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Frankenstein

3.79  ·  Rating details ·  1,049,437 ratings  ·  27,950 reviews
This book comes with an introduction and notes by Dr Siv Jansson, University of Greenwich. Begun when the author was only eighteen and conceived from a nightmare, Frankenstein, is the deeply disturbing story of a monstrous creation which has terrified and chilled readers since its first publication in 1818. The novel has thus seared its way into the popular imagination while establishi ...more
Paperback, Wordsworth Classics, 173 pages
Published 1993 by Wordsworth Editions (first published 1818)
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Allen Williams I read this book in my senior year of high school and I agree with you 100%. I was quite proud of myself for getting through that book to pass my…moreI read this book in my senior year of high school and I agree with you 100%. I was quite proud of myself for getting through that book to pass my class. Have you seen the movie with Robert Deniro? I thought film critics were way too hard on it. I personally thought it was a very good adaptation and I recommend it. Good luck to you on your schooling. (less)
Kat!e Larson
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Average rating 3.79  · 
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 ·  1,049,437 ratings  ·  27,950 reviews


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Stephen
My apologies, but this review is going to be a bit frantic due to my brain being so oxygen-starved by the novel’s breath-stealing gorgeousness that I'm feeling a bit light-headed. So please forgive the random thoughts.

First: Mary Shelley…I love you!!

Second: Dear Hollywood - you lying dung pile of literature-savaging, no talent hacks…you got this all wrong. Please learn to read and get yourself a copy of the source material before you FUBAR it again.

Third: My heart shattered for the “monster” and I haven’t felt this strong a desire to “hug it out, bitch” sinc/>/>
...more
Emily May
“I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”
-From the 1994 movie

The worst thing about this novel is how distorted it has become by constant movie adaptations and misinformed ideas about the nature of Frankenstein and his "monster". For years, like many others, I thought Frankenstein was the name of that slightly green dude with the bolts in his neck. Nuh-uh.

Did Frankenstein scar
...more
Hannah
No stars. That's right. Zero, zip. nada.

It's been almost 30 years since I've detested a book this much. I didn't think anything could be worse then Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Seems I'm never too old to be wrong. This time, I don't have the excuse that I was forced to read this for high school lit. class. Oh no, this time I read this of my own volition and for fun. Yeah, fun. Kinda like sticking bamboo shoots between my fingernails type of fun. Watching paint dry fun. Going to an Air Supply concert
...more
Anne
So.
I finished it.

Warning:
If you are a fan of classic literature and/or are utterly devoid of a sense of humor this review may not be for you.
Also:
Yes, I realize that I'm a moron with zero literary credibility. So, stop reading right now if the sound of an idiot whistling out of their asshole bothers you too terribly. Sure, you can comment below and tell me how stupid I am, but it probably won't make me a better person. Or will it...?

</i>it.</br>If</span>
  <span id=So.
I finished it.

Warning:
If you are a fan of classic literature and/or are utterly devoid of a sense of humor this review may not be for you.
Also:
Yes, I realize that I'm a moron with zero literary credibility. So, stop reading right now if the sound of an idiot whistling out of their asshole bothers you too terribly. Sure, you can comment below and tell me how stupid I am, but it probably won't make me a better person. Or will it...?

description

I've always wondered what the real Frankenstein story was like...and now I know.
Sadly, sometimes the fantasy is better than the reality.
And the reality is, this book is a big steaming pile of poo.

It's an old-timey horror story, right?
Not so much.
I mean, I wasn't expecting it to actually be scary, but I thought it might be slightly creepy. Unfortunately, the only horror in the story centered around me having to keep turning the pages.
Unless...
Beware mortal! You will DIE of boredom! Oooga-Booga-Booga!
Yep. Truly frightening.

