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The Weight of Feathers

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3.80  ·  Rating details ·  4,702 ratings  ·  1,068 reviews
A finalist for the William C. Morris YA Debut Award, Anna-Marie McLemore's The Weight of Feathers is an utterly captivating young adult novel by a talented new voice.

For twenty years, the Palomas and the Corbeaus have been rivals and enemies, locked in an escalating feud for over a generation. Both families make their living as traveling performers in competing shows-the PalomasMcLemore's
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Paperback, 320 pages
Published March 28th 2017 by A Thomas Dunne Book for St. Martin's Griffin (first published September 15th 2015)
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Sonnet Fitzgerald The main characters all have physical characteristics that define them: scales or feathers that grow from their scalp. A big part of the story is how…moreThe main characters all have physical characteristics that define them: scales or feathers that grow from their scalp. A big part of the story is how they have to hide these deformities from others, or show them in ways that identify them to their "tribe." In addition, the main character has feathers that are the wrong color, a source of shame to him and violence from his family for being broken.

It's not a disability in the ways we think of disability, but there are strong parallels. I'd definitely recommend this book for anyone struggling to accept their "flaws."(less)
Ezri There is mild swearing in Spanish and French. definitely none of the "seven words you can't say on TV' ala George Carlin though.

as far as…more
There is mild swearing in Spanish and French. definitely none of the "seven words you can't say on TV' ala George Carlin though.

as far as sexual content, no not really. there are scenes with kissing and touch between the main characters, but the most graphic it really ever gets is descriptions of Lace's breasts when she's swimming topless, and Cluck's imagining touching them.(less)
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C.G. Drews
This book is so insufferably beautiful I don't even know what to do with myself?!? Laugh? Cry? Hug it? Stand upon a rooftop and shout about my affections? Duct tape the cover to my face so I can always be with it????? Honestly I'm so picky about books these days but this JUST STOLE MY HEART AND TICKED ALL THE RIGH BOXES AND I HAVE SO MANY EMOTIONS I'M EXHAUSTED.

It's already going on my "best of the year shelf" and I'm buying everything by this author ever.

WHAT ARE MY EMOTIONS DOING I DON'T EVE
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karen
He held a wet palm to her cheek. "I don't want you getting hurt."

"Everybody gets hurt," she said. "You know that."


this isn't the most "me" of all books, but i can definitely see its appeal for people who enjoyed books like Beautiful Creatures or The Night Circus or other stories featuring star-crossed lovers from feuding families with a fantasy/magical slant.

i snagged this one from netgalley because i liked the cover, i'd been hearing good things about it, and i've had good luck with circussy books so far this year (He held a wet palm to her cheek. "I don't want you getting hurt."

"Everybody gets hurt," she said. "You know that."


this isn't the most "me" of all books, but i can definitely see its appeal for people who enjoyed books like
Beautiful Creatures or The Night Circus or other stories featuring star-crossed lovers from feuding families with a fantasy/magical slant.

i snagged this one from netgalley because i liked the cover, i'd been hearing good things about it, and i've had good luck with circussy books so far this year (Church of Marvels, The Book of Speculation). plus, a boy with feathers growing under his hair?? that made me recall the heartbreaking feather-based magical realism of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender, so i was sold! but this one definitely falls heavy on the "romance" side of the genre-spectrum, which is not a side i have ever been thrilled to find myself.

but if that's your bag, you may enjoy this one.

it's about two families: the french-romani corbeaus and the spanish palomas (avian imagery abounds), who are competing groups of traveling performers, independent of a circus or carnival. the corbeaus don giant wings constructed of wire and peacock feathers and climb trees and dance through the branches like bird-fairies while the palomas wear iridescent tails and perform in the water as sirenas, or mermaids. the families are extremely insular and superstitious and they each have specific genetic anomalies - the corbeaus grow feathers at the base of their hairline while the palomas have a scattering of scales somewhere on their bodies.

the two families have been at odds ever since an event twenty years in the past resulted in a death from each family; deaths each family blamed on the other. their feud has been sustained for all these years, with each generation being cautioned against physical contact with their enemies - to touch a member of the other family, or in some cases, to be touched by something the family owns, is to become cursed, unclean, and measures have to be taken to cleanse the taint.

