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G Is for Googol: A Math Alphabet Book
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G Is for Googol: A Math Alphabet Book

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4.11  ·  Rating details ·  313 ratings  ·  51 reviews
B is for Binary, F is for Fibonacci, P is for Probability... even a small sample begins to give you the idea that this is a math book unlike any other. Ranging freely from exponents to light-years to numbers found in nature, this smorgasbord of math concepts and trivia makes a perfect classroom companion or gift book for the budding young mathematician at home. Even the mo ...more
Hardcover, 60 pages
Published September 1st 1998 by Tricycle Press
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4.11  · 
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 ·  313 ratings  ·  51 reviews


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Dolly
Sep 14, 2013 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: parents reading with their older children
This is a very detailed mathematical alphabet book. It took us a month to get through all twenty-six letters - the information was presented in an entertaining way, but we really could only absorb it one letter at a time, often discussing the concepts a bit on our own after we read the page. It even got us to look up videos so we could learn how to use the abacus we brought back from Japan.

We were all familiar with many of the topics, but we often learned something new or interesting. In most ca
...more
Emma
Jul 02, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: math
G Is For Googol is the quintessential reference book for STEM because it covers topics that are relevant to all of the STEM subjects. From abacus to zillion, this advanced ABC book conveys complex ideas in the funniest way possible. “R is for Rhombicosidodecahedron” is one of my favorites. A rhombicosidodecahedron (ROM-bi-cosi-DOE-DECK-a-HEE-dron) is a special kind of three-dimensional shape with flat sides. Schwartz manages to effectively describe this complex shape by building upon the reader’ ...more
Cheryl
Nov 25, 2017 marked it as xx-dnf-skim-reference
Honestly, I just skimmed. I like maths, and had lots of fun with them when I was a child. But this is so dense with information... it feels to me like a 26 week course. And sometimes the writing & puzzles are awfully challenging, but there's no answer key. And sometimes the writing and explanations are on a level for beginning readers. Maybe this is a good thing, because kids of different ages can get different things from it? Good book for the classrooms of math teachers of 8-10 (?) year ol ...more
Hailey Dellinger
Great combination of Literacy and Math!!! Since this book does go over some complex words I would use this for middle school students to introduce math vocabulary. This is an interesting book that could help students explore these complex words. This has a variety of information about math that includes mathematicians, geometry, and a glossary to help understand and further explore words introduced. I have not seen a math alphabet book until I found this book. Students could write their own alph ...more
Robyn Lynch
Dec 08, 2017 rated it liked it
Shelves: libs-642
This is the most complex ABC children's book I have ever seen. At times I feel as though it was too much for children. I think I could use this book in a lesson, but I would never give this book to an elementary aged child and expect them to read and comprehend the information. If we did the book a page a day I think that would be more beneficial than trying to comprehend the book in its entirety. I would maybe use this in my class as we worked on a section that correlated as a class warm-up alo ...more
Sierra Fresh
Nov 14, 2017 rated it it was amazing
This book is so fun! It is an alphabetical book with each new letter presenting a new mathematical concept. The illustrations are beautiful and add clarity to each idea. This book would be awesome in any classroom, and it could really add (even more) excitement to the study of math.
Arlene S
Library and other journals say middle grade and up, some say grade 3-5 and up. Quite sophisticated information, but presented as an understandable jumping off point for further exploration.
Clarissa
Dec 05, 2014 rated it really liked it
Shelves: informational
G is for Googol: A Math Alphabet Book by David M Schwartz is a fun-filled learning journey through the A's to Z's of math. A is for abacus and other math terms that students will run across in math through the years. But how much fun is vocabulary really? And math vocabulary is even less likely to bring a hoorah from students. So Schwartz does his level best at engaging interest and making these dry math terms come to life for student readers. Each two page section is dedicated to one letter, ma ...more
Karissa Olson
Dec 08, 2015 rated it really liked it
This book is a fairly in-depth version of an alphabet book. The book is all about math, which would be great to have in the classroom as a reference for students. Inside the book there is mathematical information ranging from the Fibonacci sequence to information about probability. This would not be a book that teacher would read aloud to the class all at once, but as they progressed throughout the year read different sections as they came to them. There are illustrations on every page, which ma ...more
Chak
Oct 11, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Recommends it for: Geeks everywhere
Shelves: kid, science-and-math
I actually read this book on my own, I enjoyed it so much. It's a Math Alphabet book, probably good for matheletes of all ages, starting around 6 or 7. To give you an example of some of the topics, we have A is for Abacus, B in for Binary, C is for Cubit, D is for Diamond, E is for Equilateral and Exponent (they were too excited to just give one E entry), F is for Fibonacci, etc. You get the idea of what level they are at.

Little T and I especially liked "K is for Königsberg" (about the "Königsb
...more
Kelly Powell
Jan 30, 2015 rated it it was ok
This is a great book for introducing, teaching, and furthering your learning in the subject of math. Each page uses a letter of the Alphabet to tie into a word in the mathematics department. Some of these words were new to me and I was intrigued to read the explanation of the word I didn’t know previously. I was also able to learn something in the explanation of some of the words I already did know. A great wealth of knowledge for young minds and a book that you can read several times and learn ...more
Jo Oehrlein
Jun 10, 2014 rated it really liked it
Not a picture book you can blow through in 5-10 minutes, there's 1-4 pages of text (and pictures!) for each letter of the alphabet. I could quibble about some of the words they chose (really, D is for Diamond?), but there are also additional words in the "and ___ is also for" section for each letter.