description

It starts like this:
An upper-crust guy sails off to the Arctic to make discoveries, and to pass the time he writes to his sister. Supposedly, he's been sailing around on whaling ships for several years. And he's been proven an invaluable resource by other captains.
So I'm assuming he's a pretty crusty ol' sailor at this point.
Pay attention, because this is where Shelly proves that she knows nothing about men...
So this guy goes on and on in these letters to his sister about how he wishes on every star that he could find a BFF at sea. After a few (too many) letters, they pull a half-frozen Frankensicle out of the water.
Aaaaand here's what our salty sea dog has to say about the waterlogged mad scientist...
"Blah, blah, blah...his full-toned voice swells in my ears; his lustrous eyes dwell on me with all their melancholy sweetness...blah, blah, blah..."
Lustrous eyes?! No (straight) sailor ever, in the history of the world, EVER referred to another dude's eyes as lustrous.
Ever.
And I know what you're thinking.
Well, Anne, maybe this character was gay. Didn't think about that, didja?!
Actually, yes. Yes, I did.
The only problem with that theory is that NONE of the male characters in this book sounded remotely male.
Ladies, do you remember that time in your life (probably around middle or high school), when you thought that guys actually had the same sort of thought waves running through their heads that we do? You know, before you realized that the really don't care about...well, all of the things that we do? You thought that while they were laughing at the booger their idiot friend just flicked across the room, something deeper was stirring in their mind. It just had to be!
I'm not sure when it happens, but at some point, every woman finally realizes the (fairly obvious) truth.
Men aren't women.
That booger was the funniest thing ever, and nothing was stirring around in them other than maybe some gas.
And that's ok.
Fart-lighting and long distance loogie hawking contests aside, they can pretty darn cool.
But this author was too young to realize that.
My personal opinion is that Mary was probably fairly sheltered when it came to real men. She was a teenage girl apparently running around with a bunch of artsy-fartsy dudes. Much like today, I would imagine these junior emos were probably blowing poetic smoke up her young ass in the high hopes of getting into her pants.
Although it's possible I'm totally misreading the situation.

description

Anyway, Frank tells his story, and Sea Dog writes it all down for his sister.
In excruciating detail.
Rivers, flowers, rocks, mountain tops...agonizingly cataloged. And the weather? God forbid a breeze blows through the story without at least a paragraph devoted to the way it felt on his skin or affected his mood!
And speaking of Frankenstein's mood.
I don't think I've ever had the pleasure of reading about a character this spineless before. What a pussy! He didn't talk so much as he whined.
And the swooning!
He was like one of those freaking Fainting Goats!
I can't even count how many times he blacked out and fell over. Of course, then he would get feverish and need "a period of convalescence" to recover.
Again, every episode was recounted with incredible attention to detail.
I'm thrilled that I never had to miss a moment of his sweaty brow getting daubed with water!

Randomly Inserted Fun Fact:
The monster quoted Milton in Paradise Lost.
Shockingly, I only know this because it was in the appendix, and not because I have any real-life experience with reading that one.

description

Was this the most painfully unnecessary book I've read this year?
Yes.
Is there a deeper moral to this story?
Yes.
Some would say, that the monster is a product of a society that refuses to accept someone who is different. Or maybe that Victor Frankenstein was the real monster for not realizing that he had a duty to parent and care for his creation? Perhaps it is meant to point out our obsession with perfection, and our willingness to disregard people who don't meet the standards of beauty as non-human?
Some might say any of those things.
I , however, learned a far different lesson from Frankenstein.
And it's this...
Trust no one.
Not even someone who (just an example) has been your Best Friend for decades!
Let's read a classic, Anne. It'll be fun, Anne. We can call each other with updates, Anne. It'll be just like a book club, Anne. Tee-hee!
Liar, liar! Pants on fire!
I read this whole God-awful book, and you quit after 10 pages!
I'm telling your mom!

Anyway.
Here's the quote that sums up my experience with Frankenstein:

"Blah, blah, blah...in all the misery I imagined and dreaded, I did not conceive the hundredth part of the anguish I was destined to endure."

description
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Bill Kerwin

It's been fifty years since I had read Frankenstein, and, now—after a recent second reading—I am pleased to know that the pleasures of that first reading have been revived. Once again--just as it was in my teens--I was thrilled by the first glimpse of the immense figure of the monster, driving his sled across the arctic ice, and marveled at the artful use of narrative frames within frame, each subsequent frame leading us closer to the heart of the novel, until we hear the alienated yet articulate voice of th
...more
Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)
This was awesome. I listened to an audiobook on YouTube (as it is under the public domain). You can find it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuyEa.... It was great. The narrator did a great job of building the atmosphere and excitement in the story. I always love reading the original stories behind some very iconic pop culture figures. Frankenstein is obviously incredibly popular. It was great to read and do a little bit of a personal independent study on (major nerd here). The perfect Halloween read!
Sean Barrs the Bookdragon
"My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid, to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment. My companion will be of the same nature as myself, and will be content with the same fare. We shall make our bed of dried leaves; the sun will shine on us as on man, and will ripen our food. The picture I present to you is peaceful and human.”

The Creature’s diet is unmistakably vegetarian. Vegetarianism becomes a way for the creature to renounce his creator by
...more
Matthew
Mar 06, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Fans of classics
REREAD UPDATE - September 2018:

One of my bookclubs (Click to check out Reading List Completists) is reading this for September 2018. I figure it was a good time for a reread since it was one of my favorites and it has been over 20 years since I read it.

