the film (which I loved too!),there's quite a bit of philosophy and soul searching which couldn't…moreI think you might find the novel not as colourful as the film (which I loved too!),there's quite a bit of philosophy and soul searching which couldn't all fit in the film.
But I would say that the film was quite faithful to the book,a few exceptions like George had black hair in the book,Cecil was fair I think!
But the book won't change your view of the characters/story,and definitely a safe read.(less)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne CollinsHarry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. RowlingTo Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeePride and Prejudice by Jane AustenTwilight by Stephenie Meyer
Best Books Ever
51,153 books — 201,562 voters
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee1984 by George OrwellHarry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. RowlingThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Hobbit, or There and Back Again by J.R.R. Tolkien
Best Books of the 20th Century
7,554 books — 49,352 voters


More lists with this book...

Community Reviews

Showing 1-30
Average rating 3.91  · 
Rating details
 ·  151,100 ratings  ·  5,628 reviews


More filters
 | 
Sort order
Start your review of A Room with a View
Fionnuala
There is a great line in A Room with a View about a book that has been abandoned in a garden: The garden was deserted except for a red book, which lay sunning itself upon the gravel path.
The author then describes what the main characters are doing in various locations adjacent to the garden, but meanwhile the red book is allowed to be caressed all the morning by the sun and to raise its covers slightly, as though to acknowledge the caress. The description of the book seems very innocent but the
...more
Candi
Jul 12, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
4.5 stars

"Italians are born knowing the way. It would seem that the whole earth lay before them, not as a map, but as a chess-board, whereon they continually behold the changing pieces as well as the squares. Any one can find places, but the finding of people is a gift from God."

Ah, there is nothing like a vacation to rest the body and soothe one’s soul… well, this would be the ideal holiday in any case. Family trips to Disney World would not fall in this category. Nor would my latest adventures
...more
Henry Avila
Oct 31, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The Pensione (pension) Bertolini in Florence, Italy has everything for the visiting tourists, Miss Lucy Honeychurch and her older poorer cousin Charlotte Bartlett a rather overbearing chaperon, fine food, (not really) wines not too bad this is Italy and a room with a view. Unfortunately not for the cousins, their promised accommodations went to Mr.Emerson and his quiet gloomy son George. If you can't trust the Signora Bertolini, the Italian owner of this establishment more English than one in Lo ...more
Jim Fonseca
May 22, 2020 rated it really liked it
A Room with a View by E. M. Forster

A novel of manners by a master. It is set in England in the early 1900’s -- the Edwardian era. As we are told in the introduction, D. H. Lawrence wrote “About social existence, E. M. Forster knew everything.” Christopher Isherwood called him the expert on “My England.” If we switched the setting to the USA, I would think I was reading Edith Wharton. Or Henry James without the subclauses.

description

We start off with a young upper-middle class British woman visiting Floren
...more
Steven Godin
Considered by many to be Forster's sunny day, and most optimistic novel, would start off in Italy, an Inn in Florence to be precise. Two sweet Edwardian females, Miss Lucy Honeychurch (adorable name) and her cousin, Charlotte the chaperone have a bit of a dilemma whilst holidaying, the silly Inn keeper promised them rooms with a view looking out onto the Arno River, but they end up facing the courtyard. (I would have gladly faced the courtyard if it meant being a Tuscan tourist, would have even ...more
Glenn Sumi
Edwardian-era propriety meets Italian passion with entertaining results in E.M. Forster’s sunny, slight, but ever so charming comedy of manners.

Well-known from the sumptuous Merchant-Ivory adaptation (which I rewatched immediately after finishing the book), the novel tells the story of Lucy Honeychurch, a proper English girl who, while on vacation in Florence with her cousin/chaperone, Miss Bartlett, meets George Emerson, a handsome but odd philosophical soul, who’s travelling with his eccentri
...more
Kevin Ansbro
"She knew that the intruder was ill-bred, even before she glanced at him."
-Charlotte Bartlett.

I was reminded of this, an old favourite of mine, when a Goodreads' review of the book, by @Apatt, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... had me instantly searching bookshelves for my own battered copy.

