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And the Walls Come Crumbling Down

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4.19  ·  Rating details ·  157 ratings  ·  21 reviews
In 2003, a young woman leaves home without telling her family that she is not coming back. She spends the next six years moving from house to house and living hand-to- mouth; at first with her lover, and then alone.

And The Walls Come Crumbling Down parallels three events in the author’s life: the physical deterioration of the house in which she lives, the emotional disinte
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Paperback, First Edition, 132 pages
Published April 2016 by Math Paper Press
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Average rating 4.19  · 
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 ·  157 ratings  ·  21 reviews


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Roy Llh
Jul 31, 2016 rated it really liked it
The style and theme of the book was is reminiscent of Jeanette Winterson's earlier efforts - poetic and airy while serving up a harsh dose of identity crisis. Would love for the last third of the book to stretch out even more to be more aligned to the pace of the first two thirds. Overall, really enjoyable.
erica
Wow, this book was stunning and incredibly well-crafted as a creative non-fiction memoir. This book digs deeply into themes of home, belonging, and displacement through the intimate perspective of a queer multiracial woman in Singapore. The author intricately weaves together pieces of writing which are poetic, vivid, and both politically and personally resonant. As someone who has never travelled to Singapore before, this book provided an opportunity to consider what it might be like to experien ...more
Eileen Ying
Aug 06, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
3.5
Apple Nocom
Jul 16, 2016 rated it really liked it
"Coming home to someone is many things. It is a literal action, an abstract idea, a physical feeling. It is more than the sound of the key turning in the door and the voice that calls from the porch. It is a choice, a promise, a declaration. It is a return, not as a person to a place, but as oneself to another. It is one person saying to another: You are the one I choose."

To appreciate this, you have to embrace that it is more poetry than prose. Fragmented, poignant and haunted. It winds a bit t
...more
Angelin
Jan 11, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Finished the book in one seating and was once again amazed by Tania's intimate yet controlled writing. So honest, raw, angry, and refined, all at the same time. It finds its way to the deepest parts of your mind and soul. Loved it - Termites, underground houses, and broken love - everything about it.
Judith Huang
Shades of Jeanette Winterson in Rozario's poetic prose - sometimes discursive, always thoughtful and imaginative. Beautiful writing, and I actually preferred it to tender delirium ( though that was also good). The lost relationship threaded through the book haunts you even when you've put the book away, like a trace of something bitter in the mouth.
David
May 28, 2016 rated it it was ok
A decent enough if dull, diaristic and self-indulgent chapbook on houses, moving and belonging. You get the feeling that the author has nothing particularly original to share.
Maria Ella
I, uh, honestly don't know what to say.
If rumination is this long, then please stop, because that was one rollercoaster ride.

There are thoughts that make you feel incomplete. There are thoughts that are measured and too short, you look for more. I don't make sense (in this review), do I?

Anyways, I appreciate the work. At the first few chapters, I felt the somber mood of heartbreaks, and being trapped and jaded and lost. However, there are times when I felt off at the latter pages -- there are
...more
Wei Jun
Jun 20, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: 2020
Raw and honest. Enjoyable short read. Themes on sexual orientation in context with our current society, journey of self acceptance and self discovery through tribulations, impactful story telling of minority or marginalised groups.

Written in 2016, her stories still carry its weight especially so in 2020.
p h o b o s  ☾
Jul 09, 2020 rated it it was amazing
I'm so glad I decided to take a chance and pick up this book.

De Rozario's writing may be one of the most beautiful I've encountered and is exactly the kind of poetic prose I've been looking for.

Absolutely beautiful read with so many powerful messages. This is definitely a book that can be re-digested again and again.
Chu
Jun 12, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: queer-beans
An ode to the heartaches of growth. The writing was raw, honest, and tentative. Reading this memoir was such an intimate experience for me. The fragility of home reverberates in the wake of her voice.
Jarel
Jun 16, 2020 rated it really liked it
its simple, unpretentious and universal -- there's an inexplicable rawness to Tania De Rozario's writing that makes every page that much more riveting and delicious. It was one of the first SingLit books that I bought from BooksActually, and I am not disappointed.
Adrian Wong
Oct 05, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Fucking phenomenal.
Esther
Dec 30, 2017 rated it it was amazing
so beautifully honest, raw, poignant and cutting, it hits something deep inside you straight to the core.
Navya
Dec 03, 2019 rated it really liked it
Well-written and poetic
OK
Jul 19, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: memoir-cnf, qtbipoc
Something about the writing didn’t click for me. While I occasionally liked the home metaphor (stairs as ancestry - nice), most of the time it felt tired or overused (crumbling walls, roofs, basements, etc). I found myself skimming a lot. There were a few gorgeous passages but the prose felt quite forced.

3/5
Jason Lundberg
The full version of my official blurb on the back of the book:

"Tania De Rozario is a marvel. Her writing evokes the same feeling as when I first discovered the music of Trent Reznor, with words raw and biting, but above all honest. In this truly remarkable memoir, she lays bare the emotional turmoil and heartbreak that comes from multiple betrayals: by the stroke that steals her grandmother's voice, by the righteous religiosity that forces her mother to choose intolerant belief over parental lov
...more
Sakshi  J
Jul 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
this is a gorgeous collection of prose that takes you through the process of shifting house multiple times. to me, however, most of all it was about the difference between a house and a home. everything from the writing to how each piece, each story was tied into the other, completely blew me away. how every trauma and every heartbreak became such a beautiful metaphor for shifting and moving and leaving, left me breathless, honestly. the piece "walls" has forever made a special place in my heart ...more
neha
Apr 15, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: favorites, qreads
Tania De Rozario's poetic prose is beautiful, raw and thought-provoking. Her intimate and unique writing style is a delight to read and has really piqued my interest in creative non-fiction, and I finished this book craving to read and know more.
Suningk
Jun 16, 2016 rated it liked it
Shelves: own
Very thematically cogent. But narrative felt curtailed, like it didn't know how to end itself (could mean in some way oddly symbolic but nah)—that was what troubled me
Sasha
Jul 20, 2016 rated it really liked it
So beautiful
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Tania De Rozario is a writer and visual artist engaged with issues of gender, sexuality, home, memory, and representations of women in Horror. She is the author of Tender Delirium (2013), And The Walls Come Crumbling Down (2016), and Somewhere Else, Another You (2018), all published by Math Paper Press. She was the 2011 winner of Singapore’s Golden Point Award for English Poetry, and the 2020 winn ...more

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“Coming home to someone is many things. It is a literal action, an abstract idea, a physical feeling. It is more than the sound of the key turning in the door and the voice that calls from the porch. It is a choice, a promise, a declaration. It is a return, not as a person to a place, but as oneself to another. It is one person saying to another person: You are the one I choose.” 5 likes
“Platitudes are poor substitutes for emotions, this negative space hollowed out and without words. I know the shape of you and it has no name. I know the sound of you and the smell of you and the touch and sight and taste of you. But language departed the same day you did, leaving my mouth empty.” 4 likes
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