I did enjoy it again this time and it stands up to the 5 star review and designation of classic. There were a few slow parts - mainly when Dr. Frankenst
...more
Leonard Gaya
Dec 18, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
The anecdote is legendary: Mary Shelley, a teenager at the time, was spending a vacation in Switzerland with her fiancé, Percy Shelley, their mutual friend, Lord Byron, and a few other people. Was the weather gloomy that summer of 1816? Were the companions bored to death? For amusement, one evening, they challenged each other into writing the scariest ghost story they could come up with. No one remembers what the fellows wrote on that occasion. Everyone has, at least, heard of the creation of th ...more
Raeleen Lemay
Nov 09, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was such a nice surprise! I've been meaning to read this book for AGES, and I've built it up in my head as this super dry, boring book, but boy was I ever wrong. This book is juuuust about 200 years old, yet it feels incredibly timeless, more than many other classics I've read. It was so interesting, and the character of Frankenstein's monster was so tragic (and he can speak! I didn't see that coming thanks to Hollywood ruining the image of "Frankenstein") that there just wasn't time to be ...more
Warwick
I have a favourite Kate Beaton strip framed up in our book room:


(Full-size image here.)

Mary was – what? – eighteen years old when she went on this famous holiday to Lake Geneva with Percy Bysshe Shelley and Byron and Byron's physician. She was calling herself ‘Mrs Shelley’, though they had not yet married – Percy was still married to someone else.

The surroundings were familiar. The last time Mary and Pclass="gr-hostedUserImg">
(Full-size
...more
Hannah Greendale
Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend.



A sorrowful tale of lost love and self-loathing conveyed with divine prose.
Elise (TheBookishActress)
Frankenstein follows Victor, a scientist on a mission to create new life from old carcasses – until his plan, of course, backfires. What ensues is perhaps fairly well-known in popular culture: the killing of his brother, the framing of his tutor, Justine, and the murder of his wife Elizabeth. With the help of his wife, Elizabeth, and his loving family, he must find a way to save not only his family, but his soul.

It is amazing that such a basic plot, written in literally 1818, can be so compelling and so subversive.

I DIDN'T
...more
Kevin Kuhn
Jun 30, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
In the early 1800’s the author Percy B. Shelley, the poet Lord Byron, and Percy’s wife, Mary Shelley, challenged each other as to who could write the best horror story. Mary Shelley won (to put it mildly) by creating one of the earlier gothic horror novels. Some also consider ‘Frankenstein’ to be one of the earliest Science Fiction novels. H.G. Wells and Jules Verne didn’t come along until the late 1800’s.

I’m astonished when I think that this work was written and published over 200 y
...more
Alejandro
Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.

Well, finally I read the original novel after watching infinite film adaptations, variations of the theme and even odd approaches to the topic.

I was sure that I would enjoy a lot the novel but sadly, compelled to write an honest review, I have to say that barely I was able to give it a 3-star rating, that I think it's the fairest rating that I can give to the book.

The original premise is astonishing, the following impact in populpowerful.
...more
mark monday
...and so I was born! A man, and not a man; a life, and an un-life. Hair and lips of lustrous black, skin of parchment yellow, watery eyes of dun-colored white. The stature of a giant. A horror among men! And so my creator fled me, horrified of his creation. And so I fled my place of birth, to seek lessons amongst the human kind. My lonesome lessons learnt: man is a loving and noble creature; learning is pathway to beauty, to kindness, to fellowship. And this I also learnt: to witness what diffe ...more
F
I read this years ago and Loved it!
Great story and will need to read again soon.

2016 - Listened to the audiobook version and loved it.
Trevor
Feb 26, 2008 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: literature
I don’t really know what I was expecting – though ‘more’ comes to mind. Let’s start with what I liked about this book. I liked the idea that the monster is ‘made’ a monster by the treatment he receives from humanity. He is ugly and humanity does like to punish the ugly - this is a universal truth about us that in itself is also fairly ugly.