-Fighting was the only safe way to touch a Paloma. Half this family believed if they ever let a Paloma brush their arm or bump their shoulder, they'd wither and die like wildflowers in July sun. But fighting was safe. The rage made it true and good. The anger and honor of defending this family shielded them like a saint's prayer. Hitting and kicking were safe. Anything else could bring sickness.

-Lace knew the danger of touching a Corbeau. Her abuela said she'd be better off petting a rattlesnake. But these feathers were not the Corbeaus' skin. They didn't hold the same poison as a Corbeau's body.

sabotage has also occurred over the years - petroleum jelly smeared on tree branches or nets placed in the water, which have resulted in injuries on both sides.

so what happens when a paloma girl and a corbeau boy meet and fall in love? why, this book is what happens.

almendro is the town where their conflict began, and it is the sole point of overlap between the families' tour route each year. it is in this town where fate puts cluck corbeau in the path of lace paloma. neither of them realize at first that they are from enemy camps, but once they do, it is too late - sparks have flown, attraction been cemented. both cluck and lace already had tricky relationships with the rest of their families (cluck much more so) and this relationship, when it is discovered, further complicates their standings within their families. sides are taken, accusations fly, and secrets kept for twenty years are exposed. the prominent themes are loyalty and pride, family and love, and the way grudges can be sustained and the past manipulated and ingrained into family lore to justify animosity.

each chapter opens with an aphorism in either french or spanish, translated into english below. the novel itself is peppered with french and spanish phrases, also largely untranslated. naturally, i loved the frenchy bits - both the language and the little jabs at my peeeeeeeople:

-…Lace's mother told her that tourists probably couldn't even take their children to the Corbeaus' show. "They're French," she said. "I bet they take their clothes off halfway through."

and

"You're blushing," she said. "I thought you were French."

"Not that kind of French."


the romance elements are more strongly developed than the magical ones - i still don't really understand WHY cluck has feathers or what lace's mermaid-scales do, other than "that's how this particular family is identified." neither the feathers nor the scales have magical powers that enable the families to perform their acts - they still need to construct theatrical elements to wow the crowds and they can't fly or breathe underwater, so their presence is strictly cosmetic and narratively extraneous, especially since they go to such great lengths to conceal these marks.

the palomas …used …plastic coins, sheer as beach glass, to cover their birthmarks. Their escalas were not some spectacle to be displayed in the show. Apanchanej, the river goddess who had blessed them with their love for water, had given them these marks, and they were not to flaunt them.

while …the blond Corbeaus coated their dark feathers in flour, to hide them. The show was all costumes and peacock feathers, lights hung in trees, tightrope walking. La magie of their bodies did not belong to the gadje, the people who were not like them.

there's no reason this story couldn't have been told without those elements, except that it adds a little fantasy zest to the love story.

and the love story itself is sweet, if you are a fan of romance, but there's such an overemphasis upon smells and tastes, especially of salt, it started to annoy me. everything is salt. if you don't believe me, here is a sampling.

He left the taste of black salt on her mouth. The woody flavor of charcoal. The sugar and acid of citrus peel. The soft metal of iron.

she has a preternaturally sophisticated palate, this one.

later, …the taste of violet-black salt still under her tongue.
and They carried the violet and ash scent of black salt.
and Her tail reminded him of raw pink salt.
and The metal-and-earth scent of violet-black salt.
and The black salt smell of his hair and sweat.
and She wanted to remember how he smelled, the salt and the cottonwood bark.

oh my god, enough with the salt already!!

there's also a repetitive emphasis on white and black, la magia negra/la magie noire, crow and dove. i'm not sure why there was so much bird imagery on the paloma side, since their performance has nothing to do with birds or flight. or why mclemore didn't just use a white aquatic bird like a swan if she wanted to get all birdy. unless "cisne" is not a credible surname.

but that's just me being complainy. i did enjoy a lot of the writing, especially when it was focused on the fact that these two characters were so damaged, physically and emotionally. i thought this was lovely:

It hurt, his hands on her burns. It stung like a hot shower, pins of water and steam stabbing in. She was ready for it. The sting reminded her she was a body knitting itself back together. It was why she liked his hands on her. His wrecked fingers knew how to handle something ruined.

and overall, it's well-written, but i value strong world-building over fantasy romance, so this one wasn't my particular cuppa. romance fans - clamber aboard, fantasy fans - catch the next one.

come to my blog!
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Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
I have a feeling I'm gonna get trolled for giving this one two stars.