It seems like they're trying to keep the terms limited to arithmetic/pre-algebra/elementary school geometry.

The book ends with a nice glossary of terms.

This book would be a nice starting point for m
...more
Brittany Balunas
Jul 03, 2012 rated it liked it
Since the members of my cohort and I discussed ABC books in our literacy class and published our own, I found the tie in to math and literacy to be great. This would be a great book to have in the classroom library. Children could explore this book on their own for independent reading. Since the vocabulary is a little complex, I would not use this as a read aloud or in lower elementary classrooms. However, this is a great introduction to math vocabulary that could spark interest and further expl ...more
Audrey
Dec 08, 2014 added it
G is for Googol breaks the barrier for typical vocabulary textbooks. This math book designates two pages each to one letter that describes a math term. Though definitions might be boring the illustrations keep the message alive and virbrant making kids memorization easier. This book is fantastic for early math stages and the basics to learning how to study for future work ethic. Another David Schwartz classic that we can learn with
Kayla
Feb 25, 2015 rated it liked it
Shelves: informative
This book was a fantastic read. I was amazed by the authors ability to intertwine math and literacy. I think this book would be a very beneficial read for my students. Even if they have read this book before I would encourage them to read it again because there is so much information you could learn something new a second time reading it.
Karin
Apr 21, 2008 rated it really liked it
Shelves: homeschool, kids
This was great! I could read just the titles for Abe and there was tons more text that I could sort through for Zeke. It could definitely be read by an older child and enjoyed. It named a bunch of math concepts that we haven't discussed yet, but they loved the pictures and conversation bubbles. And I think it helped to look forward to what else is out there.
Frank Lee
Jul 18, 2012 rated it it was amazing
I liked how this book combined literacy and math. However, some of the words such used may be too complex for younger students. In addition, young students may not be able to relate the letter to word used because they are not familiar with the word used. I thought the illustrations did a good job of demonstrating the theme of the book.
Bonnie
Dec 13, 2016 rated it really liked it
A fun informational book: I was surprised at how much math I learned that I had never heard of, and in very interesting ways! Includes glossary, other words reader can look up, and invitations to try and discover things on your own.
ckodama152
Oct 18, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: math, abc-books
Great book to talk about different math concepts and vocabulary. There are some more complex math terms defined, so this book would be perfect for 5th graders and up. The pictures and examples used are also funny and help explain the concepts well.
Lisa
May 09, 2010 rated it it was amazing
This is such a GOOD book. I read it to my 7 year old and he LOVES it. We borrowed it from the library but its going to be one we have to add to our own library at home. K for the seven bridges of Königsberg is my favorite, I actually never had heard of it before!!

Marissa Pezzullo
Jan 28, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: informational
G is for Googol would be a great book for helping children to learn math concepts while reading a book. It would be good for younger children if you wanted to get them used to the sounds that the letters make. I thought this had great illustrations that can keep a child of any age engaged.
Ruth Ann
Sep 04, 2010 added it
Shelves: math, alphabet
Quirky pictures and witty text give this book great appeal. There is lots of information on each page so this is definitely a book for older kids. From units, to mathematicians and geometry, all things math are included here. Also includes a glossary in the back.
Cruth
Dec 21, 2014 rated it liked it
Straight forward compilation of mathematical ideas including probability, Venn diagrams and standard units. Would be a good resource in class or a nice read for someone interested in beginner concepts.

Recommended for: 8+

-CR-
Jeri
Nov 11, 2011 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: kids-books
An awesome book that explains multiple math concepts in a fun, interesting way. I'd put this one down for older kids even though it is an alphabet book because of some of the math concepts it explains.

Mandy Casto
Nov 04, 2012 rated it liked it
Great for high school or advanced middle school. This is a fun book to introduce in a math class or use as the leading example of a summative math project (requiring students to create a similar book about the concepts they have covered in class).
Allison Burke
This is a fantastic book for older students. It links literacy with math providing several higher level vocabulary words that are used in math. It also shows everyday examples about how these words are used in everyday life. Grades 3-5.
DixieJo
Jul 10, 2008 rated it it was amazing
This is a "picture book" that is a fun introduction to math words that are in our math future. We probably won't use all of them... but they are fun to learn anyway. Example: E is for Equilateral (with it's definition). And "E" is also for ellipse, equation, equivalent fractions and estimate.
Sally
Feb 22, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: own, math-kids
Ordered this from Scholastic, and it's one of my all-time favorite books for kids. It's an alphabet book of math concepts, succinctly described, with humorous illustrations. I once used this to teach a class for a homeschool co-op and it was well-received by both kids and adults.
Amy
Apr 23, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Charlotte: I think this book teaches you funny things about math. I liked "B is for Binary."

Amy: Not your usual alphabet book, this teaches kids about advanced math concepts like Fibonacci numbers, binary, abacus.
Cynthia
Jul 31, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Alphabet book based on math concepts and history. A bit wordy to read aloud in one sitting, but certainly a valuable resource for learning math concepts and trivia. A nice collaborative resources as well.
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