E. M. Forster writes in a way that would seem archaic now (natch), but the same codes of conduct and social divisions still apply in our modern age.

In pre-WWI England, travel to sunny Euro destinati
...more
Piyangie
A Room with a View is a story of love; a story of self-realization of a young woman; and a story of the Edwardian English society still governed by strict Victorian values. This is my first experience with E.M. Forster and I’m well rewarded.

Written at the beginning of the Edwardian era, Forster critically exposes the cultural restrictions, class difference, and rigidly maintained social status that had swallowed the English society. The story is set up in England and Italy and Forster with his
...more
Emily May
May 06, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics, 2012
3.5
I am in a classics mood, but after my recent completion of War and Peace I decided to try something a little lighter and less than one tenth of the size. This is how I found my way towards E. M. Forster's 130 page novel about a woman who is forced to make a decision between marrying a wealthy man she will never love and a man of lower class who she knows she can be happy with. Funnily enough, I think it was this story's length that slightly let it down for me, had it been a longer book I'm su
...more
Samadrita
Romantic comedy this is not. The rosiness of a woman stumbling upon convenient fantasy fulfillment by marrying into privilege and bourgeois wealth do not tinge the themes of this classic. Rather this aspires to the novelty of a sort of female bildungsroman. A woman who is roused into the acknowledgement of her desires and self through the unwitting intervention of men considered unworthy of being even good travel companions - how many male authors/poets/dramatists of Forster's generation have ca ...more
Madeline
Jul 07, 2011 rated it liked it
Shelves: the-list
What happens in Florence, stays in Florence.

Unless this is the early 1900's and you're visiting the city with your annoying spinster cousin, then you kiss some boy in a field of violets for like two seconds and nobody ever lets you forget it. Jeez, people.

This is a brief, sweet little novel about Lucy Honeychurch (winner of the prestigious award for Most Adorable Name Ever), who goes to Florence with previously-mentioned spinster cousin. Despite lack of A ROOM WITH A VIEW, Lucy has a very nice
...more
Carmen
Jun 22, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Anyone
I'm a sucker for a sweet, kind-hearted, naïve and sheltered heroine. Especially when they slowly learn how to be brave. So this book was perfect for me to read.

Lucy Honeychurch (how's that for a name) is a sheltered young Englishwoman in 1908. She lives with her mother and little brother Freddy. She goes on an exciting travel-abroad trip with her stuffy older cousin. There she meets the Emersons - also English - old Mr. Emerson who is loving and honest to a fault. His outspoken ways are consider
...more
Jean-Luke
Jan 09, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
No Room with No View (2020 Edition)

"They had no business to do it,” said Miss Bartlett, "no business at all. We were promised south rooms with a view close together, instead of which we have no rooms, with no view, and are unable to even enter the country. Oh, Lucy."

"I should have liked to see the dolphins now swimming in the Venice canals," said Lucy (she hadn't yet read the article saying this was not true). "But perhaps it's for the best, given--" But Lucy decided it was wiser not to bring up
...more
Joe Valdez
Feb 10, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction-general
Love is in the air--or maybe anxiously repressed--in February and my romantic literature jag begins with A Room with a View, the 1908 novel by E.M. Forster. Like a candy store, this book offers a bounty of treats that I found irresistible. There's a holiday in Italy. There's a boarding house with much ado. There are young lovers Lucy Honeychurch and George Emerson. There are bridges, summer storms and a hillside covered in great blue violets. There's a return to the heroine's home in Surrey, Eng ...more
Diane
I was overjoyed to discover that this book I had liked when I was in high school was even more charming and lovely than I remembered.

I'm not sure what impelled me to suddenly reread this novel about a young Englishwoman, Lucy Honeychurch, whose life is transformed after she visits Italy, but I'm glad I did. Forster's language is so inviting and engaging that as soon as I started reading, I didn't want to put down the book.

