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Francis A. Schaeffer
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He is there and He is not silent

4.22  ·  Rating details ·  1,296 Ratings  ·  70 Reviews

Tyndale celebrates the thirtieth anniversary of this twentieth-century spiritual classic with a special commemorative edition featuring new foreword by Chuck Colson and introduction by Dr. Jerram Barrs, director of the Schaeffer Institute.

He Is There and He Is Not Silent discusses fundamental questions about God, such as who he is and why he matters.

Unknown Binding, 100 pages
Published January 28th 1972 by Tyndale House Publishers (first published January 1st 1972)
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Marsha Stokes
Another in a series of religious books that I was recommended, I chose to read this next because the main body of the book is less than 100 pages! I thought, "Great! I can read this in just a couple days!" However, I greatly underestimated how intellectual this author is. With practically every other page containing one or more words that I would have to look up, I think this book has stretched my vocabulary more than anything else I have read since college! Here is a quick sample of some of the ...more
David Sarkies
Aug 16, 2013 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: Nobody really
Recommended to David by: A friend from church
Shelves: christian
Responding to a materialist society
18 August 2013

This is the third book in the so called Francis Schaeffer trilogy and I must admit that it does not seem to go anywhere. I guess the thing that put me off this book is that in the introduction he tried to convince us that this book, and in fact the whole trilogy, is like scripture in that all three books go together. Seriously, anybody who tries to convince me that their books are like scripture is going to put me off because scripture is scriptu
...more
Peter N.
Jan 26, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
For a long time I have felt that presuppositional apologetics and classic apologetics, when done and held rightly, can be mutually supporting. Presuppositions feed facts. But facts, the way the world is, feed our presuppositions as well. While Schaeffer does not use this exact terminology that is part of the lesson I learned from this book.

I found this book more difficult than Escape from Reason and for some reason I skipped The God Who is There, which I will have to pick up. Schaeffer outlines
...more
William Dicks
This was the first book I ever read by Schaeffer, back in the late 80s. It altered forever how I thought about life, God and Christianity. I came from a Christian tradition where thinking was not required. You were a Christian because you had "faith," no matter if that faith was a contentless faith. Schaeffer taught me that to become a thinking Christian was a good and necessary thing!
Frankie Della Torre
"No finite reference point has meaning without an infinite reference point." ~ Sean-Paul Sarte

In his classic work, "He Is There and He Is Not Silent," Francis Schaeffer addresses the three foundational facets of philosophy: metaphysics, morality, and epistemology. Schaeffer's approach is to begin with the problems that these three branches of philosophy present to any thinking person. Why would something like morality be a "problem"? Well, according to Schaeffer, all persons have the duty to con
...more
Bingley
Apr 20, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I know of few books as short and impactful as this small, unassuming read.

If you are an atheist, agnostic, Catholic, Protestant, philosopher, or every day person who just wants to grow as a thinker...this book grapples with some incredibly complex notions in some of the most accessible and easily understandable language I've ever come across.

Basically, the book starts with the Higher Order Questions and Schaeffer's own observations about peoples' assumptions (he calls them presuppositions) and
...more
Rebecca
Interesting. The books, The God Who Is There, and Escape from Reason would have been helpful to read, as they apparently make up a threesome with this work.

I appreciate the way Schaeffer writes with more depth than the average evangelical.

Thought provoking quote:

"...evangelicals have made a horrible mistake by often equating the fact that man is lost and under God's judgment with the idea that man is nothing--a zero. This is not what the Bible says. There is something great about man, and we ha
...more
Nico Zarate
Mar 09, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: theology
Awesome. Not just awesome in fact, awesome-awesome.
Ryan Hawkins
Second time reading this, but it has been a little while. Schaeffer's ability to argue apologetically is second to none. His ideas are so simple, and yet so profound. That is probably the best way to put it. In short, his thesis is that "the infinite-personal God is there, but also he is not silent; that changes the whole world" (x). He then draws the profound implications of this in the realm of being, morals, and how we know what we know.