I'm going to admit I am not cool enough for this book.


Shut up little Emo boy. I'm the cool mom. I bribe my kids to say so.

So you have Palomas and the Corbeaus families. They are both traveling performing families. They hate each other. I mean loathe each other.
The Paloma's act is the women are the mermaids in the show and they best do their job
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❄️Nani❄️
2.75⭐

I was initially sold on this when someone compared it to The Night Circus. It was nothing like the Night Circus. Aside from the fact that both are magical realism and involve a travelling circus crew, they couldn't be further apart.

I'm having trouble understanding my own feelings on this book so I’ll try my best to come across… understandable.

So, the story is about two rival families, the Palomas and the Corbeaus, who have been rivals and enemies locked in an escalating feud for over a generatio
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Aimee ♥ | Aimee, Always
more by anna-marie mclemore:
when the moon was ours


5 Words to Describe The Weight of Feathers

1.) Engaging (adj.): very attractive or pleasing in a way that holds your attention.

"One does not wed hens with foxes."


You all know how much I hate flowery prose, but Anna-Marie McLemore made me fall in love with it. This book just had the perfect blend of easy-to-read and elegant writing. I mean, you could tell that the author writes some kick-ass prose that's still totally comprehensible and engaging.

It was really/>"One/>1.)Describe
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Elise (TheBookishActress)
Why her?
Because it was hard to make her laugh, and harder to scare her.

When I finish a magical realism book, I always feel as if I enjoyed it, but I can never quite articulate why. If I struggled to push through a book, can I even say I enjoyed it? I've had the same experience with books like Maggie Stiefvater's The Scorpio Races and Moira Fowley-Doyle's The Accident Season. and I think I've come to the conclusion that this genre requires a certain mood out of its readers. While you can appreciate the
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Darth J
Sep 22, 2015 marked it as could-not-finish  ·  review of another edition
DNF @ page 100

The Weight of Distracting Purple Prose


This book is nothing like The Night Circus!!! Stahp comparing it.

So we have 2 warring family of traveling performers. One swims in fake fish tails and pretends to be mermaids, while the other wears wings and does some tightrope act. Here's the twist: the "mermaid" family actually has some scales on their skin and the other family has feathers growing out of theirs.


There's supposedly some dark magic here but100
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Elyse (retired from reviewing/semi hiatus) Walters
WOW... A Fantastical Tale!!!!! Just yesterday, I was high as a kite reading "Haroun and the Sea of Stories", by Salman Rushdie...(a Children's magical fairy tale), and
today, I'm swooning over "The Weight of Feathers, ( debut by Anna-Marie LeLemore).
This novel has a tribal feeling such as in "The Round House", by Louise Erdrich, to me with
and inventive cast of characters and scenes. It has a Romeo and Juliet feeling to it also by the
fact that two teens fall in love - but their families h
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Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
3.5 stars. Review first posted on www.fantasyliterature.com:

The Romeo and Juliet story is updated with a few twists in Anna-Marie McLemore’s debut young adult fantasy novel, The Weight of Feathers, published September 15, 2015. Two rival families travel between small towns in California in a nostalgic setting that seems to be approximately the 1960s, performing their Cirque du Soleil-type acts for the townspeople.

The French Romani Corbeaus (“Ravens”) attach wings made of wire and feathers to their bodies and perform acrobatics in the treetops.
3.5 stars. Review first posted on www.fantasyliterature.com:

The Romeo and Juliet story is updated with a few twists in Anna-Marie McLemore’s debut young adult fantasy novel, The Weight of Feathers, published September 15, 2015. Two rival families travel between small towns in California in a nostalgic setting that seems to be approximately the 1960s, performing their Cirque du Soleil-type acts for the townspeople.

The French Romani Corbeaus (“Ravens”) attach wings made of wire and feathers to their bodies and perform acrobatics in the treetops.
description

The young women in the Latino Paloma family (“Doves”) dress up as mermaids and do mystic underwater dance routines.
description
Why doves? Seriously, they should have been called the Delfín ("Dolphin") or Angelote ("Angelfish") family, or something fishy water-related like that.