The story opens at a hotel in Florence, and Lucy is being chaperoned by h
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
A Room with a View, E.M. Forster
A Room with a View is a 1908 novel, by British writer E. M. Forster, about a young woman, in the restrained culture of Edwardian era England. Set in Italy and England, the story is both a romance and a humorous critique of English society, at the beginning of the 20th century.
Part one: The first part of the novel is set in Florence, Italy, and describes a young English woman's first visit to Florence, at a time when upper middle class English women were starting t
...more
Ted
It was Phaethon who drove them to Fiesole that memorable day, a youth all irresponsibility and fire, recklessly urging his master's horse up the stony hill.




Fiesole, in the hills northeast of Firenze 9/2/2007


I read this lovely little novel about three months after taking the picture above. I was so thrilled that I had actually been in Florence, where a part of the story takes place. The "main event" of the Florence episode occurs when the English ladies take a chaperoned carriage ride into the hi
...more
MsAprilVincent
This is the first book that I've just tipped over in love with in a long time.

Having seen the movie Howard's End, and knowing that E.M. Forster wrote in the late 19th/early 20th century, and having watched that episode of The Office where the Finer Things Club discussed this book, I fully expected it to be a dull, dry slog.

But it was not. It was a pleasure.

Lucy Honeychurch learns that the rules of society can--and sometimes should--be broken. She learns that she doesn't have to love a man just
...more
Apatt
Jun 10, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: classics
A couple of days before I started to read this book I have just read and reviewed E.M. Forster’s The Machine Stops an excellent science fiction short story first published in 1909 which is very well written, clever and prescient. Forster is of course not known for his sci-fi as he wrote only the one story (as far as I know). However, he is known for several classic novels including A Passage to India, Howards End and Where Angels Fear to Tread. All of which have been adapted into films. A Room w ...more
Phrynne
Jan 24, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: 5000-books
One of those classics which I always felt I must have read at some time in the past but apparently had not, so meeting Lucy Honeychurch for the first time was a great pleasure.

A Room with a View is a very enjoyable humorous critique of society, much in the style of Jane Austen. Lucy's travelling partner, Charlotte, could have come straight from an Austen novel. It is also a romance with, of all things, (view spoiler)(Spoiler alert there in case you
...more
Trish
Jun 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, classics
I imagine that in the early twentieth century, this book could have been marketed as a "beach" read. It's fast-paced, romantic, endearing, funny, dramatic and even fulfills a little bit of that wanderlust feeling we all get in the summer months.

Frankly, I couldn't stop smiling throughout this entire novel. This is one of those books in which the setting (though it may be as stunning as Florence, London, or the English countryside) takes a back seat to the vibrant and highly entertaining charact
...more
Perry
Jan 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: stela-eða-láni
"When I think of what life is, and how seldom love is answered by love, it is one of the moments for which the world was made." E.M. Forster, A Room with a View

A splendid novel centered on the young Lucy Honeychurch, both criticizing the restrained Edwardian era culture of England in which she lived and providing a romance with the passion of Italy infused in juxtaposition.

Forster masterfully and perceptively reviews the structure of society, and the imperfections and merits of each of its spher
...more
Chrissie
Published in 1908, this is a classical romance novel with humorous satirical bite. Love stories such as this have been told a million times, but the mordant wit with which Edwardian society is drawn is what makes it special. You read it to laugh. You know how it will end right from the start, but who cares? It's fun. It has a sweet, schmaltzy end that will leave you smiling.

I really have nothing else to say......... Critique of Edwardian life told through humor.

I listened to the audiobook narr
...more
Anthea Syrokou
Sep 12, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I was always curious about this book. The title is so well-known and I’ve heard the movie mentioned so many times. I wondered what was so special about this “room with a view”. I was pleasantly delighted when this room was introduced to me, literally and figuratively, in Florence Italy, where the protagonist, Lucy, along with her chaperone, her cousin Miss Charlotte Bartlett, holiday together. The reader, however, senses that Lucy would rather holiday by herself instead of with her uptight, judg ...more
Katie Lumsden
May 12, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Absolutely amazing. I love E.M. Forster - his writing is beautiful, his dialogue perfectly pitched, and the way he writes about love just amazing. I also love the way this novel looks at "respectability" and the position of women in Edwardian society.
CarolynMarieReads
"From her feet the ground sloped sharply into the view, and violets ran down in rivulets and streams and cataracts, irrigating the hillside with blue, eddying round the tree stems, collecting into pools in the hollows, covering the grass with spots of azure foam. But never again were they in such profusion; this terrace was the well-head, the primal source whence beauty gushed out to water the earth."
- E. M. Forster "A Room With A View"
🌿
I don't think my feeling of pathos after finishing this boo
...more
Aubrey
May 15, 2014 rated it really liked it
I don't deal with romance much. It's a trait that's bled over from real life experiences into my tastes for a very long time, but it wasn't until recently that I started vivisecting it for more credible reasons than "I don't like chick flicks/soap operas/other degenerating names for lovey dovey things that females are supposed to like". If there's one thing I've learned, it's that something is always wrong at the heart of things whenever the word "female" is incorporated into an instinctive disl ...more
Anna Luce
★★★★✰ 4 stars

