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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

(Adventures of Tom and Huck #2)

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3.83  ·  Rating details ·  1,220,146 ratings  ·  17,788 reviews
A nineteenth-century boy from a Mississippi River town recounts his adventures as he travels down the river with a runaway slave, encountering a family involved in a feud, two scoundrels pretending to be royalty, and Tom Sawyer's aunt who mistakes him for Tom. ...more
Paperback, 327 pages
Published December 31st 2002 by Penguin Classics (first published December 1884)
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Nate No, it is a fiction invented on the day you were born and perpetrated with the collusion of the entirety of humanity with the sole aim of messing with…moreNo, it is a fiction invented on the day you were born and perpetrated with the collusion of the entirety of humanity with the sole aim of messing with your head. In truth, not only is there no Huckleberry Finn, there was never a Mark Twain. Of course, because I've now broken the pact I'll shortly be summarily executed. This is my legacy to you, Natalia--the breaking of this horrible illusion.(less)
Amber Dawn You don't have to read "Tom Sawyer." In fact, I feel like this book is improved by not knowing the facts of "Tom Sawyer." …moreYou don't have to read "Tom Sawyer." In fact, I feel like this book is improved by not knowing the facts of "Tom Sawyer." (less)

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Average rating 3.83  · 
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David
Feb 27, 2010 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
After reading Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, I realized that I had absolutely nothing to say about it. And yet here, as you see, I have elected to say it anyway, and at great length.

Reading this novel now, at the age of mumble-mumble, is a bit like arriving at the circus after the tents have been packed, the bearded lady has been depilated, and the funnel cake trailers have been hitched to pick-up trucks and captained, like a formidable vending armada, toward the auburn sunset. All the fun has
...more
Petra: all work & no play makes you poor.On hiatus
This is a rant. I found Huckleberry Finn on my bookshelf had been changed to Huckleberry Finn Robotic Edition. Some very pc "authors" and "editors" took it upon themselves to change the N word to 'robot'. They then rewrote the book to take away any mention of humans and to 'roboticise' words such as 'eye' which becomes something like 'optical device'. The illustrations have also been changed. I have no problem with this, but I do have two major issues with this edition.

The first problem is with
...more
Nathan Eilers
Nov 11, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: fiction
Hemingway said American fiction begins and ends with Huck Finn, and he's right. Twain's most famous novel is a tour de force. He delves into issues such as racism, friendship, war, religion, and freedom with an uncanny combination of lightheartedness and gravitas. There are several moments in the book that are hilarious, but when I finished the book, I knew I had read something profound. This is a book that everyone should read. ...more
Ahmad Sharabiani
(Book 825 from 1001 books) - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn = Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Adventures of Tom and Huck #2), Mark Twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a novel by Mark Twain, first published in the United Kingdom in December 1884 and in the United States in February 1885.

It is told in the first person by Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, the narrator of two other Twain novels (Tom Sawyer Abroad and Tom Sawyer, Detective) and a friend of Tom Sawyer.

It is a direct sequel to The Adve
...more
Dr. Appu Sasidharan
Feb 12, 2020 rated it it was amazing

Mark Twain tells us the story of Huckleberry Finn and Jim, who attempts to free themselves from society's restraints in this book. The racism aspect of this novel is one of the most discussed and debated topics.

The readers will have to encounter the N-word multiple times, which can be difficult for many people. The beauty of this book is that it can be viewed from various angles. The theme of how black and white people work together for their quest for freedom has inspired many people. Ther
...more
Matt
Aug 07, 2007 rated it it was amazing
"I about made up my mind to pray; and see if I couldn't try to quit being the kind of boy I was, and be better. So I kneeled down. But the words wouldn't come. Why wouldn't they? It warn't no use to try and hide it from Him. Nor from me, neither. I knowed very well why they wouldn't come. It was because my heart wasn't right; it was because I warn't square; it was because I was playing double. I was letting on to give up sin, but away inside of me I was holding on to the biggest one of all. I wa ...more
Tharindu Dissanayake
"Yes; en I's rich now, come to look at it. I owns mysef, en I's wuth eight hund'd dollars. I wish I had de money, I wouldn't want no mo'."

Though this book is might have the appearance of the second book to the Adventure's of Tom Sawyer, it is not at all similar. Tom Sawyer was a simple, fun-filled story covering a brief series of events where as this is a much heavier work in almost every aspect. Aside from having certain shared characters, reader will find no find other similarity.

However, wha
...more
Gene
May 25, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: adventure
Review updated on 16.02.2017.

