Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Blood Meridian” as Want to Read:
Blank 133x176
Blood Meridian
 
by
Cormac McCarthy
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Blood Meridian

4.18  ·  Rating details ·  83,361 Ratings  ·  7,597 Reviews
An epic novel of the violence and depravity that attended America's westward expansion, Blood Meridian brilliantly subverts the conventions of the Western novel and the mythology of the "wild west." Based on historical events that took place on the Texas-Mexico border in the 1850s, it traces the fortunes of the Kid, a fourteen-year-old Tennesseean who stumbles into the nig ...more
Hardcover
Published April 1st 1992 by Peter Smith Publisher (first published April 28th 1985)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Blood Meridian, please sign up.

Popular Answered Questions

This question contains spoilers… (view spoiler)
Dustin Steinacker Two reasons I suspect:

First, he's got a personal philosophy/credo, and he punishes people who don't hold themselves to it (not unlike Chigurh from No…more
Two reasons I suspect:

First, he's got a personal philosophy/credo, and he punishes people who don't hold themselves to it (not unlike Chigurh from No Country for Old Men). In this case it's an unwavering commitment to war and bloodshed. He saw the kid as the sole member of the party who wavered in that commitment, or at least presented himself as having that perspective.

Second, remember all of that stuff about things existing only with his consent? He sketched an ancient piece of armor and then destroyed it, and later on sketched an old cave painting and then destroyed it. I think there's something he enjoys about being a witness of something and then removing it from existence. With he and the kid the last surviving members of Glanton's Gang I think he's pretty inclined to make everything that happened in that narrative a memory for him and him alone.(less)
Madison Santos I think it has to do with "The Arguments" that begin every Book of Paradise Lost, which if I remember correctly, Milton's editor asked him to include…moreI think it has to do with "The Arguments" that begin every Book of Paradise Lost, which if I remember correctly, Milton's editor asked him to include to make sure everyone understood what happened in the narrative of each Book. Blood Meridian is filled with thematic parallels and scene recreations of Paradise Lost. Could be some other formality I don't know about either, I think I've seen it in a few long poems and definitely in the newspaper briefings that start every chapter of The Lime Twig. (less)
This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Add this book to your favorite list »

Community Reviews

(showing 1-10)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Hamish
Aug 15, 2010 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: re-read-lit, lit
The man finished the book. He closed the pages tightly together then put one foot on the floor then the other then used his hands to push himself up out of the chair and then put one foot in front of the other until he had walked all the way to the book shelf and then put the book on the book shelf. The deer walked in. The man whirled around and fired once with his pistol and the brains of the deer went flying out the back of its head and painted the wall a color dark red like blood. The man sat ...more
Josh
Sep 12, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: NOT the faint of heart
Shelves: blood-meridian
Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian is unquestionably the most violent novel I’ve ever read. It’s also one of the best.

For those who would consider that a turn-off, I offer this caveat:
For the overwhelming majority of fiction that involves a lot of violence, the violence itself is an act of masturbation representing either the author’s dark impulse or, perhaps worse, pandering to the reader’s similar revenge fantasies (this might explain why the majority of Blood Meridian fans I know personally are
...more
Stephen
Photobucket

Spilled...emptied...wrung outsoul-ripped...that pretty accurately sums up my emotional composition after finishing this singular work of art. Ironically, I’m sure I only absorbed about 10% of the “message” McCarthy was conveying in this epic exposition on war, violence and man’s affinity for both. Still, even with my imperfect comprehension, I was shaken enough by the experience that, though I finished the book days ago, I’m just now at the point where I can revisit the jumble in my head enoug
...more
Michael Finocchiaro
Breathless. Unique. Brutal. There are many words that could be used to describe Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. For me, this was my second time through and I liked it far better than my first reading. Judge Holden, John Job Glanton, Toadvine, and the "kid" are all fantastic characters. I shudder to think that the horrors visited upon the Indians and Mexicans and homesteaders were all based on fact. The apocalypse described in The Road is not too far a cry from the hellish country on the US-Me ...more
·Karen·
Aug 11, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: usa, mttbr-2012
This is Jane Austen antimatter.