He shows that those who live in a closed system, where t
...more
Jesse Miller
This is the third of Francis Schaeffer's great trilogy (preceded by "The God Who Is There" and "Escape From Reason"), and is a direct and concise defense of the existence--indeed, the necessity--of God, and the truth of Christianity. He writes mostly on the subject of epistemology: that branch of philosophy concerned with knowing, and how we know that we know. Fairly dense stuff, but if one pays close attention, I think it is not difficult to understand his reasoning. If you miss something, you ...more
Don Keninitz
Oct 16, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Though a short book, it's not necessarily an easy read. Schaeffer's writing here presumes some familiarity with the arc of philosophical thinking from the Greeks to Kierkegaard, as he alludes to them frequently and what he views as the ultimate failure of their thinking to answer the basic questions of existence.

The book is an effective polemic for the Christian worldview, but bogs down in the last quarter or so as Schaeffer abandons his original focus on metaphysics and logic in favor of his o
...more
Taylor Belt
Nov 04, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
This is a very GREAT book and I highly highly recommend it to everyone. :)
Sam B
Feb 27, 2017 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book should come with complementary aspirin. Very deep stuff here, but worth the read. Excellent for people claiming intellect is holding them back from faith.
E
Dec 05, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is the best of the Schaeffer works I've read so far. Against the existential angst of post-modernism, which has left behind objectivism, positivism, modernism, etc., behind, Schaeffer argues that you can know truth. Why? Because there is a God who has made you in your image (i.e., he is knowable by his creatures), and he has has spoken.

Schaeffer seeks to equip Christians with the knowledge to confront the philosophical milieu of the day. He points out that "students go out from the theologi
...more
Ashley
Jul 18, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: People who want external reasons to believe in Christianity apart from the Bible
This is a very difficult book to get through if you don't have someone explaining it along the way. For me, my Bible study group chose to do this book, and we read a chapter at a time (the book is only 4 chapters long), and talked about it. Actually, it was just the leader of the Bible study explaining what Schaeffer was trying to say, or explaining the background on which Schaeffer based his arguments.

Francis Schaeffer was a Christian philosopher in the 1960s and 1970s who lived in Switzerland.
...more
Levi
Dec 16, 2016 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
It's a wonderful thing to realize that "He Is There and He Is Not Silent" managed to say more about the subject of the knowability of truth and divine revelation in eighty-eight pages than Josh McDowell's "The New Evidence that Demands a Verdict" did in more than six-hundred.

Francis Schaeffer is without a doubt a sophisticated, high-level thinker. His genius is apparent not only in the context of the contemporary era in which he wrote, but also today. This little book discusses, succinctly and
...more
Alex Lomangino
Feb 16, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I am a bit biased as a Francis Schaeffer nerd. I think everything he wrote is gold. The most helpful part about this book is the culmination of his thought on the philosophy of propositional truth.
Jacob O'connor
Ever wait too long to watch a movie?  Everyone is raving about how good it is, but by the time you see it, the hype has spoiled it a little?  That's kinda how I feel about Francis Schaeffer.  Many of his ideas have taken root among modern apologists.  Successors have developed and refined them.  Because he's been copied copiously and pilfered a'plenty, I've seen much of this before.  It blunted the impact his books should have had. 



Couple notes:


-why is there something rather than nothing?


-All me
...more
Tim Kimberley
Nov 15, 2015 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
If you're reading "The God Who Is There", "Escape from Reason" and then this third work "He Is There and He Is Not Silent" then I feel like this book was a bit of summary between the previous two. It was a helpful summary full of Schaeffer's brilliant observations. The last five pages of the book, however, had my heart racing. It's a bit hard to summarize those last several pages without the setup of the entire book leading up to it but let's just say the several hours of plowing through the boo ...more
Richard Minor
Dec 30, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Our culture has attempted to do away with the infinite and it has caused chaos. Our culture's move into naturalism is both irrational and unhealthy. It has caused people to see themselves and the things around them as meaningless. It has left our culture stating that there is no ultimate truth. And with no ultimate truth giving meaning to everything life just doesn't make sense. Yet, there is a system, that when understood, explains the world that surrounds us.

Naturalism simply cannot explain wh
...more
Philip
May 30, 2013 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Yeah, this was a tough read. It is challenging and hard to follow at times. But it is worth it. Schaeffer uses standard philosophical concepts and accepted logical argumentation to bring the readers to the most logical conclusions in terms of reality and existence and God and truth. Yes, Schaeffer is trying to prove his point. And he means to prove it as decisively as he can. If you’re hoping for something less decisive, then a book with a less objective title may suffice. For all those who are ...more
Jenn West
Apr 27, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
A truly wonderful piece for the Christian faith. Schaeffer's explanation of presuppositional apologetics in He Is There and He Is Not Silent, along with The God Who Is There, extensively breaks down the flaws in historical and modern day presuppositions, and explains truly, though not exhaustively, the accuracy of the Biblical position with reality based on a the presupposition of an infinite, Personal, diverse and united God as a reference point for finite, personal man.