Ask any person anywhere in the world to give an example of a classic book of US literature and it is a safe bet this one will come out among the top three. The only reason I am going to mention the plot for such famous book is the fact that I always do it; I am not breaking my own tradition in this case. So an orphan boy and a runaway slave travel together in Southern US. One of the most interesting parts of the book for me was gradual change in Huck's attitude towar
...more
Lisa
Jun 25, 2014 rated it it was amazing
"That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it."

What makes a classic? A question I have had to ask myself repeatedly over the last few days, after students in Grade 8 received the task to come to the library and "check out a classic to read". There was a list with the usual suggestions, but students ventured out and started to explore shelves, and then came to me with a wide range of books, repeating the question:

"Is this a classic?"

Why did
...more
Kenny
We catched fish, and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn’t ever feel like talking loud, and it warn’t often that we laughed, only a kind of low chuckle. We had mighty good weather, as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all, that night, nor the next, nor the next.
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn ~~ Mark Twain


1
Selected by Kenny McCool for
...more
Blaine
NOTICE
PERSONS attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.
BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR
...
Jim said that bees won't sting idiots, but I didn't believe that, because I tried them lots of times myself and they wouldn't sting me.
...
Human beings can be awful cruel to one another.
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn opens in the aftermath of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and fo
...more
Glenn Sumi
Why have I never read Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn before? Was it Twain’s copious use of the N word? (I vaguely recall a primary school teacher abruptly halting a class read-aloud session, perhaps because of that.) Was it the air of earnest solemnity that surrounds so-called classics? Sheer laziness?

No matter. I’ve read it now, and I’ll never be the same again. Hemingway was right when he said (and I’m paraphrasing) all American literature comes from Huck Finn. While it’d be entertaining to re
...more
Madeline
Nov 19, 2012 rated it really liked it
Shelves: the-list
I had to read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer in middle school, and I fervently wish that they had made us read Huck Finn instead. I mean, I understand why they didn't (giving middle schoolers an excuse to throw around racial slurs in a classroom setting is just asking for a lawsuit from somebody's parents), but Huck Finn is better. It's smarter, it's funnier, and Huck's adventures stay with you a lot longer than Tom's, because Huck's experiences were richer and more interesting, whereas The Advent ...more
MCOH
Mar 06, 2009 rated it liked it
I had mixed feelings about this book.

On the one hand, it's clear that Mark Twain was progressive for his day, satirizing the topsy-turvy morals of the slavery-era south. His heroes are two people at the bottom rung of the social ladder - a runaway slave, and the son of the town drunk. Though they're not valued by society, they turn out to be the two most honorable characters of the book. And I appreciated the questions it raised, about how we construct our own sense of morality in the context of
...more
Fabian
Mar 03, 2011 rated it really liked it
THE Greatest American Novel?

Well...

No wonder the Spanish think themselves intellectually/culturally superior with their Quixote, undoubtedly a blueprint for this mischievous Every Boy! Huck Finn is the full embodiment of THE American Fantasy: mainly that dire misconception that the protagonist of the world is you and that everything gravitates around that essential nucleus. Everyone in town thinks Huck dead, and what does he do but follow the tradition of a plot folding unto itself (as Don Q f
...more
Manny
One of my absolute favourite books, which I have read multiple times. A major classic. If at all possible, get an edition with the original illustrations.
___________________________________

(Expanded review based on conversation with JORDAN)

Here in Switzerland, l'affaire du mot N hasn't quite had the high profile it's received on its home territory. In fact, I'm embarrassed to admit that I hadn't even heard of it until Jordan gave me a few pointers earlier today. So, no doubt all this has been sa
...more
mina reads™️
tom sawyer was a vexation on my spirit and I’m so glad I finished this so I never have to hear from him again
Matthew
Pretty good, kinda silly - but I think that is what Twain was going for - 3.5 stars.

Twain is the king of the Yarn. Huckleberry Finn is a collection of outlandish tales all with lies and trickery at their heart. At the time of its release I am sure it became a bible for scoundrels and mischevious teens.

This book is controversial, and even frequently banned, because of its portrayal of black slaves and the use of the N-word. I venture into shaky ground here by offering my opinion as I am white, bu
...more
Najeefa Nasreen
May 21, 2022 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: classics
With this, completing 6 of 339 from The Rory Gilmore Reading List.

4.5/5 stars

Although, it might look as if this The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, it is not the same. Apart from the names, there is no other similarity between the two.

I was baffled by the style of writing. It was different. The tone was different too. I enjoyed reading about Huckleberry Finn more than Tom Sawyer.

If you happen to be one who's always in the hunt of character development
...more
Jen - The Tolkien Gal
I knows I's gywne teh like tis book
A delightfully funny and nostalgic piece of writing. This is my first Mark Twain and it will most certainly not be my last.

