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Why I Am so Clever

3.24  ·  Rating details ·  709 ratings  ·  85 reviews

'Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?'

Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings from Ecce Homo, the last work iconoclastic German philosopher Nietzsche wrote before his descent into madness.

One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives re

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Kindle Edition, Penguin Little Black Classics, 57 pages
Published March 3rd 2016 by Penguin Classics
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Average rating 3.24  · 
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 ·  709 ratings  ·  85 reviews


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JK
Jul 27, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
What a blast of self-awareness and ego from Nietzsche here. If I had half of the man’s knowledge, I’d be living a very good life.

Broken into three sections on why Nietzsche is so wise, so clever, and why he writes such good books, this collection reads almost like a diatribe on how Nietzsche is so bloody cool. It’s quite self-aggrandising, and good tickle of his own ego, but impressive nonetheless. The man is unbelievably intelligent, yet this became old quite quickly.

It’s quite a slog to get th
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Tosh
Mar 12, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-bought
Friedrich Nietzsche as a bite-size tasty piece of food. The public perception of him and his work is very wrong. One thinks of him as being uber-Nazi, but the fact is he's not that fond of Germany or German culture, and on top of that, although he's a fan of Wagner, there is much in his work that he's not fond of. This little book consists of three sections: "Why I am So Wise," "Why I am so Clever," and "Why I Write Such Good Books." Which by title alone shows off his sense of humor. These piece ...more
Peter
My first experience of Nietzsche and in conclusion...

A pompus arrogant man who is crazier than a sackful of cats.

YIKES!
Kaju Janowski
Dec 14, 2016 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: ppl who like to praise their own selfs
Recommended to Kaju by: small bookshop in corners of Edinburgh
gibberish interleaved with genius ideas of a self-important madman, who seems not to know if he would appreciate my disdain or my occasional understanding more.
Had hard time rating -- I wouldn't recommend this monkey talk to anyone, but I'm glad I've read it at the same time.
Anka Räubertochter
Let me sum this collection up for you: Nietzsche is the smartest person in the world, Germans are dumb and eat awful food, and women are inferior to men and want to be oppressed.
Marta :}
Dec 22, 2019 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: books-i-own
Pretty sure I wouldn't have bothered with this one after 20 pages if it wasn't a gift.
Hikaoru
Jun 16, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Bought it for a laugh. I mean, look at the title. Joke's on me. It was a collosal waste of time. He's full of himself and sexist to boot. Goodbye Nietzche, may your work never cross my path.
Lone Wong
Dec 30, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
This book essays and writing is a selection taken from his album, "Ecce Homo" before Friedrich Nietzsche descent into madness. And perhaps it is his last piece of notable work of his life.

"On this perfect day, when everything has become ripe and not only the grapes are growing brown, a ray of sunlight has fallen on to my life: I looked behind me, I looked before me, never have I seen so many and such good things together. Not in vain have I buried my forty-fourth year today, I was entitled t
...more
Michelle
Oct 03, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well that was entertaining! I'm still not sure exactly what he hoped to achieve in this small volume. Was is meant to be humorous? Was it meant to be serious? I just don't know. But I know I enjoyed it! I recently read Jordan Petersen's '12 Rules for Life' and it reminded me a bit of that for a few reasons, not least of which is his arrogant and superior tone (incidentally I loved that book too!). Nietzsche gave the Germans and Christians a fair whack. Considering he was German himself (although ...more
Anastasia Bodrug
Jul 30, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Câteva din pasajele care mi-au plăcut:

• Thinking of yourself as a destiny, not wanting to be 'other' than you are -that is under such circumstances the highest wisdom".

• To become what one is, one must not have the faintest idea what one is.

• To live alone one must be animal or a god - says Aristotel. There is yet a third case: one must be both - a philosopher.
Deir Zahrani
Mar 25, 2017 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: wisdom
"Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings" explains exactly what's inside this book. English is not my first language, and I'm not very good at it. So you can imagine how hard it was for me to read such a book, written by the one that can be said as the greatest mind of all time. Reading this book, I feel like I had the chance to peek what's inside his head, through the keyhole. It explained how he loved books, Wagner, anything French perhaps, and despised anything Germans I g ...more
Tyler
Jul 18, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Pure madness presented through addictive prose. Nietzsche even warns that his books may disturb sleep and he is right to do so, this book is tough to put down, even if the messages seem bipolar and confused at times
Ramadevi
Apr 29, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Weird flex but okay.
Marjolein
Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com

Every week I read one Little Black Classic and this week's is Nietzsche supposedly self-mocking autobiography.