Will read and re-read th
...more
Dale
Jun 22, 2012 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Schaeffer starts with a lot of assumptions that you are required to accept before moving on with his arguments. Generally the arguments follow logically, but often I found myself asking for more. I think, in the end, he presents a possible solution to many of the problems he brings up.

I found him incredibly grating with his insistence of his philosophy being the "necessary" solution. While I would like to explore these ideas further, I think I will have to search for other authors who are less p
...more
Al Datum
Apr 20, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Rounds out Schaeffer's trilogy that provide the foundation for his theology. Absolutely essential reading, but read the entire trilogy in order to get the full effect.

Book 1: The God Who Is There
Book 2: Escape From Reason
Book 3: He Is There and He Is Not Silent

You can even find these three in a single volume entitled Francis Schaeffer's Trilogy. Whatever form you find them in, however, definitely check them out. For professional theologians and lay people alike. The impact they'll have on your f
...more
Sonny
Feb 03, 2012 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: apologetics
Francis Schaeffer was a brilliant apologist. In this book, he provides some very convincing arguments why it is quite rational to believe in the existence of God. He lays out metaphysical, moral and epistemological reasons for the existence of an infinite, uncreated God. He shows how no philosophical or religious system other than Christianity can adequately provide the answers about life. However, this isn’t the most accessible book; it might be a very difficult read for many people to follow h ...more
Daniel Swayze
A type of philosophical argument for the necessity of God's being there and not being silent in a way I've not seen before. Intriguing, but not always thorough in his laying out the methods of his reasoning. Not to say his reasoning is flawed, but occasionally I sense that he's working off of an idea that he believes is established--an idea I've not heard before and can't entirely follow (the philosophical "need" for diversity and unity, for instance).
Candice
"Thus the Christian may have fantasy and imagination without being threatened. Modern man cannot have daydreams and fantasy without being threatened. The Christian should be the person who is alive, whose imagination absolutely boils, which moves, which produces something a bit different from God's world because God made us to be creative." - p. 86

The above quote is so wonderful. I really enjoyed the whole book, but that quote will definitely stick with me.
JR Snow
I hate to hate on Shaeffer, but this book, brilliant though I'm sure it is, was so thick and deep so as to deprive me of all my oxygen. And I, struggling along to make sense of the information in said oxygen-deprived-state, understood little. I can't rate a book very highly when I din't learn much from it, especially when that is the main reason I read it. More philosophy and a Dictionary I need, before I tackle Shaeffer.
Lynn Joshua
Feb 18, 2014 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
“I live in a thought world which is filled with creativity; inside my head there is creative imagination. Why? Because God, who is the Creator, has made me in His own image, I can go out in imagination beyond the stars. This is true not only for the Christian, but for every man. Every man is made in the image of God; therefore, no man in his imagination is confined to his own body.” Schaeffer, He Is There and He Is Not Silent
Barbara
Apr 21, 2015 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This is a masterfully written book of philosophy and apologetics discussing metaphysics, morals, and epistemology (how we know things) and showing that Christianity is the only reasonable answer, that God is there and He has spoken to us about Himself and the world He created. It's only 100 pages, but it definitely stretches one's brain power. My full review is at https://barbarah.wordpress.com/2015/0...
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Francis August Schaeffer was an American Evangelical Christian theologian, philosopher, and Presbyterian pastor. He is most famous for his writings and his establishment of the L'Abri community in Switzerland. Opposed to theological modernism, Schaeffer promoted a more historic Protestant faith and a presuppositional approach to Christian apologetics which he believed would answer the questions of ...more
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“The Christian should be the person who is alive, whose imagination absolutely boils, which moves, which produces something a bit different from God's world because God made us to be creative.” 18 likes
“I live in a thought world which is filled with creativity; inside my head there is creative imagination. Why? Because God, who is the Creator, has made me in His own image, I can go out in imagination beyond the stars. This is true not only for the Christian, but for every man. Every man is made in the image of God; therefore, no man in his imagination is confined to his own body.” 6 likes
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