What outsiders don't know is that the Corbeaus actually grow feathers in their hair, and the Palomas have escalas, small scattered birthmarks that look like fish scales.

For the last twenty years, the Corbeau/Paloma feud has taken a bitter turn, to the point where the families try to sabotage each other, and anyone touching a member of the other clan – other than in a fight – will be exiled from the family.
Fighting was the only safe way to touch a Paloma… The rage made it good and true. The anger and honor of defending this family shielded them like a saint’s prayer. Hitting and kicking were safe. Anything else could bring sickness.
Each family is convinced that the members of the other family are completely, utterly and despicably in the wrong.

The story alternates between the viewpoints of two teenage members of these families: Lace Paloma, who struggles with staying thin enough to be considered a worthy member of the mermaid performers, and a Corbeau boy called Cluck, who works behind the scenes, fixing the performers’ feathered wings and performing other odd jobs, because an old injury to his hand prevents him from joining the performances. Cluck is an outsider in his own family, doing odd things like wearing his grandfather’s old clothes, and being bullied by other Corbeaus, especially his brother Dax. Both Lace and Cluck feel alienated, struggling with the superstitious rigidity and unreasoning anger and abuse that runs through their families.

When Lace and Cluck first meet each other in the town of Almendro, neither realizes that the other is a member of their rival clan. But a tragic industrial accident in the town brings Lace and Cluck back together. Cluck, in seeking to help Lace, unwittingly leads to Lace’s expulsion from the Paloma clan: a feather-shaped burn mark on her arm is the proof, at least to Lace’s abuela, who rules the Palomas with an iron fist, that Lace has committed the unpardonable sin of allowing a gitano (gypsy) boy to touch her. And Lace, believing that Cluck’s forgiveness for her earlier rudeness to him will remove the feather brand from her arm, allows him to take her to meet his family without telling him that she’s a Paloma. Inevitably the truth will out, but by then the attraction between them has taken hold, and even a bitter feud isn’t enough to erase it. Hope is, also, a thing with feathers.
She was there to pull Cluck to his feet and keep him there if he couldn’t stand. To make sure none of the pieces of him got lost if he broke. In case his mother, neat as a greenhouse tulip, failed to notice that he was not dust or cracked glass, and reached for a broom.
The evocative, dreamlike words and imagery throughout The Weight of Feathers tend to obscure, a little bit, the fact that these families are so dysfunctional and abusive. And yet there is love there too, enough to make it difficult for Lace and Cluck, or any member of their families, to break the cycle of hatred, where doing so requires them to also break the ties that bind them to their families.

The Weight of Feathers is peppered with words and phrases in both Spanish and French (I made liberal use of my Kindle’s automatic translation feature). Each chapter begins with an appropriate saying in French or Spanish; these, at least, are translated for the reader. The families’ different cultures and backgrounds add a welcome element of depth to this otherwise familiar story of two star-crossed young lovers. And there are some unexpected turns in the plot that make this something more than just a modern retelling of Romeo and Juliet.

This story is, at heart, a young adult romance spiced with some magical realism. The lovely, haunting language makes The Weight of Feathers a better-than-usual entry in the young adult fantasy romance genre, but I really wouldn’t recommend it to any readers who don’t enjoy young adult romances. If you do like sweet romances tinged with a bit of a supernatural element, you'll find rewards, and even some food for thought, in the pages of this novel.

By itself, the plot and storyline would rate 3 stars from me, maybe 3 1/2. But I'm kind of a sucker for evocative language and imagery, so I'm rounding this up to 4 stars.

Free advance copy received from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Thanks!
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Korrina  (OwlCrate)
Utterly brilliant. This is a book to be savoured in bits. I'm glad I had the chance to read this slowly, burning the beautiful lines in my mind. Anna-Marie McLemore is right up there among the writers who truly create art and movement out of their sentences. If you like Leigh Bardugo, Maggie Stiefvater or Laini Taylor, and you haven't read any books by Anna-Marie McLemore, I urge you to pick one up. You won't regret it.
Lia
We are not small enough that you can pull us where you want us to go.