The other thing I liked was that standard ploy of gothic novels – the multiple Chinese whisper narration. In this the story is all written in a se
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
Frankestein = The Modern Prometheus, Mary Shelley
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment.
تاریخ نخستین خوانش: نخستین خوانش: هشتم ماه دسامبر سال 1995 میلادی و سپس دومین بار در روز نوزدهم ماه نوامبر سال 2011 میلادی
عنوان: فرانکشتاین (پرومته مدرن) ؛ نویسنده: مری شلی؛ مترجم: جعفر مدر
...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, Mary Shelley
Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel written by English author Mary Shelley (1797–1851) that tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque, sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition of the novel was published anonymously in London on 1 January 1818, when she was 20. Her name first appeared on the second edi
...more
J.G. Keely
If you have not read the book, then you do not know Frankenstein or his monster. Certainly, there is a creature in our modern mythology which bears that name, but he bears strikingly little resemblance to the original.

It is the opposite with Dracula, where, if you have seen the films, you know the story. Indeed, there is a striking similarity between nearly all the Dracula films, the same story being told over and over again: Harker, bug-eating Renfield, doting Mina, the seduction of Lucy, Dr. Van
...more
Praveen
Oct 20, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Goodreads, Oct 20, 20__

TO Mr. Frankenstein,

"Oh, Frankenstein! Generous and self-devoted being! What does it avail that I now ask thee to pardon me."

Dear Frankenstein ! 
When your monster said these lines in the last, I asked myself also why did you behold the accomplishment of your toil on that dreary night of November !

Yes ! He repented !
..But your creation did not remorse before he had urged his diabolical vengeance to such an extremity.

...more
Lisa
“Die ich rief, die Geister,
Werd ich nun nicht los!”

Goethe’s Zauberlehrling (The Sorcerer’s Apprentice) experiences a deluge of misery when he tries to imitate the magic of his master, and to set the world in motion himself. Starting out with childish and irresponsible experimental joy, he is lost until the sorcerer comes home and uses his superior magic to restore order.

Frankenstein, unfortunately, does not have a superior power to rely on when he sets free a creature of his own immatur
...more
Matt
Oct 26, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: audiobook
An annual re-read worth reviewing once again.

Mary Shelley’s story of Frankenstein poses less the spooky and bone-chilling tale that it has received in subsequent permutations, but rather serves more as a warning in regards to scientific exploration. The novel opens with a set of letters by Captain Robert Walton to his sister back in England. Captain Walton is travelling through the Arctic to further his scientific appetite. The captain and crew notice a large creature travelling over
...more
Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
Thank you to my friend Matthew for this wonderful book & my Deadpool for our partner gift giving!

A great book and wonderful cover!



Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾
Henry Avila
Victor Frankenstein, the discouraged scientist reveals his horrific secrets on board a ship exploring the Arctic Ocean (The old dream of a northwest passage), being rescued from an ice flow, he fears that no one will believe his story of creating a "monster", that viciously kills in the late 1700's ...who would ? At first the leader of the rugged crew the skeptical Captain Robert Walton, thinks Frankenstein is insane, after all, Victor was found with a dog sled in the middle of the rough, angry ...more
Whitney Atkinson
WOW.

One of the most powerful books I have ever read that speaks so much about compassion and humanity. I feel on the verge of tears, it was so moving. This is like Phantom of the Opera times a thousand. And I love POTO.
Michael
Jul 04, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites
Published first in 1818, and again in an altered form in 1831, Frankenstein at its core is a story about the breakdown of sympathy: both versions of the gothic thriller associate the source of oppressive bonds and human misery with the inability to take pity upon another body's suffering. The novel's lush descriptions, ornate sentences, and sensational plot obscure the fact that it consists of three interwoven main narratives that all end in isolation, namely Walton's letters to his sister and the stories o ...more
Apatt
It is almost a pity that the story of Frankenstein is so well known because far too many people neglect to bother reading Mary Shelley’s novel under the assumption that they already know the story. This is a shame because Frankenstein is beautifully written, very dark and scary but also quite poignant.

Most people have an image of Frankenstein’s Monster as a shambling massive thing with bolts on its neck, going around mumbling GAAHHH GAAAAAH!!! and snapping people’s necks because that is how he rolls. Some people even
...more
Umut Reviews
Well, what can I say, I'm totally blown away with this piece of literature.

I haven't picked up this book because of all the information we're exposed to it. The green monster in the movies, the horror adaptations of the story, it's always on the Halloween reading lists.
I mean, how did it become so distorted from what it actually is?

Diminishing this book to a horror concept is a literary crime, because this book is a beautifully written, heart-wrenching story of a guy called Frankenstein and t
...more
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Mary Shelley (née Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, often known as Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley) was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, travel writer, and editor of the works of her husband, Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. She was the daughter of the political philosopher William Godwin and the writer, philosopher, and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft.

Mary Shelley was taken seriously a
...more
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“Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.” 4410 likes
“Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.” 3840 likes
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