I can be quick. To me, I found it less self-mocking and more like a man who is rather full of himself. Sure, he is exaggerating and it shows, but with this kind of snub undertones that go on to make it painfully clear he actually beliefs he is that clever.

Either that, or I just didn't understand a thing of what he was trying t
...more
Julia Larsen
Mar 20, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Clearly at the last stages of his megalomania with his humor still intact. An uplifting read, and unlike what the title conveys, not too arrogant but rather motivating and insightful. Almost like a manual to living a slightly crazy but off-the-ground existence. Kept it in my bag for weeks to read whenever I felt a bit down.
Alexandru
Oct 03, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Nietzsche being a troll close to his death. A good book for those considering Nietzsche a Nazi, since he mentions that he feels Polish and makes fun of German culture, describing it as a non-culture. A book about everything - cusine and French being the best one, music, dead father, mother and hated sister. A short and interesting journey into the ending life of a crazy philosopher.
phazleeanna
"It also seems to me that the rudest word, the rudest letter are more good-natured, more honest than silence. Those who keep silent almost always lack subtlety and politeness of the heart; silence is an objection, swallowing down necessarily produces a bad character - it even ruins the stomach."
Sander
Nov 12, 2019 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
The epitome of arrogance (how much of it is really satirical?). This book contains some interesting ideas and quotes but isn’t really worth the effort overall. It does show the extreme intelligence (and sexism) of Nietzsche though.
Bebedele
Maybe I'm not clever enough to understand this book.
Gustavo Garcia
Mar 05, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
A book that will demand full concentration and a lot of patience. Worth it once you understand its underlayers.
Catherine Vamianaki
A bit difficult to understand but it is worth reading it
Arnija
May 21, 2020 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Never have I ever read a book this short, yet never have I ever wanted a book to end faster..
Mary
Sep 15, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
word of caution before reading this self-celebrating autobiography, do not take this seriously. good read if you want a good laugh, bad read if you can't take sarcasm.
Pedro
Dec 23, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: philosophy
Favourite passages:

It also seems to me that the rudest word, the rudest letter are more good-natured, more honest than silence. Those who keep silent almost always lack subtlety and politeness of the heart; silence is an objection, swallowing down necessarily produces a bad character, it even ruins the stomach. All those given to silence are dyspeptic. One will see that I would not like to see rudeness undervalued, it is the most humane form of contradiction by far and, in the midst of modern te
...more
Giulia Galbarini
Aug 17, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be other than it is, not in the future, not in the past, not in all eternity.”
Valentina
I liked it and I thought it was funny except for the bit where he explains his anti-feminist views. Too bad my dude, a woman was just reading your book, you probably don't like that fact.
Fu Sheng Wilson Wong
In this self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writing, Nietzsche in summary, expresses his distaste for the Germans, his love of Wagner (and all things French) and knots of logic and irony.

He touches on how selective he is with nurturing and nourishment of his mind and soul and that he "ate badly" from "German food" and that has led to "indigestion".

He also critiques the "LIES from the bad instincts of sick" (being all the concepts 'God', 'soul', 'virtue', 'sin', 'the Beyond', 'tr
...more
Books By Hala
Jan 18, 2018 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This was amongst my first purchases of the Little Black Classics series from @penguinclassics which I love. It was my brief and easy way to start with #Nietzsche who was always intimidating to me (I knew I was cheating myself). This supposedly comic and simple book is compiled from the author’s last book “Ecce Homo” which he wrote before he went insane. The content is Self-celebrating and self-mocking but it actually turns out to be extremely hard and typical Nietzsche. I think this was his exa ...more
Vlad
Feb 18, 2017 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
I honestly had to use a thesaurus to write this. Self-importance, pride, vanity, pompousness, grandiosity, conceit and so much more. This is basically a twelve-year-olds idea of writing an analysis of intelligence.

Full of so many logical fallacies that it would take an army of logicians to fix it, correlation understood as causality, and so much self-aggrandizing. The dash of sexism at the end pushed it to one star.

Really this is my first experience with Nietzsche, and having known a bit about h
...more
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Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a German philosopher of the late 19th century who challenged the foundations of Christianity and traditional morality. He was interested in the enhancement of individual and cultural health, and believed in life, creativity, power, and the realities of the world we live in, rather than those situated in a world beyond. Central to his philosophy is the idea of “life- ...more

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