Secondhand Nostalgia
Although my grandfather grew up in the 1940s and not 1840s, there is an undeniable similarity in their childhoods. Both by grandfather and Huck are masterful storytellers who convey a tenable sense of freedom - stories that elicit nostalgia in me although I have not experienced them myself. Both convey a time that was si
...more
Bradley
Mar 30, 2013 rated it it was amazing
I'm awfully afraid about reviewing this here book. The pooooolice might be coming up here to give me my what-fors because I done be talking about plot and meaning like as such the author promised me there be none.

Woooooo-weeeee

I ain't never had the authorities after me and don't feel like startin none now.

So, apoligeezies, fair folk, and ooooh! Lookie there! It's a naked man running! Did you ever see such a thing!?

*scrambles out the back side of this review, never to be seen again*
...more
Uhtred
Jul 06, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
I have re-read Huckleberry Finn after more than 30 years and I must say that I did not remember it at all like that. Another of those books that are read by children believing that they are children's books and that then when they re-read as adults they have unexpected feelings. There are all the emotions of the great American novels of the past, that is, the discovery, the journey, going beyond both geographical and psychological borders, the vastness of America, freedom, everything. If you rea ...more
Barry Pierce
I really quite enjoyed this well-written satire of slavery-era America. I reads a lot like a Dickens novel, very episodic and with a youthful protagonist. I'll put aside the fact that Huck Finn may be the most annoying character in all of literature and say that this is a great American classic for a reason. It's captivating, it's funny, and it's never boring. While it may not have aged very well, it's still an important text that covers a time when America was in its adolescent stage. ...more
Michael Perkins
Oct 01, 2012 rated it it was amazing
"All right, then, I'll GO to hell" --

This is Huck's decision, rather than turn in his friend, Jim. They had been through many things together.

Here's the story....

Huck faked his death and ran away from his drunken father. On Jackson’s Island, in the middle of the Mississippi River, Huck encounters Jim, a runaway slave and his friend. Jim fled because he overheard his owner, Miss Watson, planning to sell him to a plantation. Huck and Jim ultimately must escape the island because their campfire is
...more
Simona B
Nov 13, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: in-english, 1800
3.5

"There warn't no home like a raft, after all."


I mean, at the beginning there's a notice that reads "Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot." How am I supposed not to fall in love, pray tell?

This book swarms with key issues of Twain's -today's- America -world-, all properly backed up by irresistible humour and irony. As I've said elsewhere before, T
...more
Brian
Apr 20, 2014 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
2016 RE-READ

I read this when I was like ten or something and all I remembered was that it was one of my favorites. Here I am, 26 years later, having read it again, and loving it perhaps more than I did then. I don’t remember Mark Twain being so damn hilarious. I mean I was in hysteria I was laughing so hard. I had to cover my mouth a few times when I burst out laughing when I was reading next to my sleeping beauty. I liked this so much that I bought a hard copy. I plan to read it again and again
...more
MJ Nicholls
Having never so much as fingertipped a Twain until this moment, in the last rattle of my twenties, this caustic racial satire packaged as a rootin’-tootin’ Boys Own romp proved a pleasant surprise, rather like some other late-in-the-game experiences in my life, such as listening to Tom Waits for the first time, discovering the movies of Werner Herzog, and having a proper relationship with a woman who turned out not to be an asexual narcissist. [I include the last bit to shock regular viewers use ...more
Matthew Ted
129th book of 2020.

It All Starts Here

Hemingway famously said, “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called 'Huckleberry Finn, It's the best book we've had. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before.” It is not Hemingway’s best quote in my opinion, that, unrelatedly, goes to, “I drink to make other people more interesting.” But that’s beside the point – but does lead us into the beginning of Huckleberry Finn with his escape from his alcoholic fathe
...more
James
Aug 07, 2016 rated it really liked it
Review
4 out of 5 stars to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, one of the "Great American Novels" by Mark Twain published in 1884. I've actually read this book twice: once as a 14-year-old and again in college as part of my many American English courses. My interpretations have expanded with the second read, but it's still at the core, a very profound book worth reading at least once in a lifetime.

Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer appear in a few of Twain's novels, but it is in this one where
...more
Michael Finocchiaro
More mature and longer than its cousin, Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn remains an incredible kid's story of initiation and adventure. Yes, there is some racial stereotypes in the depiction of Jim, but let's give Mark Twain the benefit of the doubt that he is trying to tell a good story and is sympathetic to the anti-slavery movement. An amazing tale that has not aged a bit! ...more
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Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He is noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), called "the Great American Novel", and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876).

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which would later provide the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. He apprenticed with a printer. He also work
...more

Other books in the series

Adventures of Tom and Huck (4 books)
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
  • Tom Sawyer Abroad
  • Tom Sawyer, Detective

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