“I want you to have your own thoughts even when I hold you in my arms.”


A Room with a View evokes a gentle Edwardian idyll: we follow the story's characters through their paced long walks, their wanderings through Italy (in Florence there is the lovely view of the River Arno, Basilica of Santa Croce, Piazza della Signoria, and later on in Fiesole's high fields Lucy, our main character, will undergo a life changing experience), and observe them in their British ‘habitat'.
Forster'
...more
Claude's Bookzone
I won’t be protected. I will choose for myself what is ladylike and right. To shield me is an insult.

Preach sister!

Awakenings abound in this fantastic short novel! I loved reading about Lucy's growing conflicting feelings on society's expectations that women are to be protected and informed on how to behave, and her emerging confidence in her own judgement and desire for self determination. I wasn't wooed by the romance in the book. To me, it was Lucy's journey that was captivating. I also abso
...more
Puck
“It is fate that I am here," George persisted, "but you can call it Italy if it makes you less unhappy.”


Now, my art history-excursion to Italy hasn't been as life-changing as the one Lucy took, but it was definitely made better by taking this book with me. A Room with a View is a nice, sweet story about a young woman coming into her own, wherein she learns to stand up for herself, her rights as a woman, and her true love.
Take note, this story was written in 1908, but the lessons that Lucy
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
topics  posts  views  last activity   
The Well-Read Wom...: A Room with a View 1 8 Aug 21, 2020 09:04AM  
2020 Reading Chal...: This topic has been closed to new comments. A Room with a View 9 36 Apr 15, 2020 02:44AM  
Reading 1001: A Room With a View - E.M. Forster 5 24 Dec 30, 2019 03:49PM  
Goodreads Librari...: Page count for ISBN 1444736280 2 14 Aug 18, 2018 07:23PM  
Amor y letras : Libro de junio: Una habitación con vistas 8 15 Aug 11, 2018 12:58AM  

Readers also enjoyed

  • Wives and Daughters
  • Women in Love
  • Pride and Prejudice
  • Daniel Deronda
  • Anne of the Island (Anne of Green Gables, #3)
  • The Brontë Sisters: Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre
  • The Scarlet Pimpernel
  • Our Mutual Friend
  • The Age of Innocence
  • The Wings of the Dove
  • Barnaby Rudge
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, #2)
  • Jane Eyre
  • Emma
  • The Complete Novels
  • Scoop
  • Northanger Abbey
  • Far From the Madding Crowd
See similar books…
2,491 followers
Edward Morgan Forster, generally published as E.M. Forster, was an novelist, essayist, and short story writer. He is known best for his ironic and well-plotted novels examining class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th-century British society. His humanistic impulse toward understanding and sympathy may be aptly summed up in the epigraph to his 1910 novel Howards End: "Only connect".

He had five
...more

Articles featuring this book

Need another excuse to treat yourself to a new book this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day. To create our...
27 likes · 4 comments
“It isn't possible to love and part. You will wish that it was. You can transmute love, ignore it, muddle it, but you can never pull it out of you. I know by experience that the poets are right: love is eternal.” 4185 likes
“We cast a shadow on something wherever we stand, and it is no good moving from place to place to save things; because the shadow always follows. Choose a place where you won't do harm - yes, choose a place where you won't do very much harm, and stand in it for all you are worth, facing the sunshine.” 503 likes
More quotes…