I only have one word for you, Anna-Marie McLemore: THANKS.
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This novel is everything I've ever wanted in a book, and way more.
Fantastic writing (that kinda reminded me of All the Crooked Saints by my goddess in leather bracelets Maggie Stiefvater...or is it the other way around?), beautiful and original magical realism and amazing characters.
I'll forever cherish this tiny gem and keep it close to my heart for co
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may ❀
✔ Book #6 for the Contemporary-A-Thon under the challenge, "read a diverse contemporary" "

i think i enjoyed the concept of this book more than the actual book itself

the characters are interesting and i love the diversity but my guys, the pacinggggg
it
was
so
slow
and thats just rude, im trying to do a readathon here.

okay but seriously, i adore the idea of enemies to lovers, especially when its done in the romeo/juliet format where the families hate each other bc then its
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Rae
Jan 23, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Buddy Read with the lovelies Scrill and Ashlynn


AHH! I loved it!!

"He had taught her the language and the landscape, shown her this country’s trees, the secret thrill of almost falling."

"The sense of falling did not touch her, not as long as her body was between the hands of this boy who felt steadier in the air than on the ground."



We have all heard the story of Romeo and Juliette a thousand different ways, and we all fall in love just to have our hearts ripped out in the end. But/>
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Chelsea ❤Peril Please❤

 photo tumblr_static_9i013dua7604sk0g00w04g0s_zps1fet2rvg.gif

Very very cute. Just not...dazzling...in the way I wanted it to be. Don't get me wrong-it was beautiful. Just not for me. It wasn't a matter of the characters-because I adored them and was very invested and got lots of butterflies. It was the history. So. Much. History. And for someone who doesn't mind a little background information, this is perfect for you. The story was amazing. But, for me, when I'm as tired as I am, it took too much away from the romance I wanted to overtake the story.

RTC. Maybe. If
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Scrill
Jan 20, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
"The sense of falling did not touch her, not as long as her body was between the hands of this boy who felt steadier in the air than on the ground."

Long before their fateful encounter, Lace Paloma and Luc Corbeau’s families have rivaled. With a history that involves death, these two families live and breathe hatred for each other. As traveling showman, both families couldn’t be more different; the Paloma’s performing with fins in the water and the Corbeau’s with wings on the backs up in the trees. Amo
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Stacee
I just don't have words for this book. It was perfection.

Love love loved Lace and Cluck. They're so similar and so different and loyal to their families. I wanted to jump in the book and squeeze both of them.

It's lyrical and whimsical and swoony and strange and sad and I loved every single page of it.

**Huge thanks to Thomas Dunne Books and NetGalley for providing the arc in exchange for an honest review**
Mogsy (MMOGC)
4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum http://bibliosanctum.com/2016/01/09/y...

Lately, most of my audio listens have been on the darker and heavier side, so when I was given the opportunity to review the audiobook of The Weight of Feathers, it didn’t take much convincing to give this lighter, more romantic title a try. Magical realism can be hit or miss with me, but even though I hesitated over some of the mixed reviews I’ve seen for this book, ultimately the theme of forbidden love won me over.

With shades of Romeo and
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Mackenzi
Feb 18, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is such a rare and beautiful book. Though calling it a book seems like an understatement, because really, it's an experience. It wrapped me up and held onto me, and I could smell it and touch it and taste it. At a few places, I started to cry just because it was so beautiful I couldn't stand it. And the writing is so good it made me sick with envy!

You need to get this book. And then you need to cuddle it and hold it close and just breathe it in.
Mari
Sep 22, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition

Full review to come!

This is my first finished book for #HispanicHeritageReads and it was a great start. I thought the right was constantly sweet and nice, if not always very sophisticated. The story was pretty simple, but I loved the underlying feeling that beneath this story of scales and wings and family feuds, there was subtle commentary about prejudice and the blindness of hate. I enjoyed it a lot and the highest compliment I can pay it is that I already miss the characters. I love Lace
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Jillian
Sep 11, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
i have no words. anna-marie mclemore has all the beautiful words. idk how to write reviews anymore. i just really really loved this! the atmosphere, the slow burn of it, it was just so good. it's a quiet book, it's not extremely plot driven (there is one but it's not what made me love this book), but the characters are interesting and every page reveals new layers of these characters to the reader in the lovliest way. i can't wait to read more from this author.4.5 stars
Mauoijenn
This book was OUTSTANDING!!
I loved the writing, characters and the ending. No bad Romeo and Juliet juju here. I totally thought this book would not live up to the hype but I was WRONG. Excellent read!
Alaina
After reading The Night Circus I have been wanting to dive into another circus related kind of book. So I was beyond happy that I found another book and then I fell in love because it was completely different from The Night Circus. Yes, The Weight of Feathers is about a travelling circus crew but it was such a good story and different from the other book. Again, I really enjoyed it!