Trying to convey how this was so different to anything I've ever read, it occurred to me that it was like a huge black vortex that would suck early nineteenth century marriage plot novels into the void. It's the complete obverse of sweet girlie stuff: no lurve, no irony (I wonder if Cormac McCarthy has a humour mode? If he does, he certainly wasn't in it writing this), no insightful self-discovery or examination of the human heart. No, this is bleak and bloody, go
...more
Lyn
Jul 18, 2011 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
After reading Blood Meridian, I may never view a western film the same way again.

To be certain, it is a masterpiece, a rare and unique work of literature that rises above classification and genre. And to be certain, McCarthy must be viewed as a great American writer, one of the greatest in our time.

That having been said, this book is not for everyone; it is painfully brutal, violent at it's heart. McCarthy's primitive writing style emphasizes this primal, bloody landscape like a Jonathon Edwar
...more
Eric
Sep 07, 2007 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Recommends it for: people who want to believe in the inherent evil of mankind
Shelves: literature
There are two ways to evaluate a book, as far as my unlearned mind can concoct at the moment. Stylish literary flourishes sometimes cloud our judgment when it comes to evaluating the plot itself, which is, after all, the reason why the book exists.

This book is well written. If I'm a 11th grader, and I need to do a book report, I'm drooling over the blatant symbolism dripping from each page. The scene is set admirably, though the repetitive nature of our brave hero's wanderings (at least it's wit
...more
Fabian
May 18, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Cormac McCarthy's west of absolutes is a wonder to behold. Villainous attacks on people devoid a home, desecration of the west-land, listings of all things in the majestic, transitory landscape like observations by Darwin at the Galapagos in lush (sometimes horrific) detail, murky human psyches, no dialogue, and especially that campfire philosophy by which anyone can find some sort of meaning in their modern lives (especially if you're fortunate enough to inhabit the places which Mr. McCarthy de ...more
Samadrita
The wiki page for 'manifest destiny' has a picture of a painting by John Gast depicting an angelic figure (personification of America) purposefully drifting towards the west, her pristine white robes and blonde curls billowing in the breeze, a book nestled in the crook of her arm. Airborne, she awakens stretches of barren, craggy terrain to the magical touch of modernization. The landscapes she leaves behind are dotted by shipyards and railways and telegraph wires strung on poles but to her left ...more
J. Kent Messum
Quite possibly the most chilling and horrifying book ever written, 'Blood Meridian' is a unnerving glimpse of humanity at its worst during one of the most savage periods in American history. McCarthy pulls back the curtain to reveal the unforgivable evils and trespasses our species made all too often and all too easily in a new world, a novel that shows us the true price we paid in bodies and blood for the expansion of the 'Wild West'.

Unlike some of Cormac's other work, 'Blood Meridian' is not
...more
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 next »
  • Warlock (Legends West, #1)
  • Gravity's Rainbow
  • Dog Soldiers
  • Libra
  • The Recognitions
  • A Dance to the Music of Time: 1st Movement (A Dance to the Music of Time, #1-3)
  • Falconer
  • The Young Man's Guide
  • The Sheltering Sky
  • The Power and the Glory
  • At Swim-Two-Birds
  • Strenuous Life
  • Pale Fire
  • Seek: Reports from the Edges of America and Beyond
  • Miss Lonelyhearts / The Day of the Locust
  • The Book of Deeds of Arms and of Chivalry
  • The Adventures of Augie March
  • The Assistant
4178
Cormac McCarthy is an American novelist and playwright. He has written ten novels in the Southern Gothic, western, and post-apocalyptic genres and has also written plays and screenplays. He received the Pulitzer Prize in 2007 for The Road, and his 2005 novel No Country for Old Men was adapted as a 2007 film of the same name, which won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

His earlier Blood M
...more
More about Cormac McCarthy...
“Whatever in creation exists without my knowledge exists without my consent.” 512 likes
“The truth about the world, he said, is that anything is possible. Had you not seen it all from birth and thereby bled it of its strangeness it would appear to you for what it is, a hat trick in a medicine show, a fevered dream, a trance bepopulate with chimeras having neither analogue nor precedent, an itinerant carnival, a migratory tentshow whose ultimate destination after many a pitch in many a mudded field is unspeakable and calamitous beyond reckoning.

The universe is no narrow thing and the order within it is not constrained by any latitude in its conception to repeat what exists in one part in any other part. Even in this world more things exist without our knowledge than with it and the order in creation which you see is that which you have put there, like a string in a maze, so that you shall not lose your way. For existence has its own order and that no man's mind can compass, that mind itself being but a fact among others.”
373 likes
More quotes…