The Weight of Feathers is about two rival families, the Palomas and the Corbeaus. Anyone thinking of Romeo and Juliet?!?! BECAUSE I WAS!/>The
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Dani ❤️ Perspective of a Writer
description
Check out more reviews @ Perspective of a Writer...

The Buzz

I shelved this back in 2015 to read, probably due to an ARC review that I don't remember. I do remember that it was a retelling and this was before I became interested in the genre. So when I was cutting books left and right off my TBR I kept this one for my retelling pile. I'm so happy I did. Now I really understand the allure of a Anna-Marie McLemore book.


The Premise

As a Romeo and Juliet retelling I knew that I needed to adjust my brain beforehand to two families beinbook.
TheWriter...
The
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Giovanna
Apr 22, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I received a copy via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

"Each feather became ten more. They spread like a thousand red lacewings. They rose like every one was its own bird, full and winged. They turned the trees to autumn, all red-feathered boughs."

Beautiful. Completely different from what I expected, but for once in a positive way. The Weight of Feathers is delicate and yet powerful, one of those stories that probably won't impress you from the start but take root in your heart in the lon/>"Each
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Jazzy [ jazbooked ]
2.5 STARS

This was a fairytale of sorts, a retelling one of Shakespeare's most famous manuscripts. Through vivid descriptions and many secrets and family drama, McLemore created this spiraling romance fit for those who enjoy love stories, magical realism, and pretty words.

The characters...
OH, MY STARS CLUCK. Cluck is a Corbeaus. He was unloved and rejected by his family, and for his entire life, he struggles with knowing why. His side of the story was VERY sad, and I got made multip
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Faith Simon
Jan 29, 2019 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I've done it! I've finally read all of Anna-Marie's published novels!
Upon having finished this, I could tell that this was her debut novel, it's a bit odd going into this after having read her following novels first instead of this book being my first read, because it's like going backwards, I know how well she writes now, but I could definitely pinpoint where her beginnings were. She's gotten so much better as a writer since writing this, her writing isn't nearly as poetic as it came to b
...more
Carol
Aug 24, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
***3.75 stars***
This story was very interesting. It's a Romeo and Juliet retelling with magical-realism sprinkled on there. I really liked the slow burn romance. At a first glance, Cluck and Lace are pretty average characters, but once we get to know them they have many unique characteristics. I really liked the writing, but I didn't love it how I was expecting to. This book is barely 300 pages long, so I do wish the story would've been longer. Overall, this was definitely a lovely story.
Chantal  (Every Word A Doorway)
I have mixed feelings about this novel, but overall it just didn't hit the mark for me. Need to stir over my feelings a little.

Review to come!
Iris
I... I honestly still have no clue what I think of this book.

I hated the first half, and I loved the second half.

And I don't have the slightest clue what shifted.

Maybe I got used to the writing style. Because I sure wasn't liking it early on, but by the end I loved it. Maybe the characters grew on me. They started out very flat and... honestly I don't think they ever felt fully developed to me, but by the end I was so invested in them. Maybe the plot got more interest
...more
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Sirens Conference: The Weight of Feathers 7 26 Mar 25, 2016 09:28AM  

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1,577 followers
Anna-Marie McLemore was born in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains and taught by her family to hear la llorona in the Santa Ana winds. She is the author of THE WEIGHT OF FEATHERS, a finalist for the 2016 William C. Morris Debut Award; 2017 Stonewall Honor Book WHEN THE MOON WAS OURS, which was longlisted for the National Book Award in Young People’s Literature; WILD BEAUTY, a Kirkus Best B ...more
“He wore his loneliness like his scar.” 28 likes
“The sense of falling did not touch her, not as long as her body was between the hands of this boy who felt steadier in the air than on the ground.” 14 likes
More quotes…